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Author Topic: Selecting a generator  (Read 41445 times)
KU7PDX
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« Reply #45 on: November 11, 2013, 01:18:54 PM »

Do you even need a generator, or perhaps a 150-300 watt solar panel and a deep cycle battery would be better? A solar panel, regulator, and a Deep Cycle battery would make zero noise audio or RF wise.
Depends on the charge regulator and/or inverter. Some of those MPPT grid-tie inverters are supposed to be pretty RF-noisy, while the simplest non-switching lead acid charge regulators tend to be less RF-noisy. Switching regulators are a bit of a gamble - perhaps their noise is outside the bands you're going to use, or perhaps you can filter them.
The CirKits SCC3 is a great example of a low-noise solar charge controller. It's not MPPT, but for 200 watts or so it works like a champ!

http://www.cirkits.com/scc3/
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Chris - KU7PDX
K1CJS
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« Reply #46 on: November 11, 2013, 06:24:59 PM »

Anyone who has a spread where they have lawn/garden tools usually have a shed outside to store them in.  It's a simple matter to modify the shed to hold the generator with an extended exhaust pipe through the wall and a aluminum dryer vent hood to provide incoming air.

I had such a setup at my dad's house years ago with a permanent 8-3 cable to the house--about 25 feet away.  It came in handy more than once and never caused a problem with fumes or noise.  BTW, it was an older 7500 watt farm unit.
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W8JX
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« Reply #47 on: November 12, 2013, 03:21:25 PM »

W8JX, do you allow your genset to cool down before refueling?

Running any type of engine inside a garage, open or closed is not a good idea.

But what you do is your business.

We had an older couple running a genset outdoors, problem was they had a window open,
when the furnace was running it pulled in air from the window and the man died from
CO poisoning, the only thing that saved his wife life was she had an oxygen generator in use.

Recommend a good carbon monoxide detector on each floor of any home.

73 james
Thanks, James, for sharing this.  As this tragic example points out, it is very easy to get enough negative pressure differential to draw exhaust gas inside occupied living areas in ways you wouldn't expect.

Again you do not know my garage design and prevailing winds and fact that it has a 36 inch side access door to outside too. No way negative pressure is going yo back it up in house ever. As far as refueling, usually I fill at start off run and it lasts the run but sometimes a refuel while running but before you freak out know that when I do it is with a special jug that cannot over fill by design and it also holds less than tank can handle at time of hot fueling. If you cannot walk and chew bubble gum and use common sense at same time you should not try this though.
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W6EM
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« Reply #48 on: November 12, 2013, 04:03:02 PM »

W8JX, do you allow your genset to cool down before refueling?

Running any type of engine inside a garage, open or closed is not a good idea.

But what you do is your business.

We had an older couple running a genset outdoors, problem was they had a window open,
when the furnace was running it pulled in air from the window and the man died from
CO poisoning, the only thing that saved his wife life was she had an oxygen generator in use.

Recommend a good carbon monoxide detector on each floor of any home.

73 james
Thanks, James, for sharing this.  As this tragic example points out, it is very easy to get enough negative pressure differential to draw exhaust gas inside occupied living areas in ways you wouldn't expect.

Again you do not know my garage design and prevailing winds and fact that it has a 36 inch side access door to outside too. No way negative pressure is going yo back it up in house ever. As far as refueling, usually I fill at start off run and it lasts the run but sometimes a refuel while running but before you freak out know that when I do it is with a special jug that cannot over fill by design and it also holds less than tank can handle at time of hot fueling. If you cannot walk and chew bubble gum and use common sense at same time you should not try this though.
What you don't seem to realize is that this forum is primarily for offering advice to others.  Your example situation may not be what most people would have.  While you may be lucky, someone else might not be. 
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W6EM
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Posts: 812




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« Reply #49 on: November 12, 2013, 04:06:56 PM »

Anyone who has a spread where they have lawn/garden tools usually have a shed outside to store them in.  It's a simple matter to modify the shed to hold the generator with an extended exhaust pipe through the wall and a aluminum dryer vent hood to provide incoming air.

I had such a setup at my dad's house years ago with a permanent 8-3 cable to the house--about 25 feet away.  It came in handy more than once and never caused a problem with fumes or noise.  BTW, it was an older 7500 watt farm unit.
A great approach.  That is, as long as you don't put one of those aluminum hood covers on the ouside wall with a flapper valve (that only opens with positive pressure behind it).  :-)
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W8JX
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Posts: 6047




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« Reply #50 on: November 13, 2013, 03:37:59 AM »

W8JX, do you allow your genset to cool down before refueling?

Running any type of engine inside a garage, open or closed is not a good idea.

But what you do is your business.

We had an older couple running a genset outdoors, problem was they had a window open,
when the furnace was running it pulled in air from the window and the man died from
CO poisoning, the only thing that saved his wife life was she had an oxygen generator in use.

Recommend a good carbon monoxide detector on each floor of any home.

73 james
Thanks, James, for sharing this.  As this tragic example points out, it is very easy to get enough negative pressure differential to draw exhaust gas inside occupied living areas in ways you wouldn't expect.

Again you do not know my garage design and prevailing winds and fact that it has a 36 inch side access door to outside too. No way negative pressure is going yo back it up in house ever. As far as refueling, usually I fill at start off run and it lasts the run but sometimes a refuel while running but before you freak out know that when I do it is with a special jug that cannot over fill by design and it also holds less than tank can handle at time of hot fueling. If you cannot walk and chew bubble gum and use common sense at same time you should not try this though.
What you don't seem to realize is that this forum is primarily for offering advice to others.  Your example situation may not be what most people would have.  While you may be lucky, someone else might not be. 

I do indeed realize it. The problem is a lot of people lack the common sense to use some power equipment. Just because you can buy it, does not mean you know how to use it safely.
 Same with radios and guns too.
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W6EM
Member

Posts: 812




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« Reply #51 on: November 19, 2013, 07:20:25 PM »

W8JX, do you allow your genset to cool down before refueling?

Running any type of engine inside a garage, open or closed is not a good idea.

But what you do is your business.

We had an older couple running a genset outdoors, problem was they had a window open,
when the furnace was running it pulled in air from the window and the man died from
CO poisoning, the only thing that saved his wife life was she had an oxygen generator in use.

Recommend a good carbon monoxide detector on each floor of any home.

73 james
Thanks, James, for sharing this.  As this tragic example points out, it is very easy to get enough negative pressure differential to draw exhaust gas inside occupied living areas in ways you wouldn't expect.

Again you do not know my garage design and prevailing winds and fact that it has a 36 inch side access door to outside too. No way negative pressure is going yo back it up in house ever. As far as refueling, usually I fill at start off run and it lasts the run but sometimes a refuel while running but before you freak out know that when I do it is with a special jug that cannot over fill by design and it also holds less than tank can handle at time of hot fueling. If you cannot walk and chew bubble gum and use common sense at same time you should not try this though.
What you don't seem to realize is that this forum is primarily for offering advice to others.  Your example situation may not be what most people would have.  While you may be lucky, someone else might not be. 

I do indeed realize it. The problem is a lot of people lack the common sense to use some power equipment. Just because you can buy it, does not mean you know how to use it safely.
 Same with radios and guns too.
And, that goes for running it in a garage.  Winds can come up, shifting air flow and setting up situations where CO could find its way into a residence.  Best common sense says, risk losing power, not your life.
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W8JX
Member

Posts: 6047




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« Reply #52 on: November 20, 2013, 03:33:28 AM »

W8JX, do you allow your genset to cool down before refueling?

Running any type of engine inside a garage, open or closed is not a good idea.

But what you do is your business.

We had an older couple running a genset outdoors, problem was they had a window open,
when the furnace was running it pulled in air from the window and the man died from
CO poisoning, the only thing that saved his wife life was she had an oxygen generator in use.

Recommend a good carbon monoxide detector on each floor of any home.

73 james
Thanks, James, for sharing this.  As this tragic example points out, it is very easy to get enough negative pressure differential to draw exhaust gas inside occupied living areas in ways you wouldn't expect.

Again you do not know my garage design and prevailing winds and fact that it has a 36 inch side access door to outside too. No way negative pressure is going yo back it up in house ever. As far as refueling, usually I fill at start off run and it lasts the run but sometimes a refuel while running but before you freak out know that when I do it is with a special jug that cannot over fill by design and it also holds less than tank can handle at time of hot fueling. If you cannot walk and chew bubble gum and use common sense at same time you should not try this though.
What you don't seem to realize is that this forum is primarily for offering advice to others.  Your example situation may not be what most people would have.  While you may be lucky, someone else might not be. 

I do indeed realize it. The problem is a lot of people lack the common sense to use some power equipment. Just because you can buy it, does not mean you know how to use it safely.
 Same with radios and guns too.
And, that goes for running it in a garage.  Winds can come up, shifting air flow and setting up situations where CO could find its way into a residence.  Best common sense says, risk losing power, not your life.

With a partially open garage door maybe but then you have you have a very leaky garage to house door too. Also compared to a car warming up in garage a generator is a very small CO source.
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KB2FCV
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Posts: 1220


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« Reply #53 on: November 20, 2013, 01:27:02 PM »

W8JX, do you allow your genset to cool down before refueling?

Running any type of engine inside a garage, open or closed is not a good idea.

But what you do is your business.

We had an older couple running a genset outdoors, problem was they had a window open,
when the furnace was running it pulled in air from the window and the man died from
CO poisoning, the only thing that saved his wife life was she had an oxygen generator in use.

Recommend a good carbon monoxide detector on each floor of any home.

73 james
Thanks, James, for sharing this.  As this tragic example points out, it is very easy to get enough negative pressure differential to draw exhaust gas inside occupied living areas in ways you wouldn't expect.

Again you do not know my garage design and prevailing winds and fact that it has a 36 inch side access door to outside too. No way negative pressure is going yo back it up in house ever. As far as refueling, usually I fill at start off run and it lasts the run but sometimes a refuel while running but before you freak out know that when I do it is with a special jug that cannot over fill by design and it also holds less than tank can handle at time of hot fueling. If you cannot walk and chew bubble gum and use common sense at same time you should not try this though.
What you don't seem to realize is that this forum is primarily for offering advice to others.  Your example situation may not be what most people would have.  While you may be lucky, someone else might not be. 

I do indeed realize it. The problem is a lot of people lack the common sense to use some power equipment. Just because you can buy it, does not mean you know how to use it safely.
 Same with radios and guns too.
And, that goes for running it in a garage.  Winds can come up, shifting air flow and setting up situations where CO could find its way into a residence.  Best common sense says, risk losing power, not your life.

With a partially open garage door maybe but then you have you have a very leaky garage to house door too. Also compared to a car warming up in garage a generator is a very small CO source.
It's a small CO source, but easily enough to kill. Any time there is a widespread power outage there is always a news story of someone who had one improperly located and kills someone or several people. You need to be careful. Mine is kept pretty far from the house out in open air (ok, it sits under my aluminum rowboat & trailer to keep it out of the rain but far away from the house)
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6042




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« Reply #54 on: November 20, 2013, 01:48:31 PM »

Anyone who has a spread where they have lawn/garden tools usually have a shed outside to store them in.  It's a simple matter to modify the shed to hold the generator with an extended exhaust pipe through the wall and a aluminum dryer vent hood to provide incoming air.

I had such a setup at my dad's house years ago with a permanent 8-3 cable to the house--about 25 feet away.  It came in handy more than once and never caused a problem with fumes or noise.  BTW, it was an older 7500 watt farm unit.
A great approach.  That is, as long as you don't put one of those aluminum hood covers on the ouside wall with a flapper valve (that only opens with positive pressure behind it).  :-)

Right!  The one I used was one that had a mesh screen over the end--no valve, but I think that most sheds don't even need that.  If the shed is one that is well built however, then you should use some sort of vent.  Don't forget to put the exhaust outlet up a ways from the exit hole in the shed too--unless you want a faceful of exhaust gasses when you open the door while the thing is running.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2013, 01:51:07 PM by K1CJS » Logged
W8JX
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Posts: 6047




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« Reply #55 on: November 21, 2013, 04:29:10 AM »

When it was nice out I would place generator in front of house and I made a 2.25 inch hole in wood by entry way to pass cables through when needed and have cover plates for it same color as wood when hole is not in use. I have a automatic change over switch and socket I have not installed yet. I am going to feed it into a sub panel and provide partial power to house circuits of choice so load is also balanced. Many do not realize that a 5kw generator only is rated at 2500 watts per 120v leg for 5k total so load must be balanced.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2013, 05:16:54 AM by W8JX » Logged

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W6EM
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« Reply #56 on: November 26, 2013, 06:48:13 AM »

When it was nice out I would place generator in front of house and I made a 2.25 inch hole in wood by entry way to pass cables through when needed and have cover plates for it same color as wood when hole is not in use. I have a automatic change over switch and socket I have not installed yet. I am going to feed it into a sub panel and provide partial power to house circuits of choice so load is also balanced. Many do not realize that a 5kw generator only is rated at 2500 watts per 120v leg for 5k total so load must be balanced.
I needed a way in and out for occasional use while living in FL in a concrete block home.  I put in a short PVC pipe through the wall with threaded ends on both ends.  I then put threaded pipe caps on both ends.  Kept the vermin out of the house.  Boring a big hole, even with cables, or leaving it open tends to invite unwelcome visitors.  I stuffed the pipe with a rag when cables installed through the pipe.

As for an ATS, unless you also have the gen set permanently installed, an ATS is a waste of money.  Manual transfer switches are usually a lot less.  Make sure that when you do the sub panel install that you have enough extra NM cable on the branch circuits you want to move to it.  That can be a five letter word...... if you don't.
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W8JX
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« Reply #57 on: November 27, 2013, 12:04:48 PM »

When it was nice out I would place generator in front of house and I made a 2.25 inch hole in wood by entry way to pass cables through when needed and have cover plates for it same color as wood when hole is not in use. I have a automatic change over switch and socket I have not installed yet. I am going to feed it into a sub panel and provide partial power to house circuits of choice so load is also balanced. Many do not realize that a 5kw generator only is rated at 2500 watts per 120v leg for 5k total so load must be balanced.
I needed a way in and out for occasional use while living in FL in a concrete block home.  I put in a short PVC pipe through the wall with threaded ends on both ends.  I then put threaded pipe caps on both ends.  Kept the vermin out of the house.  Boring a big hole, even with cables, or leaving it open tends to invite unwelcome visitors.  I stuffed the pipe with a rag when cables installed through the pipe.

As for an ATS, unless you also have the gen set permanently installed, an ATS is a waste of money.  Manual transfer switches are usually a lot less.  Make sure that when you do the sub panel install that you have enough extra NM cable on the branch circuits you want to move to it.  That can be a five letter word...... if you don't.

My ATS waits for one minute after sensing voltage before it transfers to let generator stabilize.
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KF7VXA
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« Reply #58 on: December 10, 2013, 02:28:22 PM »

Refers and freezers tend to work better with an inverter type generator. I've been told, but have no proof that regular generators are harder on the compressors in the freezers.
I do add stabilizer to my fuel and usually add 1/4 premium fuel to 3/4 regular in my stored gas to combat any loss of octaine. Not sure if it helps, but cannot hurt.
The low price HF 2 cycle generators are supposed to run on premium and I use 45 to 1 oil instead of 50 to 1 oil mix. Be sure to keep some extra spark plugs for any 2 stroke gen set.

John
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W8JX
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« Reply #59 on: December 10, 2013, 03:49:16 PM »

Refers and freezers tend to work better with an inverter type generator. I've been told, but have no proof that regular generators are harder on the compressors in the freezers.

Quite the opposite, Inverter generators do not handle surges well.

I do add stabilizer to my fuel and usually add 1/4 premium fuel to 3/4 regular in my stored gas to combat any loss of octaine. Not sure if it helps, but cannot hurt.

I just use 89 octane all the time and no stabilizer.

The low price HF 2 cycle generators are supposed to run on premium and I use 45 to 1 oil instead of 50 to 1 oil mix. Be sure to keep some extra spark plugs for any 2 stroke gen set.

You can use 89, I do. Oil decreases octane and nothing is really gained running it oil rich. I use AmsOil 100 to 1 two stroke oil at a 80 to 1 ratio. Been using it that way in 2 stroke snow blowers, leaf blowers and 2 stroke generators for 3 years now. Wish I had switched years ago. No fouled plugs, no smoke and smoother idling and running.
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