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Author Topic: SBE Model 33 and 34  (Read 7423 times)
KB9WMG
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Posts: 5




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« on: June 29, 2001, 07:57:18 AM »

Anyone have any experience or knowledge of SBE (Side Band Engineers) models 33 and 34 HF rigs?  
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KA1DBE
Member

Posts: 122




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« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2001, 09:07:24 AM »

I own an SBE 34.  Very interesting rig....one of the first Hybrid rigs of the '60s.  I use mine every once in a while just to keep everything working properly....never tried it mobile but it will run on 12v (large current draw though!!)  Let me know what questions you have about it and maybe I can answer them for you.

73's
Jeff, KA1DBE/4
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KL7IPV
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Posts: 984




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« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2001, 12:19:46 AM »

I used to have a SBE 33 in the late 60s. I still have an AC power cord for it. Was a nifty little rig and I thought it looked good too. It went away as I upgraded radios and moved.  I never had a SBE 34 so can't tell you much about it. The SBE 33 had easy tuning but I never used it mobile. The output was okay for the time and would be okay in today's market too, I think.
73,
Frank
KL7IPV
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N5TN
Member

Posts: 3




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« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2001, 05:28:19 PM »

I had an SBE34 in the 70's when I lived in Venezuela, and used it mostly mobile.  I remember a QSO with an Italian ham when other fixed local stations could not raise him. It was a good rig, although I remember the output stage to be critical in its tuning.
73, Carlos.
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W2KWN
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Posts: 5




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« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2001, 12:39:37 AM »

Hi - this is "Red" in Sacramento, CA.

  I got my SB-33 in early 1963, and I carried it with me while I was in the USAF and operated as DL4ZK in Germany, HS3RE in Thailand, and TF2KWN in Iceland.  I used the little transceiver as my primary rig until the summer of 1986, when the Collins mechanical filter ruptured and I had to replace it with another that had a narrower passband, and the audio then had a very limited range and was quite disagreeable.  By that time, technology had leapfrogged the SB-33 multiple times and I retired it honorably (and still have it).

   It was a creature of its times:  It is strictly a voice (selectable USB/LSB) transceiver.  Its power intput to the pair of PL-500s in the final is 125 Watts.  Bear in mind, that's input (not output), and with a linear device (amplifier), 50% efficiency isn't far off the mark, so power output is right around 60 - 65 Watts PEP on 80, 40, and 20.  On 15, it was slightly less, probably around 50 Watts output.  The second consideration is that its coverage reflects the voice segments of the bands as they existed when it was manufactured in the early 60's.  It does not tune down into the CW segments, and tunes only a 200 KC segment of each band that it covers:  3.8-4.0; 7.15 - 7.35; 14.2-14.4, 21.25-21.45MC.

   I have a warm feeling about the 23 years I used the little rig.  Sure, it has its drawbacks.  The one which probably makes it a less desireable item in todays scheme of things is its annoying tendancy to drift a bit shortly after it's turned on.  Its built-in 110VAC power supply and speaker were also handy.  When you picked it up, it was all there.  All you had to provide was the Mic.

   If there are any other questions you might have of a more specific nature, I still have its operating and maintenance data and would be glad to share it with you.

Red Erickson - w2kwn@juno.com
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N6AJR
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Posts: 9930




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« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2001, 06:35:10 PM »

Had a 33 and now own a 34, they are just what they were made for, a good compromise.  They were designed to be an all in one radio station that you could take with you and use easily on SSB only. Sort of like an early FT 817, if you know what I mean.  In todays market they are a bit underpowered and don't have the the output of the newer rigs,  you are limited to the SSB bands that were in use in the 1960's for frequencies, and they don't have particulary good recievers.  I keep mine as a toy from the past and enjoy using it now and then, but a Ft 101ee has a much better reciever, and is almost a sensitive as todays rigs, and the SBE are not.  So as a "Portable ", all in one radio, they did what they were designed for, but not the best choice as an only radio for a station today.  73  tom N6AJR
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WA5TAW
Member

Posts: 2




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« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2002, 02:45:24 AM »

Do you still have the AC cord for the SBE33?  If so, can beg, buy, borrow, or steal it from you?  Also could use a manual.
Thanks, Don
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WA5TAW
Member

Posts: 2




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« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2002, 02:49:39 AM »

Hi Red,
I have an SBE33 which I was given about ten years ago and have finally retired and have time to play with it.  My e-mail is dgraham@express56.com and I would like to hear from you about how to connect the AC.  I currently have no manual or diagrams.  Can you help?
Thanks, Don
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PA3GMP
Member

Posts: 75




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« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2007, 05:56:11 AM »

Last week I was given an SBE model 33. It's been around (read: several hams with good intentions and bad skills tried to fix it, mainly by misaligning everything) and the last owner plugged it into 240V (it's a 117V rig with the finals being fed directly out of the mains voltage through a voltage tripler, if memory serves). He switched it off "immediately after the bang". So I've got a restoration project on my hands. The biggest challenge will be to find replacements for the germanium semiconductors, all of which probably have blown.

But even without having operated it, I'm already in love with this rig. I don't know why, I just love it. It'll be my first real boat anchor restoration, but I've got the circuit diagrams and I know at least two hams with experience in this sort of job, so I'm sure I'll get it back on the air again.

73 Frank PA3GMP/ZS6TMV
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KL7JV
Member

Posts: 3




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« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2016, 08:48:58 PM »

I have the matching amplifier (SB1-LA) for the SB33 Transceiver. I looking to sell the amplifier for $200, or buy a SBE SB33 transceiver.

Please Contact me,

William
KL7JV
williamjhobart@gmail.com
907-355-6400 Alaska
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