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Author Topic: Bringing Amateur Radio Transceivers and Transmitters to the Philippines  (Read 23353 times)
WB0HZL
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Posts: 24




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« on: June 27, 2013, 01:53:35 AM »

I can not find an answer to the question about how to bring Amateur Radio Equipment, transceivers and transmitters, into the Philippines.  Amateur Radio transceivers and transmitters have to be registered with the National Telecommunications Commission (NTC) and are also listed on your license. I have just recently passed the first of the Amateur Radio license exams and have equipment in the United States that I would like to use here.  There was a lot of discussions when I was studying/applying for my amateur license about the Amnesty Program for unregistered equipment.

If I have the equipment sent here I am worried that it might be confiscated before I can register it with the NTC.  Do I apply for a Permit to Purchase/Possess and have a copy of that packed with the radios and have the original with me when I pick up the package at the Post Office.  I also am aware that a sizable fee is charged by the post office when electronics are sent to the Philippines.

I have asked the local club I belong to, have also inquired with the Philippine Amateur Radio Association and even queried the local NTC office - so far I do not have a definitive answer.  This is frustrating as I have been a ham for over 40 years and operated in West Germany in the early 1980s - no problems getting my equipment into the country. Thanks for any help.

73,
Trent WB0HZL, DW5HT Sad
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KJ4I
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Posts: 111




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« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2013, 04:50:51 PM »

Good luck getting definite answers as I myself have had similar questions in regards to Amateur Radio in the Philippines. I have managed to email the Philippine equivalent of the ARRL and the only answers I have gotten have actually generated more questions with no useful answers. I'm sure someone has some definite information but it sure is not easy to find. Dealing with the Philippine government is one more of a headache and pain in the a$$.
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WB0HZL
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Posts: 24




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« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2013, 05:13:58 PM »

Well the best answer I have gotten so far is to apply for a reciprocal license and list the equipment on the application form - that way there is a record of the equipment on an official document, your transmitting equipment is listed on the license and the license is also a permit to possess. I have most of the information I need for that, but on one radio I do not have the serial number and trying to get my children to check that and send me the information is like dealing with a government agency - hi hi.

So far no simple way to have it just sent to me - guess I will have to get a reciprocal license when I next go back to the US and bring it back with me, of course there are the luggage restrictions when you fly. Undecided

73,
Trent WB0HZL/DW5HT
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KJ4I
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Posts: 111




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« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2013, 12:24:43 PM »

I didn't even realize that having to put the equipment on file was required. Sounds typical of the Philippine government though. I also checked in to just testing and getting a full fledged license there but it sounded like before I could do that I had to prove that I had some type of financial investment in the Philippines before I could proceed. Having to be invested in something before you can do anything else there is so typical of the Philippine government. Almost making it impossible to do anything. Last time I was there I went to apply for an extension on my visa to stay beyond 21 days and that was a half day ordeal and it shouldn't have taken 30 minutes. Sorry, I guess I'm getting a little off the subject but I have had a hard time getting straight answers from them regarding ham radio as well  Undecided
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WB0HZL
Member

Posts: 24




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« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2013, 11:50:10 PM »

I have been here for two years in visitor status and trying to change my status to Alien Resident by marriage - it has been a learning experience. Yes and getting a straight answer is hard at best. The licensing is not that hard just different than in the US and I have been a ham for 45 years. I was surprised that your station equipment is listed on your license and they also require a picture that is also displayed on the license - now back to the topic

I am looking into submitting an "Application to Purchase/Possess" and using that to have one of my radios sent to me. I will let everyone know the outcome. I anyone has questions and do not want to post here I can be reached at WB0HZL at arrl dot net.

73,
Trent WB0HZL/DW5HT
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W4RS
Member

Posts: 64




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« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2013, 12:00:57 PM »

para now handles all amatuer license in the philippines, go to there web site and apply there. now i would not ship by post ffice! use fed ex, ups, or cargo boxes.
du3/w4rs
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KJ4I
Member

Posts: 111




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« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2013, 11:24:23 AM »

Ditto on the shipping. I have sent a few items by postal service with most arriving without incident but the one time I sent one of my retired digital camera's to the wife's family via priority mail and they never got it. It was no big loss but I learned a lesson. Stealing and corruption is rampant in the postal system there.

Please keep us advised on how it all goes with the radio equipment. I keep telling myself that someday I'll retire and expat there but the wife being from the Philippines said she would rather just visit rather than to return to her home country for good. Strange but true. We are due to return pretty soon for a visit. I had thought about taking a few pieces of equipment to just leave there so I could set up a small station when I'm there but I don't think i'll bother too much with it right now. Maybe another time.

Jason KJ4I

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WB0HZL
Member

Posts: 24




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« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2013, 02:15:23 AM »

If you are going to bring any radios to the Philippines, be sure to get a reciprocal license and list the equipment you are bringing. Then hand carry it with you. Only the transmitter or transceiver have to be listed.

From a Customs Officer, if it is new equipment you might have to pay fees and duty on it especially if you plan to leave it here and use when you visit. It has to be secured so that there is no unauthorized use possible when you are not available.

You might also want to consider bringing extra connectors and cable, it is not like there is a Radio Shack or a Ham Store immediately available. BTW the voltage here is 220 V.

73,
Trent WB0HZL/DW5HT  Cool
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KJ4I
Member

Posts: 111




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« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2013, 07:03:11 AM »

Thanks for the insight. I probably won't mess with it this time around since we have so much going on and not a lot of time but I did contact PARA concerning the reciprocal license. It sounds fairly simple and straight forward.  Hopefully in the next few years things will settle down somewhat and I will be in a better position to consider a minimal operating station when we go back and hopefully have a little more time to enjoy things.

73, Jason
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N8OPS
Member

Posts: 2




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« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2013, 02:29:48 AM »

Any new information on this topic?  I am also very curious to know if the Philippines has any kind of established emergency communication network that is being utilized during the post-typhoon disaster recovery and aid efforts.  It seems like this would be an ideal time for hams to help out!

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WB0HZL
Member

Posts: 24




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« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2013, 07:34:32 PM »

The best advice I can give is contact PARA and apply for a reciprocal license and list your equipment that you will bring. There is emergency communications in the Philippines on 7.095 MHz, it is not as organized as in the US amd there are not the interagency agreements like in the US. The HAMs were active and providing a valuable service - as a side note, there were only two HF stations available in the Tacloban area when the typhoon hit.

73,
Trent WB0HZL/DW5HT
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