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Author Topic: Trouble finding exact Battery Replacement Kenwood TS-950SD S/N 1010625 CR2430  (Read 24337 times)
AC5UP
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« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2013, 05:10:59 PM »

It's know solder, not no solder.........................    Grin
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K0IC
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« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2013, 02:27:14 AM »

What is wrong with a battery holder inside or outside the radio?  I plan to do that with my TS-140S.  I have heard of other hams doing that.  I think it is too dangerous to solder to lithium batteries.
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KE3WD
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« Reply #17 on: May 05, 2013, 06:07:11 AM »

What is wrong with a battery holder inside or outside the radio?  I plan to do that with my TS-140S.  I have heard of other hams doing that.  I think it is too dangerous to solder to lithium batteries.

The battery holder method works fine for me, depending upon the customer's wishes. 

Good quality double-sided foam mounting tape can be used to affix the holder somewhere and does a good, quick job of it.  I like to also add a small bead of hot glue around the edges, if possible, for that extra bit of mounting confidence. 

73
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KE3WD
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« Reply #18 on: May 05, 2013, 06:12:59 AM »

If you have ever experienced an Li battery meltdown and fire situation, you likely would not ever try to solder to one again. 

The problem is that the Li technology cells can make their own oxygen once the catastrophic ppoint is reached via temp overheat and that results in an incredible fire that won't stay out once the extinguisher is deployed.  Looks like the fire is out -- and then it starts again. 

Yours truly once had an Li batt, larger than a coin cell, around the size of a C battery, start a fire that rather quickly burned a hole straight thru the masonite AND the steel sheet top of a testbench.  We rather hurriedly dragged the whole thing out of the highbay garage to the outside, where it just sat there and burned brightly until the cell was finished with its ugly demonstration. 

We had the good old Halon extinguishers there, too. 

But each time the extinguisher seemed to have put the fire out -- the darned thing would proceed to re-ignite. 

73
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W8JX
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« Reply #19 on: May 05, 2013, 03:00:51 PM »

Chemistry/understanding reactions is neat. Even simple finely ground aluminum and iron oxide which are normally considered harmless alone and yet when mixed and a proper ignition source is provided it burns with a such ferocity (over 6000 degrees) that it will melt through any known metal when burning. 
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You can embrace new computing technology and change with it or cling to past and fall further behind everyday....
WI8P
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« Reply #20 on: May 06, 2013, 07:52:54 AM »

While the discussion on soldering lithium batteries has been interesting, did anyone notice the OP never came back to reply?  I wonder if he ever found what he was looking for.   Huh
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N4ATS
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« Reply #21 on: May 06, 2013, 02:10:17 PM »

Probably not since the thread was so derailed, common problem
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K2MR
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« Reply #22 on: November 29, 2015, 11:18:05 AM »

FYI, the CR2430-FT1 has another name also- Comp-1-3SANYO   They can be found at Batterymart.com for $4.95 and $1.98 shipping. Figured this info might be helpful. 73 K2ME 
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W9GB
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« Reply #23 on: November 29, 2015, 02:57:53 PM »

Here is that BatteryMart web page: COMP-1-3 (Sanyo CR2430-FT)
http://www.batterymart.com/p-comp-1-3-sanyo-cr2430-ft-battery.html

Panasonic bought out SANYO (2008-2010),
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanyo
the SANYO brand name for lithium batteries was discontinued a couple of years ago.
Part numbers were changed, especially usage of the "suffix" alpha-numerics for solder tabs.

Digi-Key P661-ND (CR2450/G1AN) may be a suitable substitute, at $1.83
This coin cell has 620 mAh capacity (greater than original 270 mAh)
http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/CR-2450%2FG1AN/P661-ND/2404066

CR2450 solder tab version: Panasonic Line Drawing with measurements
http://industrial.panasonic.com/lecs/www-data/pdf2/AAA4000/AAA4000DE105.pdf

====
Panasonic Lithium Coin Cells (CR-series).
http://www.digikey.com/catalog/en/partgroup/cr-coin-series/3437?mpart=CR-2450%2FH1AN&vendor=11&WT.z_ref_page_type=PS&WT.z_ref_page_sub_type=PD&WT.z_ref_page_id=PD&WT.z_ref_page_event=DC_Link_Table
« Last Edit: November 29, 2015, 03:00:44 PM by W9GB » Logged
WA2ISE
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« Reply #24 on: November 29, 2015, 04:04:07 PM »

The OP didn't want any hacks, (maybe there was no room in the rig?) but if he was willing to, he could use a battery holder for a commonly available battery (seems CR2032's breed like rabbits in my shack) to solder in, without getting the battery hot.  I did this in my TS440SAT.   I got a holder from a scrap PC motherboard.  But I'm a junkbox junkie...  Grin
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KA5IPF
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« Reply #25 on: November 29, 2015, 04:30:38 PM »

The OP was 2.5 yrs ago......

Why use a battery holder for a battery that has to be changed about every 25 years?Huh??
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WA2ISE
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« Reply #26 on: November 29, 2015, 06:11:26 PM »

... a battery that has to be changed about every 25 years?Huh??

Hard to believe a battery could last that long...   Huh
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KA5IPF
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« Reply #27 on: November 29, 2015, 08:39:16 PM »

Believe it. I see TS430's all the time with an original battery, still full voltage and they are 35 years old. Same for the replacement TS440S. Numerous other 20-30 year old radios. The 741's (1991) and 742's are starting to die. Different battery and circuitry. The TS850's are still running on original batteries, think 1991 again. I replace more due to leakage than low voltage.
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VE3TMT
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« Reply #28 on: December 02, 2015, 10:57:48 AM »

I had a similar problem with a Kenwood mobile many years ago. I removed tabs from dead battery and soldered them to a replacement. If you lightly sand with a fine grit the surface and use flux it goes pretty easy.

You might rethink your procedure;
1. Soldering damages the battery (see Panasonic bulletin regarding same)
2. It can explode (I wouldn't want to be the one that suggested soldering and having someone loose an eye)

Clif

You are a wise man Clif.

I did just that, except loosing the eye part. I was trying to solder tabs on to a new battery for the TS940. The damn thing exploded in my face. Fortunately I wear glasses, which probably saved my sight. Scared the bajesus out of me. I'll never, ever do that again.

Now that I think about it, I said that after taking 800V from my FT101. As if once wasn't enough, did it again. Then there's the time I fired up the amp with the safety cage removed. I know what 2400V to ground sounds like. So does the wife!

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W9GB
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« Reply #29 on: December 02, 2015, 12:28:15 PM »

Quote from: KA5IPF
Believe it. I see TS430's all the time with an original battery, still full voltage and they are 35 years old.
Same for the replacement TS440S.
I have observed same as Clif.  
In fact, the only reason that I changed the last one (TS-440S), due to leakage at the edge of the coin cell.  
I cleaned area, but fortunately the leakage had not reached the ICs or PC board.
That battery still had full voltage, even with a bit of leakage.

The correct part is "dirt cheap" ~ $1.00 and "fresh" (toll road transponders use same coin cell).
Those are rated for 10+ years of transponder usage.

When you by a retail packaged coin cell, you really don't know its age -- unless marked.
The very cheap ones are usually very old stock.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2015, 12:32:49 PM by W9GB » Logged
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