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Author Topic: .-.-?  (Read 9478 times)
WX2S
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Posts: 758




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« on: June 01, 2013, 04:27:29 AM »

The Morse code podcast site uses diDAHdiDAH as a separator between quotes in their quote-of-the-day podcasts. (See http://www.morseresource.com/podcasts.php .) Any idea why?

73,
WX2S.
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73, - Steve WX2S.
I subscribe to the DX Code of Conduct. http://dx-code.org/
DJ1YFK
Member

Posts: 193


WWW

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« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2013, 04:44:24 AM »

According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prosigns_for_Morse_code there's a prosign AA (.-.-) meaning "Space down one line (new line)".

I have never heard this in "real life" on the air though, in some languages it could lead to confusion because .-.- also translates to Ä (e. g. for German and Scandinavian languages) or Я in Cyrillic Morse code.

In my ebook2cw software (http://fkurz.net/ham/ebook2cw.html) I decided to use "-...-" to separate paragraphs.

73
Fabian
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20666




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« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2013, 07:51:29 PM »

In "real life," usually dah-di-di-di-dah (BT) is more commonly used.
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2835




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« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2013, 08:11:28 PM »

In military CW procedure (at least as far back as the early 1960s), "AA", sent as one character, was the prosign for "all after".

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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
N3QE
Member

Posts: 2421




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« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2013, 04:10:30 AM »

Someone finds an oddball prosign on Wikipedia and uses it in a strangely typographical way, instead of employing the more common, actually used prosigns and punctuation which are functionally for separating messages.

Interestingly these are the same folks who insist that BT dah-di-di-di-dah is not a functional separator, but instead claim it "really is an equal sign".

Even here there are those who claim that BT is a "double hyphen" or an "equal sign".

Tim.
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W1JKA
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Posts: 1821




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« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2013, 06:07:35 AM »

I claim that BT is a sandwich without Lettuce.
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2835




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« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2013, 08:42:20 AM »

According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prosigns_for_Morse_code there's a prosign AA (.-.-) meaning "Space down one line (new line)".

I have never heard this in "real life" on the air though, in some languages it could lead to confusion because .-.- also translates to Ä (e. g. for German and Scandinavian languages) or Я in Cyrillic Morse code.

In my ebook2cw software (http://fkurz.net/ham/ebook2cw.html) I decided to use "-...-" to separate paragraphs.

73
Fabian

.-.- is also the syllable "ro" in Japanese wabun.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
LB3KB
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Posts: 234


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« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2013, 09:40:15 AM »

Interestingly these are the same folks who insist that BT dah-di-di-di-dah is not a functional separator, but instead claim it "really is an equal sign".

Even here there are those who claim that BT is a "double hyphen" or an "equal sign".

I don't know what sources you have to back up those claims, but I do know what the ITU says about it:
Quote
Double hyphen............................................................... [=] − . . . −


73
LB3KB Sigurd
justlearnmorsecode.com
« Last Edit: June 02, 2013, 09:47:33 AM by LB3KB » Logged
WX2S
Member

Posts: 758




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« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2013, 10:10:09 AM »

This is just a guess, but I would guess that Morseresource.com is using the AA symbol when it sees a linefeed in the text.

73,
Wx2s.
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73, - Steve WX2S.
I subscribe to the DX Code of Conduct. http://dx-code.org/
K8AG
Member

Posts: 352




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« Reply #9 on: June 07, 2013, 11:46:58 AM »

I have a "2-letter call" and frequently ops strain to hear the third letter that just aint there.  I will usually send, for example, CQ Cq Cq de K8AG [AR] signifying I am done with my call don't look for the third letter.  I still have problems sometimes.

73, JP, K8AG [AR] ;-)
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AE5QB
Member

Posts: 273




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« Reply #10 on: June 08, 2013, 04:53:55 PM »

I have a "2-letter call" and frequently ops strain to hear the third letter that just aint there.  I will usually send, for example, CQ Cq Cq de K8AG [AR] signifying I am done with my call don't look for the third letter.  I still have problems sometimes.

73, JP, K8AG [AR] ;-)

JP if that call sign is giving you problems on the air, I suggest you get a new one.  I'll be happy to take that one off of your hands.  Smiley

73

Tom
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3925




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« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2013, 06:40:02 AM »

I have a "2-letter call" and frequently ops strain to hear the third letter that just aint there.  I will usually send, for example, CQ Cq Cq de K8AG [AR] signifying I am done with my call don't look for the third letter.  I still have problems sometimes.

73, JP, K8AG [AR] ;-)

The trick is to sign your call at least twice:

CQ CQ de N2EY N2EY K

(AR goes at the end of a reply to a CQ and at the end of a formal message)

73 de Jim, N2EY
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W5ESE
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Posts: 550


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« Reply #12 on: June 11, 2013, 10:09:04 AM »

I hear that prosign used in CW traffic handling often. It used in the address for the addressee, after the addressee's name and each line of the address. In the American Morse code, [AA] is a comma. The prosign dates from a time when it was customary, when addressing a letter, to put a comma at the end of every line of an address on an envelope.
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KD0OCY
Member

Posts: 17




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« Reply #13 on: July 07, 2013, 10:20:09 PM »

I claim that BT is a sandwich without Lettuce.

That was too funny!
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3996




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« Reply #14 on: July 08, 2013, 09:00:56 AM »

AG: 
Quote
I have a "2-letter call" and frequently ops strain to hear the third letter that just aint there.

You is what you is!  If they have a problem, then they should learn to copy code better! 

There are literally tens of thousands of two-letter suffix calls out there and I can't understand why someone would have to "strain to hear the third letter."

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