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Author Topic: Starting into CW  (Read 29212 times)
AE7UT
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Posts: 69




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« Reply #15 on: April 16, 2013, 12:14:17 PM »

John glad to see another slow-coder out there.  I've been doing CW for about a year and can comfortably send/receive at 12 WPM.  I used numerous ways of learning and I think each one helped.

I think calling CW is very time/location dependent.  I usually am on at night and can call CQ for an hour with no reply.  If I get on in daylight hours it usually takes two or three CQs and I get answered.  I usually hang out on the old novice bands or the SKCC QRS watering holes.  I hope to hear you soon.  PM e-mail me if you want those freqs. 

73
Stan AE7UT
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2805




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« Reply #16 on: April 16, 2013, 04:20:03 PM »

I don't know of anyone who has learned CW the way you are going about it.
CW is about "critical listening" and associating a sound with a character and putting it down on a word processor or pad. Eventually it gets to "head copy" where one can hear CW as words. I don't think you will hone that skill "visually".

Don't take my word for it, search the forum or google "learning Morse code".

I've been working on the skill for nearly a year before I ventured to do any QSOs just recently. Do what you want, but I'm just saying that there is no such thing as a shortcut with AR CW!

As far as visual use of Morse code, consider the Navy Signalmen/Quartermasters.  They don't hear any code unless the two searchlights being used are close enough to hear the shutters.  And yet they are able to copy the flashing light just fine.  A good sending speed for them, however, is around 12-15 WPM, limited by the amount of friction in the shutter movement.  I don't know what their required speed is for receiving these days, but when I was on active duty, the Senior and Master Chief Signalmen seemed impressed that I, fresh out of Radioman school, could copy flashing light as fast as they could send it.  Including two misspelled words that I pointed out.  "Dammit, Bailey!  I threw those in on purpose and you caught both of them!  You can be a Signalman on my bridge any time you're not on watch in Radio!"
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
GILGSN
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Posts: 205




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« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2013, 03:23:07 PM »

Here is a simpler explanation on how to zero-beat with Fldigi:

- Send a few dits and dahs..
- Note the frequency of your dits and dahs on the waterfall.
- When listening to a signal, adjust your radio frequency so that the frequency of the received audio on the waterfall matches the one you noted previously on the waterfall when sending.

Basically, you align the audio tone frequency of the received station to your tone frequency on the waterfall using you radio HF frequency knob.

That's it.

Gil.
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M0JHA
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Posts: 646




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« Reply #18 on: April 24, 2013, 07:05:59 AM »

Just buy a KX3 and join the other stampeed of new cw ops who are raping the art ...
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GILGSN
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Posts: 205




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« Reply #19 on: April 24, 2013, 10:36:07 AM »

Quote
Just buy a KX3 and join the other stampeed of new cw ops who are raping the art ...

What do you mean?

Gil.
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M0JHA
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Posts: 646




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« Reply #20 on: April 24, 2013, 01:10:26 PM »

Only i have had quite a few "qso's" with people who have bought a KX3 , utilise the reader and think they are morse ops . I had to tell one guy yesterday i simply couldn't read what he was sending . On more than one occasion i have heard people state when the KX3 comes out they are "going to do a bit of cw"  Huh

What i'm saying is why do people want to be morse ops but can't be arsed to sit and learn it first . I can't see the attraction of listening to a load of noise you can't understand only to sit reading a screen and then  1 , send something back using a key that they should be jailed for or 2, type it out and let a pc send it .



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GILGSN
Member

Posts: 205




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« Reply #21 on: April 24, 2013, 02:08:38 PM »

Quote
Only i have had quite a few "qso's" with people who have bought a KX3 , utilise the reader and think they are morse ops .

Understood, and I agree. However, they only miss-out for themselves, and really do not "rape the art." The more interest in Morse, the better. Even if it is through decoders. I don't understand the motivation, but again, I don't understand contests either. Both just seem plain weird to me. Someone starting like that might want to learn it better. It is not the best way to go I believe, but to each his own. As to bad senders, I just ignore them.. I have a KX3 and used the microphone only once, so check if it was working, not once since then. I don't read the screen when receiving because I am busy trying to decode with my brain. I guess I'm just not good at multitasking.. So, if someone wants to learn inefficiently, so be it, they're not hurting anyone but themselves...

Gil.
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2E0OZI
Member

Posts: 270




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« Reply #22 on: April 27, 2013, 09:44:41 AM »

IC718 don't read no morse... Grin But my coffee soaked and cold addled brain does and a I just made a contact with RA2FF in Kaliningrad (Sergei) straight key all the way baby!  Wink

I too don't see the attraction of these reader doohickies and I am a morse newbie.
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Men can only be happy when they do not assume that the object of life is happiness.
George Orwell
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1716




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« Reply #23 on: April 27, 2013, 12:24:54 PM »

  I'm still waiting for an automatic SSB translator to come out so I can figure out the purpose of whats being said other than 5 by 9 or WX reports.
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M0JHA
Member

Posts: 646




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« Reply #24 on: April 28, 2013, 02:58:01 AM »

SSB , There is no need for language like that   Smiley
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N5XM
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Posts: 242




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« Reply #25 on: April 28, 2013, 05:31:29 AM »

Congrats on making the decision to learn CW.  There are always going to be some folks who have lousy things to say, but don't worry about that.  The brain is an amazing thing and can adapt to many things.  It just takes time, effort, patience, and persistence.  Work on it every day, and if you need a day off sometimes, take it.  Practice in an organized fashion, and remember that everyone has setbacks.  Don't let this discourage you.  Listen to the w1aw code practice...they start out fast and gradually slow down.  By the time the speed gets significantly slower yo will find that you hear the characters better.  Most of all, enjoy the process and develop a love of CW, and I think this may be the key.  When you love something it isn't work.  Good luck and keep after it!  Rick, n5xm.  
« Last Edit: April 28, 2013, 05:34:09 AM by N5XM » Logged
BOJANY
Member

Posts: 6




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« Reply #26 on: April 29, 2013, 12:34:31 PM »

Hi.
My experience is such that I started to learn CW on February 2012 and by the September 2012 I managed to learn all characters+nubers+few special signs (., ,  and /). It helped a lot to be in a group and have practice twice a week. Now after 6 month of end of the course I am able to copy/send at around 25WPM. But the point is, if you want to learn you need to practice. I am practicing almost every day (almost meaning every day, skipping only few days per month) using LCWO.net and it pays off.
Enjoying the hobby and just listening to CW on the band also helps a lot. Just listen and try to decode. Usually QSO's are almost the same or at least wery similar so when you can predict things decoding becomes easier Smiley

Don't give up and keep practicing!

Regards, Bojan
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KC8Y
Member

Posts: 244




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« Reply #27 on: May 26, 2013, 06:00:09 PM »

I'm handicapped, also use FLDIGI for digital modes because of it.  Use & enjoy the Olivia mode, BUT now want to try CW. 

I've been in ham radio communications for over 40+ years; always did love CW and I want to get into using it again, BUT I can only go at about 8-wpm and MUST use machine-code for xmtg & rcvg.

I have a rare form of MS: tay sach, muscle atrophy and sporadic memory impairment

Keep up the work, John
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3860




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« Reply #28 on: May 26, 2013, 06:10:31 PM »

John:  I'm always curious about physical infirmities and what can and cannot be done with specific ones.

If you don't mind...... I'd like to know if you've ever tried a keyboard keyer and learned to head copy CW? (It's apparent that you're using a keyboard to post your comments)

The reason for this question is it seems to me that this would create a more fluid and enjoyable contact.

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KQ6Q
Member

Posts: 979




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« Reply #29 on: June 10, 2013, 08:31:02 PM »

When you call CQ, try ending the transmission with AR  - didahdidahdit - which means 'end of transmission' rather than K which means 'go ahead specific station'.  Match your sending speed to the speed of the stations you're hearing - and try tail ending  -when two stations finish their QSO, call the one that didn't say that he was 'Closing Station' - CL - and just send each call once.

Mr rig has a built in keyer, and I have paddles, but I enjoy straight key, and working other people who have straight keys. The folks you're trying to work may be non-responsive because of your computer-sent code.

Fred, KQ6Q
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