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Author Topic: Batteries may be soon obsolete  (Read 5354 times)
W8JX
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« on: May 22, 2013, 10:48:29 AM »

Was doing some tech reading today and it seems that smart money is betting on the "Graphene Super Capacitor" to render batteries obsolete in less than 10 years. Rather than requiring chemical reactions to store and release energy it will simply store massive amounts of electrons. Interesting concept.   
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K1WJ
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« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2013, 11:18:53 AM »

Is this the updated version of the Super Flux Capacitor of the 1980's?HuhHuhHuh 73 K1WJ
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KE3WD
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« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2013, 02:57:19 PM »

There are already some rather intersting things being done with currently available "supercaps" and the future looks bright indeed. 

Here are two videos of a young fellow who has replaced his automobile battery with supercap banks using relatively inexpensive and lightweight supercaps available off shelf from distributors. 

Of course, at this stage of the game, the supercaps can't be used to run things like ham radios for very long, but they CAN and DO hold charge and start the vehicle.  He claims to have tested the system in everyday commuting, etc.  -- But I do expect that there will be breakthroughs on that front forthcoming. 

The supercaps also shorten cranking time considerably, due to their ability to dump more current into the starter and at the same time hold the voltage at the 14VDC point better than lead acid technology. 

Super fast recharge cycle times as compared to lead acid, weight reduction advantage, I think capacitor technology has a bright future. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPJao1xLe7w

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3x_kYq3mHM

Here, the same fellow demonstrates using the capacitor bank to create 120VAC via an inverter and runs a light and a drill with them: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=957u2KNcPVk

Okay, now come the ehams who will comment about not being able to power radios and all...

Stay tuned, that day is very likely coming.


73


73
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W8JX
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« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2013, 09:41:57 PM »

Is this the updated version of the Super Flux Capacitor of the 1980's?HuhHuhHuh 73 K1WJ

No it seems it was discovered by accident by a student in a university lab. I involves layers of carbon one atom thick. Still several years from mass production but is expected to be widely available in 10 years or less.   
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KE7TMA
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« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2013, 03:59:40 PM »

Is this the updated version of the Super Flux Capacitor of the 1980's?HuhHuhHuh 73 K1WJ

No it seems it was discovered by accident by a student in a university lab. I involves layers of carbon one atom thick. Still several years from mass production but is expected to be widely available in 10 years or less.   

I remember, in the early 1990s, reading about how optical computing and 3-d storage cubes were "5-10 years away."

These academic tech timeline estimates are half prognostication, and half grant prospecting.  As with preachers and politicians, you sometimes have to hear what they say, but you don't have to believe it.
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KE4DRN
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« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2013, 06:34:00 PM »

I hope it works out better then the cold fusion those two scientists came up with years ago.

73 james
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VU2NAN
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« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2013, 08:19:46 PM »

Here's more info.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/news/intel-international-science-and-engineering-fair-2013

73,

Nandu.
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VU2NAN
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« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2013, 08:58:22 PM »

And more tech info.

http://www.usc.edu/CSSF//History/2013/Projects/S0912.pdf

73,

Nandu.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2013, 03:56:51 AM »

I wouldn't bet on batteries becoming obsoletequite yet.  After all, the technology cited is in its infancy, and the way things go, there are always some instances where such technology just cannot be used successfully.  Or people who simply rather use the older technology!

As an example, look at the VHS videotape and recorder.  When lazerdisc first came out, there was talk that the tapes were obsolete, yet they were still being used.  Then came CDs and DVDs--and the tapes were still being used.  Now we have DVRs and computer controlled video systems--and yet the VHS tapes and the machines used to play them are still being sold and used--although not at the rate they were before.

No, the statement that batteries will soon be obsolete is fanciful thinking at best.
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KE3WD
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« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2013, 06:51:40 AM »

Was it "fanciful thinking at best" when a few intrepid pioneers were developing ways to create heavier-than-air flying machines? 

Many at the time said and wrote that to be the case. 

Was it "fanciful thinking at best" when one of our presidents tasked the nation to put a man on the moon within the decade? 

Many more were rooting against that.  (Some still try to claim that never happened, despite the overwhelming real evidence that wold prove otherwise easily.)

How about all the naysayers that were positive that radio communications were an impossibility? 

That a Blue LED could never be developed...

Certainly there are announcements of developments that for whatever reason, never make it to being viable, that's not the point. 

The point is that there are *many* pioneering efforts that DO become viable. 

The bottle is half full, not half empty. 


73
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W8JX
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« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2013, 08:40:32 AM »

To be able to store electrons chemical reaction and with 10's of thousand of cycles life.  Also quick charging is possible as well with this new design.
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KD0REQ
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« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2013, 09:40:14 AM »

there is a great difference between works once, works most of the time in the lab, and a production line of tens of thousands of units a week.

we are still between points 1 and 2 above on graphene storage.

and there is an entire government agency way behind on ordering recalls of items in category 3 already.

so we'll see what's on the shelf and what the price is later.  possibly much later.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2013, 11:38:41 AM »

There is a difference between saying a statement is fanciful thinking and a technology is fanciful thinking.

The statement is fanciful thinking, no matter that the technology is probably on it's way to being proven.  The 'lighter than air' machine (the airplane) was fanciful thinking for years--around 2000 of them, AAMOF, before the Wright brothers came along and made it fact.

Please stop, read and comprehend what is meant the next time before biting into a foot entree.
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KE3WD
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« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2013, 02:34:15 PM »

There is a difference between saying a statement is fanciful thinking and a technology is fanciful thinking.

The statement is fanciful thinking, no matter that the technology is probably on it's way to being proven. 

Agreed.  But that is rather an obvious situation IMO.

 
Quote
The 'lighter than air' machine (the airplane) was fanciful thinking for years--around 2000 of them, AAMOF, before the Wright brothers came along and made it fact.

But I was not speaking of all of history (or the cited 2000 years) at all. 

What I typed was: 

Quote
Was it "fanciful thinking at best" when a few intrepid pioneers were developing ways to create heavier-than-air flying machines?

The keywords as to the time or era in question here are, "when a few intrepid pioneers were developing ways to create..."  -- which does not cover anything near those 2000 years, matter of fact it covers a fraction of one century of time measurement. 

Quote
Please stop, read and comprehend what is meant the next time before biting into a foot entree.

The snark from someone who provably did not is amusing.


73
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W8JX
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« Reply #14 on: May 24, 2013, 08:45:36 PM »

there is a great difference between works once, works most of the time in the lab, and a production line of tens of thousands of units a week.

we are still between points 1 and 2 above on graphene storage.

and there is an entire government agency way behind on ordering recalls of items in category 3 already.

so we'll see what's on the shelf and what the price is later.  possibly much later.

It was discovered in a UCLA lab and many in science community see is succeeding and that it will change the way we store power in foreseeable future. The say it is a game changer.
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