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Author Topic: Older 4-Band Rigs  (Read 2575 times)
KD6OJG
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Posts: 38




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« on: July 09, 2013, 02:08:19 PM »

Back in the early 90's when I got my ticket I used to peruse the catalogs of the top HF rig manufacturers.

Who were the companies that made those rigs that only operated on 6/10/20/40?  Or maybe it was 10/15/20/40.  There were several variations and I can't remember what bands they were or who were the manufacturers.  I don't believe it was Yaesu so it was either Kenwood or Icom.

And why don't they make those stand alone rigs for 2m/70cm anymore?  What if there is a ham who only wants to operate on just 2 meter but wants one of those giant rigs with all the bells and whistles.  The same goes for HF.  I've read about numerous hams that only operate on 20 meters.

Is it just economics or technology that makes it unfeasible to build a rig strictly for one band?
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N3HFS
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« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2013, 02:41:29 PM »

Hope my reminiscences don't wander too far from your query.  When I first became a ham in the late 80's, there was still plenty of non-WARC HF gear on the market, then only slightly used.  The price was often pretty good, because hams wanted access to the new 30, 17, and 12M bands.  The older equipment generally offered the 5 "basic" HF bands, 80/40/20/15/10M.  A large subset of those also provided the 160M band (MF) as well.

Few rigs at that time went up to 6M (of course, I'm focused on the low-to-medium priced rigs that I could realistically dream about back then).  One exception I can recall was a version of Kenwood's TS-140S, called the TS-680S I think, that added 6M to the HF bands.  I think the technology for high-powered output transistors at 100W and 12V just wasn't ready to affordably handle 50MHz yet back then.

Then, as now, there are plenty of stand-alone FM rigs for 2 meters.  If you want 70cm, most of your options will be dual-banders nowadays, but back in the 90s there were quite a few 220MHz and 440MHz single-bander FM rigs to be had.  Myself, I was proud to have a stack of Icom 28H, 38A, and 48A radios to cover those three bands in my suburban shack!

For all-mode VHF and UHF rigs, things have also consolidated to where most of the market is in multi-band rigs, often packaged along with HF in a bottom-to-top band xcvr.  But twenty years ago, there was a fair number of mono-band units to choose from - but at a price! There were also several modular systems where band-packs would be installed to offer you a choice of three or more of (possibly) 6M/2M/220/440/1200MHz.

But to answer your last question, I think both technology (wide-band solid state components) and economics (efficiencies in producing fewer, multi-functional products) simply makes the added cost of additional ham bands so low that it would allow a competitor to sell a multiband rig for just a bit more than your mono-bander, so the market simply doesn't bear the costs of supporting a catalog of several models that would be needed to cover all the bands. 
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AA4PB
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« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2013, 02:43:06 PM »

Today's technology is such that it doesn't cost that much more to build a transceiver for multiple bands. They would charge almost as much for a 20M only transceiver with all the bells and whistles as they would for one that covers all the HF bands.

At the QRP level you can find 20M only transceivers. That's because they are simpler, don't have all the bells and whistles, and often are supplied in kit form.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2013, 03:45:34 PM »

Back in the early 90's when I got my ticket I used to peruse the catalogs of the top HF rig manufacturers.

Who were the companies that made those rigs that only operated on 6/10/20/40?  Or maybe it was 10/15/20/40.  There were several variations and I can't remember what bands they were or who were the manufacturers.  I don't believe it was Yaesu so it was either Kenwood or Icom.



Kenwood sold the TS-660 (6-10-12-15m) and the TS-670 (6-10-15-40m) for a while.

Yaesu sold the FT-650 (6-10-12m) and the FT-655 (6-10-12m) for a while.

Both long discontinued.

I don't think Icom ever made anything like that, at least not for the U.S. market.
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NI3S
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« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2013, 06:40:08 PM »

Quote
One exception I can recall was a version of Kenwood's TS-140S, called the TS-680S I think, that added 6M to the HF bands.

Correct, except the TS-140S has the WARC bands as does it's predecessor the TS-130 series.  The TS-120 was lacking the WARC bands. 
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KD6OJG
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Posts: 38




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« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2013, 06:11:28 PM »

Back in the early 90's when I got my ticket I used to peruse the catalogs of the top HF rig manufacturers.

Who were the companies that made those rigs that only operated on 6/10/20/40?  Or maybe it was 10/15/20/40.  There were several variations and I can't remember what bands they were or who were the manufacturers.  I don't believe it was Yaesu so it was either Kenwood or Icom.



Kenwood sold the TS-660 (6-10-12-15m) and the TS-670 (6-10-15-40m) for a while.

Yaesu sold the FT-650 (6-10-12m) and the FT-655 (6-10-12m) for a while.

Both long discontinued.

I don't think Icom ever made anything like that, at least not for the U.S. market.

Since I posted my question I did some research and came across a website called rig pix.

I found those rigs and there was also the Icom 575A 6/10 meter.  Icom also had the IC-275/375/475 rigs...2 meter, 220, and70cm.

I'd love to have the Yaesu Ft-650 or the Kenwood TS-670.

Thanks everyone for the help.
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AF5CC
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Posts: 876




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« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2013, 10:26:51 PM »

NCG had a radio in the 80s that covered 40m, 15m, and 6m at 10 watts.  Saw one at Field Day once.  They turn up from time to time.  Tokyo Hy-Power had the HT-750 which was a 40/15/6m Hand Held! 

The Yaesu FT650 still commands a pretty good price on the used market.  The most remarkable thing about it was that it had an autonotch filter and didn't use DSP to do it. 

The Kenwood TS670 is pretty rare today.  I don't think they were imported into the US, or if they were, it wasn't for long.  The TS660 is much more common.

Icom also had the 1275A for 1.2ghz, they are pretty rare to find also.

John AF5CC
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #7 on: July 13, 2013, 02:31:56 PM »

NCG had a radio in the 80s that covered 40m, 15m, and 6m at 10 watts.  Saw one at Field Day once. 

NCG never manufactured anything.  That rig (I remember it) was made in Japan by FDK.  It was sold under a few different labels.
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W6EM
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Posts: 800




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« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2013, 05:49:03 PM »

NCG had a radio in the 80s that covered 40m, 15m, and 6m at 10 watts.  Saw one at Field Day once. 

NCG never manufactured anything.  That rig (I remember it) was made in Japan by FDK.  It was sold under a few different labels.
I recall one by Mizuho that was a 3 band SSB-HT.  They also made several single band models as well.  During the early '2000s, Tokyo Hypower was going to undertake manufacture of more of the tri-band versions, but don't think it happened.  Could be wrong on that.
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AF5CC
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« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2013, 10:44:52 PM »

The NCG (or whoever made it) tribander:  http://www.rigpix.com/ncg/72150.htm

HT750:  http://www.rigpix.com/tokyohypower/ht750.htm
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KD6OJG
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Posts: 38




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« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2013, 02:02:55 PM »

NCG had a radio in the 80s that covered 40m, 15m, and 6m at 10 watts.  Saw one at Field Day once. 

NCG never manufactured anything.  That rig (I remember it) was made in Japan by FDK.  It was sold under a few different labels.
I recall one by Mizuho that was a 3 band SSB-HT.  They also made several single band models as well.  During the early '2000s, Tokyo Hypower was going to undertake manufacture of more of the tri-band versions, but don't think it happened.  Could be wrong on that.

I've seen those little Mizuho SSB rigs before.  Here's a website that I've had bookmarked for awhile.  They're neat looking rigs.

http://www.mizuhoradio.com/mx.html
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W6EM
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Posts: 800




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« Reply #11 on: July 14, 2013, 04:24:22 PM »

Cool.  I forgot that they were '90s production.  I seem to recall, then, in the early 2000's corresponding with them about a remanufacture of more of the HT-750's.  Cool radios and probably VERY collectable.

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KD0ACY
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« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2013, 06:25:59 PM »

What does WARC stand for?
Mike








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KB4QAA
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« Reply #13 on: July 14, 2013, 06:40:44 PM »

World Amateur Radio Conference.
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N3HFS
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Posts: 212




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« Reply #14 on: July 14, 2013, 06:49:33 PM »

What does WARC stand for?
Mike
World Administrative Radio Conference

WARCs covered much more than Amateur Radio.

It was the former name of ITU's gathering of delegates from many different nations every so many years (it varies) to discuss and come to agreement on international issues of spectrum allocation, standardized regulations, and so forth.  More recently, these conferences are called WRCs, or World Radiocommunications Conferences.

In 1979, the WARC granted the worldwide Amateur Radio Service operating space in three "new" HF bands: 30 meters, 17 meters, and 12 meters.  The former users of these bands were given a set amount of time to move away, and the bands were opened to hams in the 1980s.

« Last Edit: July 14, 2013, 07:00:18 PM by N3HFS » Logged
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