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Author Topic: Locator via GPS?  (Read 63569 times)
ONAIR
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« on: February 29, 2016, 09:52:33 PM »

   I recently misplaced my iPad, but was easily able to locate it via the finder app provided by Apple! (I had left it at a restaurant, and had it back within 24 hours.)  Is something like this available for radio equipment?
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W8JX
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« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2016, 01:26:39 PM »

   I recently misplaced my iPad, but was easily able to locate it via the finder app provided by Apple! (I had left it at a restaurant, and had it back within 24 hours.)  Is something like this available for radio equipment?

Rigs are going to meed GPS and broadband or cellular connectivity by default and do not see that happening any time soon.
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You can embrace new computing technology and change with it or cling to past and fall further behind everyday....
N0YXB
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« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2016, 06:44:12 PM »

In the interim, this is a possibility.

https://www.thetileapp.com/
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AA4PB
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« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2016, 10:09:53 AM »

The problem with the finder tile is that it's Bluetooth which has a maximum range of about 100 feet. Great for locating where you left your keys around the house but not so good for finding a stolen transceiver unless the thief has it in the apartment next to you.
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W8JX
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« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2016, 05:39:27 AM »

The problem with the finder tile is that it's Bluetooth which has a maximum range of about 100 feet. Great for locating where you left your keys around the house but not so good for finding a stolen transceiver unless the thief has it in the apartment next to you.


If it is class one Bluetooth its range is up to 100 meters in theory and with a high gain directional antenna you could boost that 2 to 3x or more. (this would not be hard as bluetooth is in 2.4ghz WiFi range which has a lot of antenna options) but that being said it is not going to help you unless it is very close by.
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You can embrace new computing technology and change with it or cling to past and fall further behind everyday....
AA4PB
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« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2016, 09:51:31 AM »

Their own spec sheet gives a maximum range of 100 feet.
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W8JX
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« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2016, 11:35:48 AM »

Their own spec sheet gives a maximum range of 100 feet.

There are 3 classes of Blue tooth, Class 3 is rated at "about" 1 meter/3.3 feet, Class 2 about 10 meters/33 feet and Class 1 is "rated" at 100 meters/330 feet. These ratings are generally paths with little obstruction in signal path and size/type of antennas is a factor. Some rate range as less for marketing reasons so buyer have lower expectations when buy them are less likely to be disappointed. With good antenna(s) and no obstructions Class 1 can easily see a 2 to 3x range increase.
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You can embrace new computing technology and change with it or cling to past and fall further behind everyday....
ONAIR
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Posts: 2563




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« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2016, 05:53:08 PM »

Interesting!  I also heard that the next generation of rigs may have voice recognition technology similar to today's smartphones, that could enable us to circumvent the menus and program the radios via speech!!  Smiley
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K7AAT
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Posts: 438




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« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2016, 09:00:56 AM »

   I recently misplaced my iPad, but was easily able to locate it via the finder app provided by Apple! (I had left it at a restaurant, and had it back within 24 hours.)  Is something like this available for radio equipment?

Your iPad is probably connected to the cellular network....enabling it to communicate from just about anywhere so that it's GPS coordinates can be retrieved.  It is not economically practical to put cellular communications in ham radios.
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KA0SBL
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« Reply #9 on: April 07, 2016, 01:48:24 PM »

   I recently misplaced my iPad, but was easily able to locate it via the finder app provided by Apple! (I had left it at a restaurant, and had it back within 24 hours.)  Is something like this available for radio equipment?


We 'lost', er, had stolen an iPhone in Chinle Arizona while visiting nearby Canyon DeChelly in the Navajo Nation. Using the iPad, we tracked it to a specific residence and had connectivity just long enough to lock it out, rendering the absconder's new found toy essentially a brick. We contacted the police and they did visit the home, but the residents denied any knowledge. Officer told us that was the end of any recovery attempts.  :/

They do make GPS tracking devices for pets that work through the cell grid. Waterproof, shock resistant and designed to be small enough for a dog to wear, think Lo-Jack for Fido. One could possibly install it in a radio if there's enough room inside. You'd need to make provisions to charge it and I'm not sure how well the signal would penetrate a metal enclosure.

-K
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KG4RUL
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« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2016, 05:00:56 AM »

I don't think the issue is "can it be done".  The issue is "is it affordable to do"?  I would not pay extra for that capability built into my gear.
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WX7G
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Posts: 6911




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« Reply #11 on: May 12, 2016, 01:29:27 PM »

   I recently misplaced my iPad, but was easily able to locate it via the finder app provided by Apple! (I had left it at a restaurant, and had it back within 24 hours.)  Is something like this available for radio equipment?

They do make GPS tracking devices for pets that work through the cell grid. Waterproof, shock resistant and designed to be small enough for a dog to wear, think Lo-Jack for Fido. One could possibly install it in a radio if there's enough room inside. You'd need to make provisions to charge it and I'm not sure how well the signal would penetrate a metal enclosure.
-K


My cat wears a GPS tracker and the pertinent tracker specs specs are:

1. $10 a month for its cell phone number.
2. Battery life of 2-3 days.
3. It would need to be outside the radio to communicate.
4. It shows its location on a map to about 10 meters accuracy.

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AC7CW
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Posts: 545




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« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2016, 09:39:03 AM »

hmm... a rig that has a computer connection could report it's location and maybe not even a gps would be required. Locations of a lot of wifi sources are mapped, no? The same rig could install a virus into any computer but the owner's too but that's a whole 'nuther discussion...
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