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Author Topic: Good dual band HT for someone who rarely uses one  (Read 8694 times)
K0OD
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Posts: 2520




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« Reply #15 on: May 05, 2013, 09:36:58 PM »

    "Good dual band HT for someone who rarely uses one"

Same boat here. Their complexity kept me from buying a HT for 20+ years. My fave was the little ICOM IC2A, with its tuning wheels, from 30 years ago. So simple!

Just yesterday I ordered a VX3 dual bander from R&L ($185) mainly for tornado alerts. Liked the fact that it can also be used to monitor rail and air frequencies on trips. Tunes 500 kHz to 999 MHz!

It's credit card size and only puts out about 1.5 watts. I'm not sure it was exactly what I needed. Ordered the programming software and bigger whip too.
 
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W7EJT
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Posts: 132




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« Reply #16 on: May 16, 2013, 11:15:28 AM »

Agree that for less than $50, you can't beat this handheld. I have two.

The only issue was weak audio. Took advice from a user group and drilled out the mic "hole" to about twice it's size. Bingo! Perfect now!!

I wouldn't try this mod from the outside. Take it apart and drill from the inside (or you'll probably nuke the mic). Putting it back together took some gymnastics, though...

My .02
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K4JJL
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Posts: 476




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« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2013, 07:28:33 AM »

Agree that for less than $50, you can't beat this handheld. I have two.

The only issue was weak audio. Took advice from a user group and drilled out the mic "hole" to about twice it's size. Bingo! Perfect now!!

I wouldn't try this mod from the outside. Take it apart and drill from the inside (or you'll probably nuke the mic). Putting it back together took some gymnastics, though...

My .02

I had a Yaesu speaker mic that had the same problem.  I used a needle heated up with a candle to poke a hole in the plastic.  Didn't have to disassemble or wreck the board.
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KF7VXA
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Posts: 412




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« Reply #18 on: May 31, 2013, 04:51:09 PM »

I have several brands of Chicom radios and a Yaesu FT-60. The Chicom radios may work, but none are as tough as the Yaesu.
For a cheap radio to throw in my vehicle, the Chicom's are fine, but I don't really trust them all that much. Too easy to change things such as freqs ect. The Yaesu works every time, takes the AA battery pack and of course the ciarette lighter plug in.
For just a little extra money, you will have a solid radio that will be working for years to come.

I should add, I had a Chicom radio go bad, had to send it back to China. It cost $17.00 just for postage and that was just the radio body, no battery, antenna or anything else. I look at the Chicoms now as throw aways.
Programming them can be a major pain also. The cords that come with many of them have counterfit chips in them so you end up having to spend another $15.00 to get a quality programming cord. Found that out the hard way also.

My Best, John
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WALTERB
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Posts: 528




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« Reply #19 on: June 02, 2013, 08:39:25 AM »

http://www.amazon.com/Baofeng-UV5RA-136-174-Dual-Band-Transceiver/dp/B009MAKWC0/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1370187542&sr=8-2&keywords=baofeng
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KC1MK
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Posts: 24




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« Reply #20 on: June 03, 2013, 12:22:29 PM »

I don't operate VHF/UHF FM much, but do enjoy it occasionally. I recently bought an Icom IC-T70A, and so far I am very pleased with it. It doesn't have wide-range receive, which is a plus for me (I use a GRE PSR-800 for scanning). It's pretty simple to learn and operate, and the battery life is very good. I got the Sport model with the AA battery holder, and also got the 1900-mAH battery and rapid drop-in charger. I use the RT Systems software and cable to program it. It's rather more expensive than some other HTs, but since I typically only buy an HT every decade or so, that wasn't a big deal.
73,
Jeff, KC1MK
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VA7VO
Member

Posts: 13




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« Reply #21 on: June 04, 2013, 06:55:11 AM »

Hi,
I have tried only two just to see what the experience would be using FM on satellites. The first was the Kenwood Thf6 and found the intermod and receive gain was not that good as well as receive audio.
Next the IC-91A. Receive gain good, not too bad for programming, screen is a little hard to read, dual receive and great tx audio response.
Tracking is easy with dual VFO's, used, about $160? Mine is 6 years old and fits the hand the way a radio should.
However, the triband from Alinco with 1.2Ghz works really well, programming is straight forward, on 1.2Ghz simplex it has good audio (using my 736 as a test) and for $240 not a bad deal.
Actually that's three, while the older radio may be good they are no longer supported by the various manufacturers.
It's wiser to go with a newer model.

Glenn, VA7VO
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