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Author Topic: ARRL Antenna Book  (Read 2604 times)
KA4NMA
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Posts: 319




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« on: May 17, 2013, 12:39:28 PM »

I have volume 18.  Is it worth it to get the latest edition?

Randy Ka4nma
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W0FM
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Posts: 2054




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« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2013, 01:00:49 PM »

Hi Randy,

I am one who likes to keep the "latest and greatest" tools on hand, but I would not purchase the newest Antenna Handbook if I already had one that was less than five or ten years old.  The most basic theory of antennas goes back a gazillion years and is not likely to change much.  The newer Handbooks I have looked over have updated drawings and somewhat better photos for the most part, but the formulas and graphs are basically the same.  You can learn to understand antennas by reading the 1968 version of the Handbook or the very latest one.

That said, there are always a few "nuggets" in each new addition and I try to get my hands on one for a quick preview just in case there is something new.  But, generally not worth the price of a whole new book.

73,

Terry, WØFM
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W4VR
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« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2013, 02:31:10 PM »

Hi Randy,

I am one who likes to keep the "latest and greatest" tools on hand, but I would not purchase the newest Antenna Handbook if I already had one that was less than five or ten years old.  The most basic theory of antennas goes back a gazillion years and is not likely to change much.  The newer Handbooks I have looked over have updated drawings and somewhat better photos for the most part, but the formulas and graphs are basically the same.  You can learn to understand antennas by reading the 1968 version of the Handbook or the very latest one.

That said, there are always a few "nuggets" in each new addition and I try to get my hands on one for a quick preview just in case there is something new.  But, generally not worth the price of a whole new book.


73,

Terry, WØFM

Good comments.  I agree.  I buy a new one about once every ten years.  I also use EZNEC 5+ and find that most of the antennas in the antenna book are in the eznec library.
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KA4NMA
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Posts: 319




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« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2013, 07:49:01 PM »

Thanks!  I will save my money for something else.

Randy
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K1CJS
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Posts: 5983




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« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2013, 05:18:41 AM »

I also agree.  However, if there is a store near you that carries ARRL publications, you could pop in there and  glance through the newest edition to see if there is anything that catches your eye, then get the book if there is.

I know that most of us either get ours through the mails directly, but if you can find a nearby store that carries ARRL materials, you can possibly save money by getting your stuff there.  73!
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KC8Y
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Posts: 239




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« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2013, 05:48:12 AM »

I totally agree with all the comments about the ARRL Antenna Book.  Just attained the 2012 version (been about 12-years for me). Details & formulas HAVEN'T changed, at all; just adds & costs !!!!

I'm 61-years old, licensed 43-years and an EE
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K0ZN
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Posts: 1543




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« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2013, 08:52:51 AM »

Actually, there are some nice charts and graphs in some of the older....like early 1970 and before books that are quite handy and not in the newer books.
There is also a lot more info on phased arrays in the older books. There also may be a little bit more on practical matching networks, etc. since back in those
days more people built antennas, matching networks and tuners, etc. I am not saying those books are better....they do lack some of the "good stuff" in the new
books, but the chapters on basic antenna theory and many of the how to articles are worth having. Those old books can be had very cheaply at hamfests and
Ebay, etc. Having a series of antenna books spread over quite a few years is handy, but it is not a life changer.

The sad thing is how darn expensive the new books are getting. I agree with the 10 year spacing between Antenna books unless money is not an object.

FYI: another very good book is "Low Band DXing" by ON4UN. It is also from the ARRL.  Basically an antenna book. Excellent.
Actually, I kind of like his first two books the best in terms of construction articles. If you can find one of those cheap, I would jump on it.

73,  K0ZN
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N6AJR
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Posts: 9913




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« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2013, 12:25:16 PM »

But,  ( here is the drum roll, wait for it, wait for it...) some of the new ones come with a CD with all the stuff on it like the free stuff you can down load off the net such as modeling software.   
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W0FM
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Posts: 2054




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« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2013, 11:41:29 AM »

Tom,

I hope I can speak for all of us drummers in the world when I say that you just can't beat a perfectly placed drum roll in any comment!

But the drum roll MUST end with something like:  Ka-da-thump-bump!  CRASH!  ;o)

Terry, WØFM
« Last Edit: June 17, 2013, 11:51:51 AM by W0FM » Logged
AD4U
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Posts: 2157




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« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2013, 12:22:15 PM »

The laws of physics regarding relatively simple amateur radio antennas have not changed in many years.

Dick  AD4U
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VE5EIS
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Posts: 52


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« Reply #10 on: June 17, 2013, 01:27:01 PM »

The laws of physics regarding relatively simple amateur radio antennas have not changed in many years.

Since the Big Bang - and arguably, perhaps not even then.
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KA5N
Member

Posts: 4380




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« Reply #11 on: June 18, 2013, 03:44:46 AM »

What is true for the Antenna Handbook is also true for the Handbook.  They both
change so little from year to year that a new one every ten years is good enough.
In fact some of the older Handbooks and Antenna Handbooks have more usefull
information than the newer versions (example: vacuum tube info is in the older
books including tube basing etc. which is usefull when restoring Boat Anchors etc.)
Plus if you drop a handbook on your bare toes better hope it is a old soft cover
lightweight from the 1950-70 era than the newer ten pound dudes.

Allen KA5N
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