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Author Topic: HF propagation on other planets?  (Read 8973 times)
WA2ISE
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Posts: 117




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« on: July 10, 2014, 07:36:32 PM »

Silly question, but anyone have theories if HF propagation on say Mars would be similar if not the same as it is on Earth.  From one location on Mars to some other beyond line of sight.  Mars has an atmosphere, thinner than ours, but it probably has an ionosphere.  Both planets share the same Sun, and thus subject to the same solar cycle. 

I doubt we could do QSOs between Earth and Mars, assuming ham astronauts took some gear to Mars (won't be soon...). 
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AK7V
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« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2014, 08:02:28 AM »

I think it's an awesome question.

Mars has a weaker magnetic field, and that probably means that its ionosphere is effected more by solar wind than ours is.  So I don't think it would be very similar to earth, propagation-wise.  Probably worse.  Maybe like ours is in the middle of the worst solar flare/solar storm/radio black-out ever.

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AF5CC
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« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2014, 09:00:27 PM »

I think it's an awesome question.

Mars has a weaker magnetic field, and that probably means that its ionosphere is effected more by solar wind than ours is.  So I don't think it would be very similar to earth, propagation-wise.  Probably worse.  Maybe like ours is in the middle of the worst solar flare/solar storm/radio black-out ever.



I have wondered this myself. Is there any way to tell whether Mars (or other planets) actually have an ionosphere?  Venus doesn't have a magnetic field at all, and is closer to the sun, so it would be getting clobbered by the solar wind, but does it have an ionosphere?  I do know that Jupiter has auroras, so VHF propagation would be possible, plus lots of satellites for JSJ (Jupiter-Satellite-Jupiter) QSOs like our EME.

John AF5CC
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K6EK
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« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2014, 03:02:55 PM »

Why not ask your question (a dandy one, BTW) to the good folks at JPL in Pasadena, CA ?  I'd think they would know.

Ken
K6EK
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G4IJE
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« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2014, 07:04:03 AM »

Great question. This looks interesting:

http://sci.esa.int/mars-express/51056-new-views-of-the-martian-ionosphere/

So there may be some kind of ionospheric HF propagation on Mars. I wonder when the first QSO will take place?
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