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Author Topic: Crowd Sourcing Projects  (Read 1222 times)
W2RWJ
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« on: July 04, 2013, 09:23:02 AM »

Considering the potential public benefit of many amateur radio infrastructure projects (vs. their cost), has anyone utilized a "crowd source" of funding?

Example: http://www.gofundme.com/

73 Martin Flynn
W2RWJ
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K1CJS
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« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2013, 10:09:15 AM »

Considering that any such equipment purchased would have to be kept under ownership by a group--more commonly known as a club, and also considering that all too many clubs are dysfunctional enough already in how the club equipment is to be used, how can you ask that with any sort of a straight face?   Huh
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W2RWJ
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« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2013, 10:20:36 AM »

How can you ask that with any sort of a straight face?
Easy - ownership of the equipment is held by a 503C3 public charity that is rated Silver by Guidestar, and has been around for more then a decade.

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K1CJS
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« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2013, 01:15:58 PM »

That may well be, but who controls the use?  Usually an organization that has something to do with ham radio, and that means (most of the time) a club.  Granted, the club may be OK and the equipment available for use when needed without argument, but with the way society (and ham licensees) are these days, that would be the exception rather than the norm.

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W2RWJ
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« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2013, 06:59:01 PM »

That may well be, but who controls the use?
The project team - which is composed of a mixture of amateurs and non-licensed staff.   The plan is to schedule the asset much like conference room or other resource that has to be shared between departments.

But the question still remains:  has anyone used this model for a project with direct public benefit



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K0JEG
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« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2013, 06:15:41 AM »

Considering the potential public benefit of many amateur radio infrastructure projects (vs. their cost), has anyone utilized a "crowd source" of funding?

Example: http://www.gofundme.com/

73 Martin Flynn
W2RWJ

Unless you're talking about something like building and launching a satellite (which already has a somewhat ineffective funding source called AMSAT*), most ham radio "infrastructure" is local. There are a few multi-state linked repeater systems, but for the most part repeaters and such are just local club systems. Maybe they're self-supporting through dues or renting out the site to commercial interests, but many are just someone or a few club members maintaining the financial end for either a deduction or good will.

Most crowdfunding I've looked at either involves a product or service that is scalable and basically a startup for something larger in the long run, or is for a one time production who's cost will be recouped by the distribution of the product, like a film.

But hey, what do I know. Give it a try you never know what might come of it.

*Not AMSAT's fault: gyro-stablized payloads have basically eliminated the need for ballast in rockets and launch costs have skyrocketed (no pun intended) now that the world's governments don't subsidize commerical launches anymore.
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W9GB
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« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2013, 02:55:57 PM »

Quote from: W2RWJ
Considering the potential public benefit of many amateur radio infrastructure projects (vs. their cost), has anyone utilized a "crowd source" of funding?
IF we lived in a "perfect world", that may be possible -- BUT we do not. 
For the past 40 years I have seen these attempts ultimately fail or fade away.

WHY?  Greed, Pursuit of Control, Power.
It only takes ONE in the group, with those motives, to upset such plans.

Freeloaders are another character -- that Red Skelton made famous -- that mysterious appear and never seem to have time, money, or ability to help.
You can find them first in line at any gathering for free food (buffets), or giveaways.

When these arrangements work --- Gatekeepers are required to "cull out" the freeloaders and
restrain those that have differing motives (personal and not group).
Like weeds in the Garden, they never disappear and look for cracks in the organization.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2013, 03:00:56 PM by W9GB » Logged
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