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Author Topic: Zero to Extra Class in 3 Weeks. Confession of a Dick Bash Ham  (Read 13231 times)
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3602




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« Reply #75 on: April 12, 2013, 06:46:05 PM »

8N: 
Quote
Unfortunately no kind of testing is a filter for keeping riff raff out.

It has done that very thing, for the most part, for several decades!

However, I do question the term "riff raff."  I, by no means consider anyone riff raff but we are seeing an influx of people who are OK with turning ham radio into another CB fiasco.

The first thing they do is minimize the need for the existing rules, regulations, technical qualifications, customs and purpose of ham radio.

Ham radio is the only hobby controlled by a federal entity.  It is a technical hobby where the federal government encourages participants to build, experiment and modify their equipment.  They're the only communicators, with the exception of the military, that use VFO control of their transmitting equipment. 

Quote
Speaking of surgeons, think of how many you have heard of who have butchered people up, or are known to be drug addicts since they have access to medicine - look at how much testing and training THEY went through.

Sure, they're are exceptions to everything, and we admit we have a bunch of a..holes on 75 and 20m that you can categorize with these "surgeons",  but all in all this statement is BS.

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K9AIM
Member

Posts: 917




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« Reply #76 on: April 12, 2013, 07:26:51 PM »

Unfortunately, people act like amateur radio IS some kind of surgery, or some job working with nuclear materials. It's not, it's only about talking, and having a proper station. That's all. Unfortunately no kind of testing is a filter for keeping riff raff out. Technical ability and personality traits are two different things. Speaking of surgeons, think of how many you have heard of who have butchered people up, or are known to be drug addicts since they have access to medicine - look at how much testing and training THEY went through.

My point was simply that the harder it is to attain a given thing, and the more work required to get it -- the more likely those who do get it will appreciate and take care of it.  75 meters is full of people who are not taking care of amateur radio. It is degenerate.

As for drug addict surgeons -- rather than deal in innuendo how about a link showing the average rate of drug addiction among the general population vs. that of surgeons. Also for those who butcher people?  I bet a significant amount of medical quackery is by people pretending to have license...   

I know that if I work hard for something I appreciate it more and take better care of it.  Learning Morse code was a real barrier for me that would have stopped me cold had I not really taken getting a license seriously.   

75 meters, like television, is nothing like what it was in 1977 when I passed my Advanced. But I still think 75 meters would be in much better shape today if HF phone privileges were still tied to some kind of morse code fluency testing.   
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3602




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« Reply #77 on: April 13, 2013, 06:22:38 PM »

Quote
My point was simply that the harder it is to attain a given thing, and the more work required to get it -- the more likely those who do get it will appreciate and take care of it.  75 meters is full of people who are not taking care of amateur radio. It is degenerate.

As for drug addict surgeons -- rather than deal in innuendo how about a link showing the average rate of drug addiction among the general population vs. that of surgeons. Also for those who butcher people?  I bet a significant amount of medical quackery is by people pretending to have license...   

I know that if I work hard for something I appreciate it more and take better care of it.  Learning Morse code was a real barrier for me that would have stopped me cold had I not really taken getting a license seriously.   

75 meters, like television, is nothing like what it was in 1977 when I passed my Advanced. But I still think 75 meters would be in much better shape today if HF phone privileges were still tied to some kind of morse code fluency testing. 

Concur 100%!
 
 
 
 
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