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Author Topic: Selecting a generator  (Read 41535 times)
K3WEC
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« Reply #60 on: December 14, 2013, 12:06:29 PM »

I noticed that the little HF 800-watt 2 cycle generator is again on sale for $90 with coupon.    This is very handy one for smaller requirements, in my experience.
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W8JX
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« Reply #61 on: December 15, 2013, 05:35:12 AM »

I noticed that the little HF 800-watt 2 cycle generator is again on sale for $90 with coupon.    This is very handy one for smaller requirements, in my experience.

Menards has a 1200 watt 4 stroke on sale for 189 that is nearly as quiet as a Honda that cost 3 to 4x more. A friend of mine has one and it is very quiet and easy to carry and sips fuel too.
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W7HBP
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« Reply #62 on: December 17, 2013, 06:38:50 PM »

The Honda's are closer to 4x more watt for watt. Problem with idle down one though is they can sag noticeably under a sudden heavy load.

I have the Honda EU2000i and I also have the Honda EU6500is, they do not sag hardly at all and if they do and voltage varies by too much, the power shuts off to protect the electronics from low voltage or low cycles. And to reset it, you just shut the generator off and restart it. Both Hondas I have are rated for the exact same noise level, super quiet. Great field day generator is the EU2000i.

All Hondas have a carb bowl drain, so after stopping them, long term storage, you can open the bowl drain, this gets almost all the fuel out of the carb. Running it till it dies will leave the carb half full of fuel still. 
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W8JX
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« Reply #63 on: December 18, 2013, 04:37:56 AM »

The Honda's are closer to 4x more watt for watt. Problem with idle down one though is they can sag noticeably under a sudden heavy load.

I have the Honda EU2000i and I also have the Honda EU6500is, they do not sag hardly at all and if they do and voltage varies by too much, the power shuts off to protect the electronics from low voltage or low cycles. And to reset it, you just shut the generator off and restart it. Both Hondas I have are rated for the exact same noise level, super quiet. Great field day generator is the EU2000i.

All Hondas have a carb bowl drain, so after stopping them, long term storage, you can open the bowl drain, this gets almost all the fuel out of the carb. Running it till it dies will leave the carb half full of fuel still. 

I was using my 5500 watt Porter Cable that is rated 9000 watts surge the other day to run a wire welder drawing about 3000 watts. A idle down would have choked on that but it did not even phase my generator and voltage and frequency regulation is excellent. It also uses a Briggs Vangard commercial engine which is built by a division of Toyota in Japan and has a excellent reputation and is considered the engine to have in commercial mowing world. When you have a very high surge rating that means you have a over sized alternator which also adds mass and momentum to take you through sudden loads smoothly as engine adjust to load. Inverter generator do not have that ability and are best with fairly constant loads. I also do not see them shutting down when voltage drops too much as a asset. It shows poor surge capacity.   

As far as a fuel bowl drain I am not sure it is a asset because then you have fuel to catch or drain out. When I put it is storage I shut fuel off and run it dry and I also choke it as it runs out to suck out all the fuel. Been doing it this way for years with no problems.

If you want to pay far more for Honda name you can but you can spend far less and get a quality unit. Even my 6+ year old $200 3k Chonda is still going strong too and always starts on first pull even after sitting for some time.
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WB4M
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« Reply #64 on: December 20, 2013, 08:11:02 AM »

You add up the total wattage everything you will be running and go from there.  Of course you will want headroom.  You didn't mention portability,,  but those generators are quite heavy, even with the wheel assemblies difficult to move.   Someone mentioned those cheap ones from Harbor Freight.. they are 800-900 watts and are 2-stroke engines.  I've seen them as low as $90.00    Some of the "portable" gens in the 5000-7500 watt range are expensive (and loud as hell), and you can buy a generator from Northern Tools that includes a transfer switch that will power your entire house for just a little more.  I would suggest a 1000-2000K such as the small Honda's that sip gas.
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W8JX
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« Reply #65 on: December 20, 2013, 09:41:15 AM »

You add up the total wattage everything you will be running and go from there.  Of course you will want headroom.  You didn't mention portability,,  but those generators are quite heavy, even with the wheel assemblies difficult to move.   Someone mentioned those cheap ones from Harbor Freight.. they are 800-900 watts and are 2-stroke engines.  I've seen them as low as $90.00    Some of the "portable" gens in the 5000-7500 watt range are expensive (and loud as hell), and you can buy a generator from Northern Tools that includes a transfer switch that will power your entire house for just a little more.  I would suggest a 1000-2000K such as the small Honda's that sip gas.

When you want to power a whole house via a transfer switch you want more that a 5k unit. You want 8 or 10k minimum.  The "problem" is that load in house may not be balanced and a 5k unit is rated at 2500 watts each 120 volt leg for 5000 total. With a 8 k or bigger unit you have 4k or more to play with on each leg so balancing is not as critical. 
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