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Author Topic: Daisy Chain of ground rods  (Read 4435 times)
W5WSS
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« Reply #15 on: May 02, 2013, 04:22:23 AM »

Thanks Chris, yes I agree and again by all means Bond the rods together.

73
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NW6V
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Posts: 10




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« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2013, 07:43:38 AM »

Thanks to all.

And in particular: thanks to Chris KF7P for the reference to W8JI's document (and of course thanks to W8JI for the document! I'll be at "better but not perfect" on day 1 (hopefully by dinner time today :-)

BTW, that "optional" bonded run from tower to grounding system in the middle of the run perfectly illustrates my setup.

I hope others will find these posts in the future: I found lots of links listing and explaining the relevant parts of the NEC, but W8JI's material gives great examples of the practical implementation of that code, which is what was needed to have that info click into focus.

I'll be adding control line suppressors and a grounded and protected power strip in the coming weeks (Don't be surprised if I order from KF7P :-). I'm not in a super hurry on this next stage because I live in such a low-probability lightning area; it will be completed in the next month or two - as soon as the CC gets recharged...

Finally, if you're doing grounding I suggest a visit to http://www.kf7p.com and in particular to http://www.kf7p.com/KF7P/Tech_Resources.html. In honesty, everything I needed is on this list.

Even someone who's been a ham for 52 years needs "Elmering" once in a while.

73, Chris NW6V

 

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N4CR
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Posts: 1655




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« Reply #17 on: May 02, 2013, 05:51:09 PM »

It's worth it to do it right.

I have a classic Single Point Ground at the entrance to my shack.

Last Tuesday night, I suspect my Cushcraft R-8 was struck by lightning. SWR is infinite on that coax on all bands.

I haven't gotten to troubleshooting it because it's been raining every day since, but all of my radio gear survived just fine. I can only imagine that my R-8 matching box is trashed, my coax has been perforated along it's long run (tied to a long fence line pole) or the polyphaser is shorted.

I have 6 ground rods spread over about a 100' linear run and my shack is right in the middle. The tie to the house ground is 50' to one end, termination to the fence line is at the other end. There is a ground stake driven on each end, one at the base of my 2 meter push up pole and 3 in front of the shack spread out 15' and on center. Very similar to the long and narrow ground rod system you are referring to.

Of course, it's anecdotal evidence, but it did destroy the antenna system and didn't destroy the shack, so for me, it did what it was supposed to do.

Spend your time and do it right. It's much better if you keep the high energy stuff outside.

I wish it would stop raining...
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73 de N4CR, Phil

We are Coulomb of Borg. Resistance is futile. Voltage, on the other hand, has potential.
K2GWK
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« Reply #18 on: May 04, 2013, 07:29:26 PM »

Just bond it to the closest ground rod.  You've already taken adequate grounding measures of using three rods, now keep the bonding runs as short as possible to minimize resistance.  I believe you'll find that the theory of having one central ground rod that everything is connected to is just that--a theory.  As long as all ground rods are bonded together and bonding runs are kept as short as possible, your grounding system will work as you intend.

You could not be more wrong. Ever hear of ground loops or ground currents? They are a source of noise. It's recommended to use one point for ground for a reason and it is based on factual data. Angry
« Last Edit: May 04, 2013, 07:31:42 PM by K2GWK » Logged

K2GWK Website

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K1CJS
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« Reply #19 on: May 05, 2013, 08:13:47 AM »

You could not be more wrong. Ever hear of ground loops or ground currents? They are a source of noise. It's recommended to use one point for ground for a reason and it is based on factual data. Angry

In YOUR opinion.  Daisy chaining is not 'looping' ground connections.  I suppose you think a ground halo is 'looping' grounds too.  Many stations use several ground rods to increase their protection, especially commercial stations--and most of those use a building ground halo.

I think we had this discussion on another thread with you before, and I'm not going to go through it again.  It's sufficient to say that you had little idea what you were saying before--and still don't.  
« Last Edit: May 05, 2013, 08:18:07 AM by K1CJS » Logged
K2GWK
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« Reply #20 on: May 06, 2013, 12:05:39 PM »

You could not be more wrong. Ever hear of ground loops or ground currents? They are a source of noise. It's recommended to use one point for ground for a reason and it is based on factual data. Angry

In YOUR opinion.  Daisy chaining is not 'looping' ground connections.  I suppose you think a ground halo is 'looping' grounds too.  Many stations use several ground rods to increase their protection, especially commercial stations--and most of those use a building ground halo.

I think we had this discussion on another thread with you before, and I'm not going to go through it again.  It's sufficient to say that you had little idea what you were saying before--and still don't.  

I am going to chalk up your response to the fact that you are not too bright. Ground loops have absolutely nothing to do with looping ground connections. Ground loops refer to a current, almost always unwanted, in a conductor connecting two points that are supposed to be at the same potential, in this case ground. That is why you want all of your grounds to connect at one place, so they are all at the same potential. Any difference of potential across a conductor will allow a current flow. The ground currents can manifest themselves as noise. Kapish?HuhHuhHuhHuhHuh
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K2GWK Website

Stupidity for Dummies (http://stupidityfordummies.com/)

…because sometimes, you just can’t dumb it down enough…
K2GWK
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« Reply #21 on: May 07, 2013, 01:25:33 PM »

I also have provided the link below which explains why a single point ground system is critical for protection when it comes to lightning strikes.

Ham Radio Now presentation on Lightning and Ground:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_sKDuwQA_p0
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K2GWK Website

Stupidity for Dummies (http://stupidityfordummies.com/)

…because sometimes, you just can’t dumb it down enough…
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