Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Getting Ready for 1.5KW  (Read 3914 times)
W6UV
Member

Posts: 540




Ignore
« on: April 05, 2013, 08:39:19 AM »

I'm planning to buy my first amp soon and want to make sure my station is ready for the higher power.

I've replaced the standard balun on my TH-7DX with the higher power version (supposedly rated for 4KW) and have the 2KW version of the Alpha Delta surge protectors. All of the coax in my station is Bury-Flex.

Other than having an electrician install a 20A 240v circuit to the shack, is there anything else I should upgrade or do to get ready for the amp?
Logged
AH6RR
Member

Posts: 803




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2013, 09:18:04 AM »

A dummy load that will handle the power with some room to spare. It is a must with any amp.
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20636




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2013, 09:55:22 AM »

Maybe an SWR/Wattmeter rated at least 2kW, if you don't already have one?

Possible upgrades to other antennas (for bands below 20m), if you have any?
Logged
W6UV
Member

Posts: 540




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2013, 11:01:19 AM »

Dummy load -- forgot about that. I have a 300W dummy load, so it looks like I should get something that can handle 1.5KW. How about something like a Cantenna?

I've got an LP-100A wattmeter with the coupler that handles 1500W, 3000W peak, so I think I'm okay there.
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 6468




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2013, 11:25:15 AM »

Dummy load -- forgot about that. I have a 300W dummy load, so it looks like I should get something that can handle 1.5KW. How about something like a Cantenna?

I've got an LP-100A wattmeter with the coupler that handles 1500W, 3000W peak, so I think I'm okay there.

A Cantenna will work fine. Do allow some time for it to cool if you do several minutes of key down full power tuning.
Logged

--------------------------------------
All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
W4VR
Member

Posts: 1198


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2013, 12:38:26 PM »

A dummy load that will handle the power with some room to spare. It is a must with any amp.

Back in the old days people used dummy loads to tune up their amplifiers...not anymore.  I can't have a QSO without someone tuning up on the frequency.  I use a solid state amplifier so there is not tune up involved.  When I had the Alpha amplifiers I would dial in the settings for each band and go without tuning up.
Logged
KM3F
Member

Posts: 520




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2013, 12:50:54 PM »

If you plan on using a dipole or some other antenna config from 40m down, the tuner needs to have the same rateing as the amplifier plus a little to spare.
The cost of the amplifier plus the cost of a good tuner adds up fast.
Good luck.
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4844




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2013, 01:29:56 PM »

A load of ferrites to deal with EMC problems....
Logged
W6UV
Member

Posts: 540




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2013, 03:23:22 PM »

A load of ferrites to deal with EMC problems....

I'm keeping my fingers crossed that I won't have to deal with too much of that. My nearest neighbor is 1/4 mile away, which helps.
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 6468




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2013, 03:49:41 PM »

A load of ferrites to deal with EMC problems....

I'm keeping my fingers crossed that I won't have to deal with too much of that. My nearest neighbor is 1/4 mile away, which helps.

He was likely not referring to your neighbors.
Logged

--------------------------------------
All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
W6UV
Member

Posts: 540




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2013, 12:38:44 AM »

A load of ferrites to deal with EMC problems....

I'm keeping my fingers crossed that I won't have to deal with too much of that. My nearest neighbor is 1/4 mile away, which helps.

He was likely not referring to your neighbors.

Well, when I'm operating I'm not watching TV, listening to the radio, talking on the phone, or doing other things I would care about EMC wreaking havoc with.  Cheesy
Logged
KC4MOP
Member

Posts: 759




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2013, 04:57:34 AM »

I operate QRO and my antennas are 200 feet from other neighbors and no problem here. It is folks who operate with high power in small city lots and antennas 30 feet from neighbors that have the grief. I've been there from previous QTH's.
You are in a perfect radio location...no one around with their EMC to YOU. Cable modem switching power supplies, Electronic blower controls on furnaces, plasma TV's, etc etc
If ya got the cash get a big amp. There are threads on what to look for here. It will be expensive. Solid state is more $$. The $$ are big whatever you look at these days.
Fred
Logged
W9KDX
Member

Posts: 771




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: April 06, 2013, 06:15:39 AM »

At least this one won't cost you anything, but you need to do a new RF assessment so that you don't exceed the Maximum Permissible Exposure.
Logged

Sam
W9KDX
K4RVN
Member

Posts: 794




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: April 06, 2013, 07:08:30 AM »

Buy you an inexpensive field strength meter and hang it on the wall over the amp near your feed line going to the antenna. Your existing  R.F. ground system may develop a ground loop. Make sure all equipment ties to the ground at a single pint and not a daisy chain. The field strength meter will alert you to RF in the shack which is bad for you and your receiver.

Frank
Logged
W9KDX
Member

Posts: 771




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: April 06, 2013, 08:17:25 PM »

Buy you an inexpensive field strength meter and hang it on the wall over the amp near your feed line going to the antenna. Your existing  R.F. ground system may develop a ground loop. Make sure all equipment ties to the ground at a single pint and not a daisy chain. The field strength meter will alert you to RF in the shack which is bad for you and your receiver.

Frank

That is not really what I was referring to.  I am talking about the FCC regulations relating to a required assessment.  See here:  http://www.arrl.org/fcc-rf-exposure-regulations-the-station-evaluation

As this is still up on the ARRL site, I assume the regulations are still in effect but I am not an expert here.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2013, 08:52:40 PM by W9KDX » Logged

Sam
W9KDX
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!