Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 2 3 4 [5] 6 7 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Windows XP - the end approaches......  (Read 20000 times)
W8JX
Member

Posts: 6030




Ignore
« Reply #60 on: May 12, 2013, 01:24:28 PM »

I still mainly run XP. Also use Linux Mint on a laptop and "Easy Peasy" on the Asus Netbook. No plans to upgrade to Windows 8 (I doubt Win 8 would run on my low to medium end XP machines anyway).

And I refuse to buy any new computer with Windows 8. Perhaps Microsoft will come to their senses and go back and release a normal OS like Win 7. Otherwise I'll just continue to run XP on my main computers or migrate more to Linux.

For the older Operating Systems, Windows 2000 was/is a good performer and still useful for some applications. And Windows 95 and Windows 98 can run older packet radio applications (and logging programs) as well as Win 2000 and XP using hyperterminal.

Just because the OS is dated no reason to stop using the computer. I'm sure non of us would toss out their Icom IC 706 MKIIG rigs because they are discontinued by Icom.

As long as I can get around the internet safely, I don't care what the OS is (as long as it is NOT Win 8 )  .

The "problem" is Internet standards have changed a lot and old hardware and OS cannot fully support it. As far as WIN 8 I admit I was not that crazy about it but after using it several times and getting to know it is WAY better than XP and maybe & to in some ways.
Logged

--------------------------------------
All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
K5UNX
Member

Posts: 286


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #61 on: May 13, 2013, 08:07:06 AM »

The "problem" is Internet standards have changed a lot and old hardware and OS cannot fully support it. As far as WIN 8 I admit I was not that crazy about it but after using it several times and getting to know it is WAY better than XP and maybe & to in some ways.

I am using Win 8 at work. I like it. I had to figure out a few ways to do things but once I did that, it's really nice. I don't miss the start button at all. If you remove all except for the commonly used tiles from the start screen, it really helps. Also use the Windows key. That's a good thing now . . .
Logged

W8JX
Member

Posts: 6030




Ignore
« Reply #62 on: May 13, 2013, 09:33:29 AM »

The "problem" is Internet standards have changed a lot and old hardware and OS cannot fully support it. As far as WIN 8 I admit I was not that crazy about it but after using it several times and getting to know it is WAY better than XP and maybe & to in some ways.

I am using Win 8 at work. I like it. I had to figure out a few ways to do things but once I did that, it's really nice. I don't miss the start button at all. If you remove all except for the commonly used tiles from the start screen, it really helps. Also use the Windows key. That's a good thing now . . .

And corners of screen too. You can tell it was designed for a tablet first, desktop second.
Logged

--------------------------------------
All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
K5UNX
Member

Posts: 286


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #63 on: May 13, 2013, 09:36:00 AM »

The "problem" is Internet standards have changed a lot and old hardware and OS cannot fully support it. As far as WIN 8 I admit I was not that crazy about it but after using it several times and getting to know it is WAY better than XP and maybe & to in some ways.

I am using Win 8 at work. I like it. I had to figure out a few ways to do things but once I did that, it's really nice. I don't miss the start button at all. If you remove all except for the commonly used tiles from the start screen, it really helps. Also use the Windows key. That's a good thing now . . .

And corners of screen too. You can tell it was designed for a tablet first, desktop second.

Yea the corners are helpful. I find that I just don't use the "Metro" apps much. I use the normal Windows apps and just use the Start screen . . .  The News/Sports apps are kind of nice once you get to know how to manage those in the sidebar. I have two screens so I drag the Metro News app to my second monitor and use it there.
Logged

KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 471




Ignore
« Reply #64 on: May 13, 2013, 04:39:50 PM »

Windows XP is the last Windows product I owned.  It is the last one I will ever use, as well.  It works fine for running Win32 applications, including most new games, it's fairly stable, and as long as you use a decent web browser and avoid downloading questionable files, it is not dangerous on the internet.  I especially recommend running it behind NAT, that way you can keep it safe.

Why was it be my last Windows?  Well, a couple of reasons.  Microsoft is a terrible company, their customer service is just horrifically bad, and they are complacent because they are the market leader.  Almost every piece of Windows software made can easily run on a Mac, Linux, or FreeBSD through Wine.  The UI has gone from usable to shockingly bad in the three revisions since XP.  It also seems that every important innovation in the GUI / OS department only reaches Microsoft years or a decade after it is proved to be useful.  Drivers!  Need I mention more?  Linux, FreeBSD, and OS X all seem to work with almost every piece of hardware out there, without needing special drivers.  Windows drivers come from questionable companies in places like China, where you really have no idea what the hell you are installing when you give that application installer its permission.

Microsoft is now making you pay for development tools.  You can use other tools like GCC on Windows, but what a hairy mess that is!  Sorry, guys, you should know by now that in order to court old developers and create new ones, you should throw in the entire, non-neutered, development toolchain for free.

No, Windows is mid 1990s tech, and it has had a few too many face lifts for me.  Sure, Unix is older, but it's essentially just a titanium skeleton on top of which a modern OS is made.
Logged
WB0KSL
Member

Posts: 94




Ignore
« Reply #65 on: May 13, 2013, 08:10:33 PM »

Windows 8 = Windows Diablo, or Vista II if you prefer.  I hate it, but have to have it to keep myself able to run some of the newer software.  Guess it's like politics or religion to some extent. Whatever keeps your boat afloat :-)

73 de wb0ksl
John

Sent from my iPad, BTW Wink


Logged
SWL2002
Member

Posts: 345




Ignore
« Reply #66 on: May 14, 2013, 03:31:12 AM »

Windows XP is the last Windows product I owned.  It is the last one I will ever use, as well.  It works fine for running Win32 applications, including most new games, it's fairly stable, and as long as you use a decent web browser and avoid downloading questionable files, it is not dangerous on the internet.  I especially recommend running it behind NAT, that way you can keep it safe.

Why was it be my last Windows?  Well, a couple of reasons.  Microsoft is a terrible company, their customer service is just horrifically bad, and they are complacent because they are the market leader.  Almost every piece of Windows software made can easily run on a Mac, Linux, or FreeBSD through Wine.  The UI has gone from usable to shockingly bad in the three revisions since XP.  It also seems that every important innovation in the GUI / OS department only reaches Microsoft years or a decade after it is proved to be useful.  Drivers!  Need I mention more?  Linux, FreeBSD, and OS X all seem to work with almost every piece of hardware out there, without needing special drivers.  Windows drivers come from questionable companies in places like China, where you really have no idea what the hell you are installing when you give that application installer its permission.

Microsoft is now making you pay for development tools.  You can use other tools like GCC on Windows, but what a hairy mess that is!  Sorry, guys, you should know by now that in order to court old developers and create new ones, you should throw in the entire, non-neutered, development toolchain for free.

No, Windows is mid 1990s tech, and it has had a few too many face lifts for me.  Sure, Unix is older, but it's essentially just a titanium skeleton on top of which a modern OS is made.

 I have had just as many issues in Linux and OS X as I have had on Windows XP.  Windows 7 and Windows 8, I have had no application or driver issues.  They just work.  Linux is OK if you want to spend your time on newsgroups or support forums figuring out why certain hardware won't work or an application crashes.  OS X is better, but there are some really silly UI stuff in there too.  Lots of issues with i(Whatever) from Apple if you look in the support groups.   That you have less issues on Linux or Mac is a myth.

Apple's business practices are as bad or worse than MS in some ways.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2013, 03:33:59 AM by SWL2002 » Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 6030




Ignore
« Reply #67 on: May 14, 2013, 06:49:14 AM »

I have had just as many issues in Linux and OS X as I have had on Windows XP.  Windows 7 and Windows 8, I have had no application or driver issues.  They just work.  Linux is OK if you want to spend your time on newsgroups or support forums figuring out why certain hardware won't work or an application crashes.  OS X is better, but there are some really silly UI stuff in there too.  Lots of issues with i(Whatever) from Apple if you look in the support groups.   That you have less issues on Linux or Mac is a myth.

Apple's business practices are as bad or worse than MS in some ways.

Well put. I use Windows not because I love it but rather because it is the best game in town with by far the widest app and driver support too. Mac while seeing varying share of market will never be more than a nitch computer will limited app and driver support and Apples mentality on hardware design does not help. On Linux, because of the lack of one universal standard and GUI for it it will never make a big dent and is a hobby OS at best even though it is pretty stable. Most of the problems users have had with vista and 7 is bad hardware or not enough ram because OS's are pretty stable on right hardware.
Logged

--------------------------------------
All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
WW7KE
Member

Posts: 65




Ignore
« Reply #68 on: May 14, 2013, 09:03:28 AM »

I have had just as many issues in Linux and OS X as I have had on Windows XP.  Windows 7 and Windows 8, I have had no application or driver issues.  They just work.  Linux is OK if you want to spend your time on newsgroups or support forums figuring out why certain hardware won't work or an application crashes.  OS X is better, but there are some really silly UI stuff in there too.  Lots of issues with i(Whatever) from Apple if you look in the support groups.   That you have less issues on Linux or Mac is a myth.

Apple's business practices are as bad or worse than MS in some ways.

Well put. I use Windows not because I love it but rather because it is the best game in town with by far the widest app and driver support too. Mac while seeing varying share of market will never be more than a nitch computer will limited app and driver support and Apples mentality on hardware design does not help. On Linux, because of the lack of one universal standard and GUI for it it will never make a big dent and is a hobby OS at best even though it is pretty stable. Most of the problems users have had with vista and 7 is bad hardware or not enough ram because OS's are pretty stable on right hardware.

Not to start a Windows-vs-Linux flame war here, but most mainstream Linux distros have no issues with any hardware made in the last 5 years.  Can't say the same about Windows XP or 7.  I've done plenty of installs of both, and have had the most trouble getting Windows drivers to work, or even finding them in some cases.

If one sticks to the most popular Linux distros (Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora, etc.), there won't be any hardware or driver issues.  But using something that is more "bare-metal," such as Slackware or Gentoo, might give an inexperienced person fits.  I use Slackware and Mint and have no trouble with either as far as setting them up is concerned, but some of my low-end PCs just won't run Slackware due to video issues, but run Mint just fine.  But those same PCs won't run Windows 7 either.

And there is plenty of good software for Linux.  In fact, most of the more popular ones (Firefox, Google Chrome, LibreOffice, VLC media player, VMWare) are available for both.  This is as it should be.  There certainly are more software titles available for Windows, but the gap is narrowing.

If you want to use a Raspberry Pi, you're going to use Linux.  Windows is not available for it, and probably will never be.

People are going to use what they like, so there is no sense arguing about it.  Windows and Linux both have their good and bad points.  But Windows 8 is becoming an albatross for Microsoft (and they are almost a non-entity in the mobile space), just like ME and Vista were (they seem to royally screw up every second version of Windows).  I just won't buy anything that has Windows 8 on it if the vendor says it voids the warranty if I install anything else (That means you, Best Buy).

I can't comment on any Apple product because I've never used one - not even an Apple II.
Logged
SWL2002
Member

Posts: 345




Ignore
« Reply #69 on: May 14, 2013, 09:47:42 AM »


If one sticks to the most popular Linux distros (Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora, etc.), there won't be any hardware or driver issues.  But using something that is more "bare-metal," such as Slackware or Gentoo, might give an inexperienced person fits.  I use Slackware and Mint and have no trouble with either as far as setting them up is concerned, but some of my low-end PCs just won't run Slackware due to video issues, but run Mint just fine.  But those same PCs won't run Windows 7 either.

And there is plenty of good software for Linux.  In fact, most of the more popular ones (Firefox, Google Chrome, LibreOffice, VLC media player, VMWare) are available for both.  This is as it should be.  There certainly are more software titles available for Windows, but the gap is narrowing.


Interesting.  My experience is quite the opposite.  More problems getting the right drivers on Linux and many sound card and video card driver snafus on Linux.  Then after/if you get things running OK on Linux, there is always a glitch here and there.

Any serious software that you have to use in business and to get things done just isn't quite there in Linux.  LibreOffice is a joke compared to MS Office, for example.  It is OK for home/hobby users, but an exercise in frustration in a business setting.  A lot of the software on Linux is half done/half implemented and frustrating to use.  I do use Linux, mainly for GNURadio and Linrad which runs better on Linux than Windows (the main developers did not target Windows), but I could do without Linux, unlike Windows.

Oh, I have had many more applications software crashes on Linux than in Windows since Windows 95/98.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2013, 09:55:29 AM by SWL2002 » Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 6030




Ignore
« Reply #70 on: May 14, 2013, 10:13:52 AM »


Not to start a Windows-vs-Linux flame war here, but most mainstream Linux distros have no issues with any hardware made in the last 5 years.  Can't say the same about Windows XP or 7.  I've done plenty of installs of both, and have had the most trouble getting Windows drivers to work, or even finding them in some cases.


Because hardware and software is evolving it is foolish to think you can put Win7 or 8 on old hardware and have a "new" computer and not expect some problems. The solution is use newer hardware if you want newer OS just like it is silly to use old OS on new hardware. If you use the right hardware for OS with Windows you will have no problems.
Logged

--------------------------------------
All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 471




Ignore
« Reply #71 on: May 16, 2013, 03:12:46 PM »


Not to start a Windows-vs-Linux flame war here, but most mainstream Linux distros have no issues with any hardware made in the last 5 years.  Can't say the same about Windows XP or 7.  I've done plenty of installs of both, and have had the most trouble getting Windows drivers to work, or even finding them in some cases.


Because hardware and software is evolving it is foolish to think you can put Win7 or 8 on old hardware and have a "new" computer and not expect some problems. The solution is use newer hardware if you want newer OS just like it is silly to use old OS on new hardware. If you use the right hardware for OS with Windows you will have no problems.

It's crazy to expect that a major OS vendor would provide drivers for extremely common devices, I know.  MS and the computer manufacturers must have a secret pact - the computer makers provide Windows, and MS fails to make drivers for older devices available.  Everybody wins except the people who use computers!
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 6030




Ignore
« Reply #72 on: May 16, 2013, 03:41:34 PM »

It's crazy to expect that a major OS vendor would provide drivers for extremely common devices, I know.  MS and the computer manufacturers must have a secret pact - the computer makers provide Windows, and MS fails to make drivers for older devices available.  Everybody wins except the people who use computers!

Actually there is a lot of drivers out there for new devises and Windows comes with many too. But there is little profit in writing new drivers for old device at end of life cycle or writing drivers for new devices to support a old OS at end of life cycle.   
Logged

--------------------------------------
All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
WB6DGN
Member

Posts: 619




Ignore
« Reply #73 on: May 19, 2013, 04:42:14 PM »

Gosh, all the cheap old-fart hams are coming out of the woodwork on this one.

Just the kind of comment I might expect from someone  who is ashamed to post his/her callsign; OR, don't you have one???

With age comes the realization that having the "latest and greatest" of everything is nothing more than egotistical stupidity coupled with a hefty dose of arrogance.
Tom
Logged
SWL2002
Member

Posts: 345




Ignore
« Reply #74 on: May 19, 2013, 05:59:22 PM »

Gosh, all the cheap old-fart hams are coming out of the woodwork on this one.

Just the kind of comment I might expect from someone  who is ashamed to post his/her callsign; OR, don't you have one???

With age comes the realization that having the "latest and greatest" of everything is nothing more than egotistical stupidity coupled with a hefty dose of arrogance.
Tom

No one is talking about having to have the latest and greatest.  But it is ridiculous to be stuck with old outdated hardware and an unsupportd operating system just because you are afraid of change.  People like you like to use the above excuse you have given when the truth is that you are just afraid and set in your ways.  You know deep down inside that it is true too, it bothers you so much that you come in a forum like this to huff and puff.  Sorry to have upset you so.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2013, 06:02:31 PM by SWL2002 » Logged
Pages: Prev 1 2 3 4 [5] 6 7 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!