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Author Topic: Palstar TR-30  (Read 7179 times)
SWL2002
Member

Posts: 374




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« on: July 04, 2013, 05:43:15 PM »

http://bwcelectronics.com/main/page_commercial_sales.html

http://qrper.com/2013/05/hamvention-palstar-announces-the-tr-30/

50 V Finals, 20 Watts output with IM3 of -48 dB PEP or -42 dBc.

Price $1500-$2000, available August 2013.

Comments?
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3958




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« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2013, 08:15:08 PM »

MHO..........highly overpriced!
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KH2BR
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Posts: 103




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« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2013, 09:49:45 PM »

Dang---  Its still a old superhet design. Don't these guys know that the technology is changing now. I guess its hard to teach the old guys new tricks. Nice user interface, but why not make one that utilizes DSP front end receiver with a phasing mixer and where is the cat control? Since not a phasing rig, there is no I/Q output for a band scope. A band scope could be included in the display. If all of those things were there, yes, $700 would be ok but for $1500 to $2000, I would rather poke a fork in my eye.
Since I am a Juma gear fanatic, I will stick with my TRX2A.
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AF6WL
Member

Posts: 146




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« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2013, 12:41:17 AM »

Dang---  Its still a old superhet design.

When it comes to opposite sideband rejection, that old scheme will still be 30dB ahead of any IQ system.
Bettered only once we get to direct sampling architectures.

As both methods have their pros and cons, it would be nice to have both architectures in a box - perhaps IQ as a second receiver in the box for the bells and whistles you describe.

The prototype looks kind of like someone drilled the volume control out of line; with all that space on the right it should have been over there and in line.
They say you can still get 20W of a SLA run down to 10V - there must be a DC-DC feeding the 50V PA's DC-DC - but I wonder how much current is sucked out of the dying SLA battery at that point ( hope it's a deep discharge type )
« Last Edit: July 05, 2013, 12:43:18 AM by AF6WL » Logged
SWL2002
Member

Posts: 374




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2013, 09:27:17 AM »

Dang---  Its still a old superhet design.

When it comes to opposite sideband rejection, that old scheme will still be 30dB ahead of any IQ system.
Bettered only once we get to direct sampling architectures.


Have you been hiding under a rock in the last few years?  The "IQ system" you are referring to is commonly referred to as a QSD based system.  There are issues with opposite sideband suppression, and most can easily achieve 40 dB or more.  The Elecraft KX3 uses this system and it can be better than 60 dB. 

The new Direct Sampling systems such as the ANAN, HERMES, ADAT, FLEX 6000, etc... have opposite sideband rejection of more than 100 dB.
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3958




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« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2013, 11:06:23 AM »

OOOOh!

Quote
Have you been hiding under a rock in the last few years?  The "IQ system" you are referring to is commonly referred to as a QSD based system.  There are issues with opposite sideband suppression, and most can easily achieve 40 dB or more.  The Elecraft KX3 uses this system and it can be better than 60 dB. 

The new Direct Sampling systems such as the ANAN, HERMES, ADAT, FLEX 6000, etc... have opposite sideband rejection of more than 100 dB.


Try to answer a guestion for a guy and take one up to the feathers! Sum ting wong here!

SWL 2002: With what appears to be an extensive transmitter architecture background, I don't understand why you would be soliciting comments on an obviously inferior (to you) and overpriced piece of gear.
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ZENKI
Member

Posts: 980




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« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2013, 06:23:29 PM »

Palstar should be congratulated for producing a transmitter with such impressive IMD performance.

A radio like this can grid drive a tetrode amplifier in a clean manner. 20 watts is enough  to drive a tetrode to beyond anyones legal limit without the hassle of a 30 amp
12 volt power supply. What It means is that a DX'pedition or field day operator has one less box to carry if he decides to use a grid driven tetrode amplifier.

The output power is also a excellent power level for QRP SSB use. The other radios like the KX3 and others with 10 and 5 watts output make life difficult by choosing such
a  low power output for SSB. 20 watts  on SSB is enough for working DX without struggling and screaming your lungs out. It also means you dont have to carry a ridiculous 100 watt amplifier like the KX3's  or Ten Amplifier with your QRP radio. Also when you factor in the 800 dollar costs for their expensive 100 watt amplifiers  this radio will easily prove its effectiveness at an affordable price. The accessory 100 watt amps are most expensive dollars per watt ratio amplifiers on the market. A compromise power
of 20 watts is good enough. I Still have  a SGC2020 and this radio at 20 watts of output  was excellent for HF SSB operation.

Anyone Palstar have made some smart strategic design choices with this radio. A Excellent transmitter and  good power output. I hope they also produce a version that
is a HFManpack configuration with built in Lithium iron batteries. Pedestrian mobile on SSB is more popular than QRP SSB from a park bench. A HFMANPACK configuration would also be popular with EMCOMM guys etc.

There is another market that  would make this kind of radio popular, There are many cruise ship  operator hams who want a  neat easy to carry HF station. Unfortunately the 5 watt radios like the FT817 with all accessories is just a big mess when you add all the accessories. The KX3 will be the same mess of boxes. A  small 20 watt radio that has a built in universal power supply, antenna tuner, and  things like a SWR and wattmeter that can be thrown into the suitcase will be popular with such operators.

Anyway it looks like an exciting design. I will buy one just because its transmitter is so clean. WOW. All the CB naysers promoting their CB junk said it cant be done, and its all too hard. I guess they all wrong. It also be just as easy offering a 200 or 300 watt fet amp with equally good TX IMD performance. Yup all it takes is good design engineers not CB radio copy cat engineering passed off  as state of art because these type of ham engineering companies dont want to do their jobs properly. To think that  such an affordable radio has a better designed PA than all the current 200 watt  8,000 to 10,000 dollar radios. At least if you buy this Palstar you get   a radio with decent TX IMD, that is a first for a ham radio company. The other manufacturers will now have to stop producing their junk and improve their transmitters.

Palstar A+







http://bwcelectronics.com/main/page_commercial_sales.html

http://qrper.com/2013/05/hamvention-palstar-announces-the-tr-30/

50 V Finals, 20 Watts output with IM3 of -48 dB PEP or -42 dBc.

Price $1500-$2000, available August 2013.

Comments?
Logged
AF6WL
Member

Posts: 146




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2013, 08:11:59 PM »

Palstar should be congratulated for producing a transmitter with such impressive IMD performance.

A radio like this can grid drive a tetrode amplifier in a clean manner. 20 watts is enough  to drive a tetrode to beyond anyones legal limit without the hassle of a 30 amp
12 volt power supply. What It means is that a DX'pedition or field day operator has one less box to carry if he decides to use a grid driven tetrode amplifier.

The output power is also a excellent power level for QRP SSB use. The other radios like the KX3 and others with 10 and 5 watts output make life difficult by choosing such
a  low power output for SSB. 20 watts  on SSB is enough for working DX without struggling and screaming your lungs out. It also means you dont have to carry a ridiculous 100 watt amplifier like the KX3's  or Ten Amplifier with your QRP radio. Also when you factor in the 800 dollar costs for their expensive 100 watt amplifiers  this radio will easily prove its effectiveness at an affordable price. The accessory 100 watt amps are most expensive dollars per watt ratio amplifiers on the market. A compromise power
of 20 watts is good enough. I Still have  a SGC2020 and this radio at 20 watts of output  was excellent for HF SSB operation.

Anyone Palstar have made some smart strategic design choices with this radio. A Excellent transmitter and  good power output. I hope they also produce a version that
is a HFManpack configuration with built in Lithium iron batteries. Pedestrian mobile on SSB is more popular than QRP SSB from a park bench. A HFMANPACK configuration would also be popular with EMCOMM guys etc.

There is another market that  would make this kind of radio popular, There are many cruise ship  operator hams who want a  neat easy to carry HF station. Unfortunately the 5 watt radios like the FT817 with all accessories is just a big mess when you add all the accessories. The KX3 will be the same mess of boxes. A  small 20 watt radio that has a built in universal power supply, antenna tuner, and  things like a SWR and wattmeter that can be thrown into the suitcase will be popular with such operators.

Anyway it looks like an exciting design. I will buy one just because its transmitter is so clean. WOW. All the CB naysers promoting their CB junk said it cant be done, and its all too hard. I guess they all wrong. It also be just as easy offering a 200 or 300 watt fet amp with equally good TX IMD performance. Yup all it takes is good design engineers not CB radio copy cat engineering passed off  as state of art because these type of ham engineering companies dont want to do their jobs properly. To think that  such an affordable radio has a better designed PA than all the current 200 watt  8,000 to 10,000 dollar radios. At least if you buy this Palstar you get   a radio with decent TX IMD, that is a first for a ham radio company. The other manufacturers will now have to stop producing their junk and improve their transmitters.

Palstar A+


Is running the PA of 50V sufficient to get good IMD or are they also using linearization techniques such as predistortion ? ( as described in this paper http://www.hfindustry.com/meetings_presentations/presentation_materials/2005_feb_hfia/presentations/07_hfia_data_over_radio_1_05.pdf

Would also love a lightweight 20W modern manpack - less than military grade but something that can withstand a bit more outdoor weather and rough and tumble than the KX3.
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AF6WL
Member

Posts: 146




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2013, 08:31:58 PM »


Have you been hiding under a rock in the last few years?  The "IQ system" you are referring to is commonly referred to as a QSD based system.  There are issues with opposite sideband suppression, and most can easily achieve 40 dB or more.  The Elecraft KX3 uses this system and it can be better than 60 dB.  

The new Direct Sampling systems such as the ANAN, HERMES, ADAT, FLEX 6000, etc... have opposite sideband rejection of more than 100 dB.

Dare I stick my head up again :
The point I was alluding to was that rejection in all non-digital quadrature demodulation systems depends upon extremely precise phase and amplitude calibration; there is a practical limit to how well this can be done. The KX3 as you mention is about as good as can be expected. 11 poles of xtal filtering should be better,e.g. under contest conditions, but is less flexible.
Any portable or stand alone, non professional/military, direct sampling sets yet ?
« Last Edit: July 05, 2013, 08:45:54 PM by AF6WL » Logged
KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 472




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: July 05, 2013, 10:03:23 PM »

The output power is also a excellent power level for QRP SSB use. The other radios like the KX3 and others with 10 and 5 watts output make life difficult by choosing such
a  low power output for SSB. 20 watts  on SSB is enough for working DX without struggling and screaming your lungs out.

Do you really believe that operators try to compensate for lower powered transmitters by screaming?

Anyway, this Palstar unit will be useless at 20w, because everybody knows you need at least 40w on HF SSB to make any contacts.  This entails carrying a large mess of extra boxes including an amplifier with the Palstar unit.

You make some of the most bizarre claims I have ever heard regarding radio power.  The difference between 10w and 20w is minuscule.  Both are considered inadequate by most operators, who choose to run 100w.  In any event, 20w is not QRP.

I'm also curious to see what kind of power this radio draws with that big fancy color screen.  I always thought the point of QRP was to get into the field and if your radio draws an amp on receive this is a bit of a drawback.
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AD6KA
Member

Posts: 2238




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2013, 11:49:45 AM »

KE7TMA:
Quote
Do you really believe that operators try to compensate
for lower powered transmitters by screaming?

Don't listen to many SSB contests, do you?
Lots of ops already compensate by screaming,
over driving microphones, over driving voice processors and
those goofy voice "EQ's and whatever they can get their hands
and (microphones & voices) into........ all the while
when running Legal Limit power into stacked monobanders.


KE7TMA:
Quote
Anyway, this Palstar unit will be useless at 20w, because
everybody knows you need at least 40w on HF SSB to make
any contacts.


Uh, OK, I guess they left me out when they said "everybody"
in relation to ham radio.
Tell you what, get off those
stupid repeaters, (All it is, is CB with better audio,IMHO).
Start studying to upgrade to General or Extra, and learn
about HF & propagation before you start spouting off about
brand new rigs, and what can and what cannot be accomplished
on HF with "20 watts or 40 watts".
Jeesh!
Ken  AD6KA
« Last Edit: July 07, 2013, 11:57:47 AM by AD6KA » Logged
KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 472




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2013, 07:15:55 PM »

KE7TMA:
Quote
Do you really believe that operators try to compensate
for lower powered transmitters by screaming?

Don't listen to many SSB contests, do you?
Lots of ops already compensate by screaming,
over driving microphones, over driving voice processors and
those goofy voice "EQ's and whatever they can get their hands
and (microphones & voices) into........ all the while
when running Legal Limit power into stacked monobanders.


KE7TMA:
Quote
Anyway, this Palstar unit will be useless at 20w, because
everybody knows you need at least 40w on HF SSB to make
any contacts.


Uh, OK, I guess they left me out when they said "everybody"
in relation to ham radio.
Tell you what, get off those
stupid repeaters, (All it is, is CB with better audio,IMHO).
Start studying to upgrade to General or Extra, and learn
about HF & propagation before you start spouting off about
brand new rigs, and what can and what cannot be accomplished
on HF with "20 watts or 40 watts".
Jeesh!
Ken  AD6KA

Ken, I am not a contester.  I don't really listen to them intentionally.  I have noticed that SSB TX audio is all over the place regardless of contests.  Many people appear to compress the audio all to hell, and use every trick they can think of, usually resulting in (to my ears) no greater range and signal unintelligibility at marginal levels.  It would be nice to see the results of a statistical analysis of SSB operating methodology and range.  Other people try to coax a more ear-friendly sound out of their SSB rigs (ESSB is one of these methods) and I appreciate their efforts, but I do believe this decreases their range.  I guess it's a personal preference.

And in regards to my 40 watt claim, I am merely parodying Zenki, who makes extremely bizarre claims about the total uselessness of 10w TX while also claiming that 20w TX is all you need.  I think it's a bit odd, and was just ribbing him.  I guess sarcasm is truly undetectable on the internet, or perhaps your irony detector needs a realignment!

I have been studying HF and propagation for years now, and have plowed through the Low Band DXing book which I would consider to be the essential study on the subject from an amateur perspective.  Since I have CW privileges on 80m and 40m now, I am somewhat less motivated to upgrade my license but I will probably do it soon anyway.  At any rate, it's pretty presumptuous of you to lecture me and tell me to "get off those stupid repeaters" considering that I never use them anyway.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2013, 07:17:57 PM by KE7TMA » Logged
KA4NMA
Member

Posts: 354




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: July 07, 2013, 07:39:20 PM »

Does anybody know the specs on this radio?  Power Supply requirements,  What bands does it cover?  Any other info?

Randy ka4nma
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ZENKI
Member

Posts: 980




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: July 08, 2013, 02:34:48 AM »

Well your experience and mine is different.  I use a AEG manpack at 20 watts and I can work DX just as effectively with  it as I can with a 100 watts. Even with simple  low angle radiators like verticals and slopping dipoles I have very rewarding QSO's without  being beat upside the head  like your are when using 5 or 10 watts. Try carrying a  3 element beam around portable, it would be enough to put you off QRP for life. Effectively thats what you getting by using 20 or 25 watts. The boost is enormous. There is no quick to erect antenna that will give you that kind of boost. Even if you could say erect  a small 2 element mini beam you cant get it high enough to give you much advantage for DX work. A low beam is great for field day operations but the angle of radiation is too high for serious DX work. My sloping dipole fed against a telescopic pole beats a beam on long very long paths for me like Asia and the pacific.  So the 20 watt power level  is very effective.

 On many occasions with the manpack connected to  my screwdriver on my car I would switch between it and a TS480HX on 100 watts during a QSO without telling the other operator. 99% of the time nobody even mentions that my signal has dropped. This is really what has convinced me about the 20 to 25 watt power level. The other problem is that it can also be a matter of the AGC system in the receiver and how the S-meter is calibrated. Most S meters cant even  register 6 db accurately depending on where the 6db ifalls on the scale. Its another reason why I  argue so strongly for calibrated S meters on radios. If hams could actually measure  6 db accurately they would soon see how good or bad antennas really are and how little difference power makes when watched on a real calibrated S-meter.

 I operated on holiday from several Pacific islands. It was not a DXpedition. Just casual operation with some  friends back home. I carried a FT857 with  small power supply  capable of supplying no more than 50 watts of output. I worked from the pacific on all bands from 80 through to 10 meters with verticals and dipoles. I did numerous experiments on long path 20 meters adjusting my power from 1 to 50 watts. My friends were all using very accurate SDR receivers. For them between 25 and  50 watts they could  barely tell.  From 5 to 25 watts  was very noticeable  and they suggested that this was  the best compromise power level  for readability and signal strength. I even managed a contact on 75 SSB with 25 watts  with a station using a   4 square array. I was not even using the  seawater properties. I was many wavelengths inland on many occasions.

I have no details on the Palstar radio.  But any TFT with backlight will be power hungry. I just  know this from using all the various models of smart phones.  When you throw in the 20 watts of output power  running the thing on batteries will be a challenge. It would not be a problem for a lithium iron battery pack if the batteries were packaged in a sensible manner.  Many Jungle HF radios and survival HF radios  are packaged for 50 watts of output on batteries for emergency communications. 20 watts should be no problem. I just think a radio like the Palstar would be better packaged as a light duty HF manpack with say a removable front panel that could be for instance strapped to your wrist or clipped onto the radio. The battery pack would form a substantial part of the radio. They then could make a clip on  power supply and antenna tuner.

A good HF manpack configuration   to copy would be the  AEG Telefunken SE6861/12, this is my favorite  HF manpack radio. A ham version of a radio like this would be a huge hit if some manufacturer made it. It would not
have to be as rugged and overbuilt. A strong plastic configuration like a Pelican case would be ideal. The Tadiran  manpacks are good examples, strong impact resistant plastic packaging.



The output power is also a excellent power level for QRP SSB use. The other radios like the KX3 and others with 10 and 5 watts output make life difficult by choosing such
a  low power output for SSB. 20 watts  on SSB is enough for working DX without struggling and screaming your lungs out.

Do you really believe that operators try to compensate for lower powered transmitters by screaming?

Anyway, this Palstar unit will be useless at 20w, because everybody knows you need at least 40w on HF SSB to make any contacts.  This entails carrying a large mess of extra boxes including an amplifier with the Palstar unit.

You make some of the most bizarre claims I have ever heard regarding radio power.  The difference between 10w and 20w is minuscule.  Both are considered inadequate by most operators, who choose to run 100w.  In any event, 20w is not QRP.

I'm also curious to see what kind of power this radio draws with that big fancy color screen.  I always thought the point of QRP was to get into the field and if your radio draws an amp on receive this is a bit of a drawback.
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ZENKI
Member

Posts: 980




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: July 08, 2013, 03:30:01 AM »

Yes it is sufficient. Its  a simple solution that other ham manufacturers should copy. Take a 200 watt PA and run it at 100 watts of output. This is a quick and easy way to get a good IMD outcome.
It is however better if they first selected proper RF FETS and not industrial heating devices or cheap CB radio bipolar 12 volt transistors.

I have a AEG HF manpack that is battery operated. With battery operation it can achieve  3rd order IMD figures of -36db or better. We have radios like the Yaesu, Kenwood and Icom that have 200 watt PA's that can even match it and they run from the  mains. The IMD issue is really over complicated by hams who are just apologists for their favorite manufacturers who sell junk. If they wanted to produce clean radios they could do so at a drop of hat by just good engineering practice and not even having to rely on technologies like adaptive pre-distortion, cartesian loop or feedforward amplifiers. First design the PA to be clean and clean the remaining garbage using feedforward, Thats really what we need in the ham service.

Anyway I am happy that Palstar has taken the first step in demonstrating to the average ham that a clean transmitter design can be easily accomplished if its a design objective, Something that has been missing from the designers checklist for most ham radio companies. A good example is the new Argonaut 6 from TenTec. It has a fantastic high performance receiver. If its PA was clean design it could be clean affordable design that most hams could afford. There is no need for 10,000 dollar clean IMD radios, it can be done for a 1000 dollars.  The Ten Tec Eagle is another radio as a case in point. It has great specifications but the transmitter is really a  garbage generator. If Ten Tec could offer that radio with  a 48 volt PA or some kind of low IMD PA I would buy  it. However I wont buy any radio with a lousy  garbage generating PA. It would not have take much to make either of these Ten Tec radio perfect in both receiver and transmitter performance. The same comments apply to all the other ham companies.

I agree with you. A light HF manpack configuration would be desirable. You can have a nice HF manpack box that could hold your paddle, batteries, tuner and power supply. Clip off the front panel cover and you operating in 2 minutes.
All the QRP cutesy radios with all the accessory crap is  just  a messy nightmare of wires and fragile bits hanging and dangling everywhere. I mean look at the KX3 with all those flaky 3.5mm unreliable connectors. We all know how fragile they are, and how prone they are  becoming intermittent and noisy. The worst possible connector to put on a piece of portable equipment. Even the headphone connector on my K2 does not short out the speak anymore and its a huge job to pull that connector out to fix it. Something like the easy to find and use RCA connectors spread  all over the radio makes more sense. You can get RCA cables and connectors in any place in the world. You can even use the RCA connector for a QRP coax connector.  The make RCA connector banks that solder to the PCB and they are all very cheap. You can even get the waterproof boots.

 Many manufacturers just miss the convenience of the manpack design. What gets me is that the military knows more about portable HF operation and equipment design. Yet  the wider ham manufacturing community  thinks that they have a better solution. If you compare a KX3 and a HFManpack, the KX3 would be considered a failure if you actually considered what is actually important for convenient and reliable portable operation. This unhealthy obsessiveness  with only receiver performance is really the downfall of the KX3's design when they failed to consider so many other important aspects of portable operations  like reliability and convenience. I have seen so many KX3's for sale already and thats no surprise to me. Once the novelty of the  best receiver wears off you soon have to deal with the lack of battery capacity, reliability and the total inconvenience of  the total package. Even a FT817 is a more practical convenient QRP radio. But like the KX3 the  novelty of the FT817 soon wears off for most non serious QRP operators because it lacks battery capacity and sufficient power output to have real fun with.

 The  merry bunch of pedestrian mobile operators led by G4AKC is on the right track towards developing reliable and portable battery operated high power stations that are convenient and easy to use for portable operation.  If hams could buy a setup like G4AKC's without the mess it would soon be the most popular way to operate on ham radio. But like I said the ham companies are just so out of touch, or their  chief designers seem to be only designing equipment for their own tastes and nobody else. A 25 watt HFmanpack radio with a reliable lithium iron supply that can operate at least for 48 hours or more on standby  or give you at least 8 hours of transmit time is the way to go. I  mean you think about it. You drive all the way into the boonies spending expensive gas money. You unpack the radio and you lucky if you can get 1 hours operating time before you have to change the batteries or switch over to plugging the radio into the cars battery supply. This is just not a smart way to spend your gas money. If you could drive and get there in the morning. Take a hike  for  say 1 hour and then operate for the rest of the day and then hike back before dark without your batteries going flat on the radio that would be ideal. Thats why shrinking radios without providing a  reliable power source is a huge waste of design effort.

Anyway everybody has a different take on how they operate. I just like grabbing my AEG HF Manpack with everything ready to go. I can operate pedestrian mobile with the whip. True portable with the  wires or vertical and take the whole station down in 2 minutes flat. I can run, hike, canoe, sail and bike with the HF manpack without having to collect accessories 24 hours before I leave. I dont have to worry about the batteries going flat for the whole day. How can argue with such convenience and reliability. Its QRP or Portable nirvana operating with a HFmanpack.   Yet you get people telling me I must buy a KX3, paddle, batteries, amp  all sorts of accessory crap like a ridiculous 100 watt amp  that would be like carrying a SB220 around for portable operation. What a joke.. I mean get real, get a HFMANPACK!

Palstar should be congratulated for producing a transmitter with such impressive IMD performance.

A radio like this can grid drive a tetrode amplifier in a clean manner. 20 watts is enough  to drive a tetrode to beyond anyones legal limit without the hassle of a 30 amp
12 volt power supply. What It means is that a DX'pedition or field day operator has one less box to carry if he decides to use a grid driven tetrode amplifier.

The output power is also a excellent power level for QRP SSB use. The other radios like the KX3 and others with 10 and 5 watts output make life difficult by choosing such
a  low power output for SSB. 20 watts  on SSB is enough for working DX without struggling and screaming your lungs out. It also means you dont have to carry a ridiculous 100 watt amplifier like the KX3's  or Ten Amplifier with your QRP radio. Also when you factor in the 800 dollar costs for their expensive 100 watt amplifiers  this radio will easily prove its effectiveness at an affordable price. The accessory 100 watt amps are most expensive dollars per watt ratio amplifiers on the market. A compromise power
of 20 watts is good enough. I Still have  a SGC2020 and this radio at 20 watts of output  was excellent for HF SSB operation.

Anyone Palstar have made some smart strategic design choices with this radio. A Excellent transmitter and  good power output. I hope they also produce a version that
is a HFManpack configuration with built in Lithium iron batteries. Pedestrian mobile on SSB is more popular than QRP SSB from a park bench. A HFMANPACK configuration would also be popular with EMCOMM guys etc.

There is another market that  would make this kind of radio popular, There are many cruise ship  operator hams who want a  neat easy to carry HF station. Unfortunately the 5 watt radios like the FT817 with all accessories is just a big mess when you add all the accessories. The KX3 will be the same mess of boxes. A  small 20 watt radio that has a built in universal power supply, antenna tuner, and  things like a SWR and wattmeter that can be thrown into the suitcase will be popular with such operators.

Anyway it looks like an exciting design. I will buy one just because its transmitter is so clean. WOW. All the CB naysers promoting their CB junk said it cant be done, and its all too hard. I guess they all wrong. It also be just as easy offering a 200 or 300 watt fet amp with equally good TX IMD performance. Yup all it takes is good design engineers not CB radio copy cat engineering passed off  as state of art because these type of ham engineering companies dont want to do their jobs properly. To think that  such an affordable radio has a better designed PA than all the current 200 watt  8,000 to 10,000 dollar radios. At least if you buy this Palstar you get   a radio with decent TX IMD, that is a first for a ham radio company. The other manufacturers will now have to stop producing their junk and improve their transmitters.

Palstar A+


Is running the PA of 50V sufficient to get good IMD or are they also using linearization techniques such as predistortion ? ( as described in this paper http://www.hfindustry.com/meetings_presentations/presentation_materials/2005_feb_hfia/presentations/07_hfia_data_over_radio_1_05.pdf

Would also love a lightweight 20W modern manpack - less than military grade but something that can withstand a bit more outdoor weather and rough and tumble than the KX3.

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