Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3] 4 5 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Do you currently use a straight key?  (Read 52412 times)
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1716




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: July 14, 2013, 02:37:36 AM »

Re: Reply #28

Interesting? I always get a kick out of folks whose mentality makes them think that class of license held and a ham's operating ability and experience are some how related, especially when they occasionally add the number of eHam lookups of a particular individual to the mix as something meaningful.
Logged
K7RNO
Member

Posts: 279




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: July 14, 2013, 01:58:42 PM »

Quote
Does that mean your opinions and personal preferences on all things CW are law?

Any more Generals want to chime in? No kids, lids, space cadets, multiple choice CW experts --or worse-- need apply  Smiley

Ever thought of the possibility of any professional, pre-ham experience?

I didn't think so  Roll Eyes
Logged

73,
aRNO
NAQCC #6870, SKCC #11131
PA1ZP
Member

Posts: 239




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: July 15, 2013, 10:02:59 AM »

Hi to you all

I sometimes use a straight key, in a very rare moment I use the old straight key of my SK friend PZ1AP , just to remember him and to honour him.

I usualy work the homebrew paddles and or the single lever key of HA8KN  or the Vibroplex bug.
And I am a very bad operator in CW TX because of my terrible clumsy hands.

And the man with the tip for the W0AAA links , I had great fun and admiration for his skills on the paddles with left and right hands.

I also worked a few times with an Autronic key when I needed to repair it and make it working again for a friend of mine.
Very strange key looked and worked a lot like the Vibrokeyer, or might it be that the Vibro keyer works a lot like the Autronic hihi.

I think I heve 5 straight keys or so and I use them so very few times that I even have troubles to even count how many I have.
But they all heve very different and good memmories atached to them so i will not part with these keys.
Logged
K0EWS
Member

Posts: 38


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #33 on: July 15, 2013, 05:13:21 PM »

I use a straight key sometimes. I got an "old" one a few years back from my Dad, who had bought it from an old ham. It looked old but worked (and still does) very well. Turns out after doing a little research, it was a 1st generation Mac Straight Key from the Ted McElroy Key company, manufactured in 1937. Still works great!
Logged
KD8IIC
Member

Posts: 159




Ignore
« Reply #34 on: July 15, 2013, 09:07:59 PM »

 I enjoy doing Morse using my old Signal Corps J38. I found it had a better "feel" to it compared to other straight keys. Presently am having fun with an old Lionel J37 which I have setup to use as a side-swiper. I'm not ready to bug yet.
  I have been doing CW exclusively since November. I have a keyer in the rig but I like the idea of developing a proficient fist. At this point I am not a contester or speedster and will likely never be either but I am learning to copy high speeds.
   73 from Lane in Columbus, Ohio de  n8aft  sk  ..
Logged
KA0HVE
Member

Posts: 117




Ignore
« Reply #35 on: July 17, 2013, 11:24:59 AM »

So here's what I'm doing.  I bought a Nye Viking Key Base Plate from MorseExpress that's on its way.  It's supposed to raise the key about 1/4" which is 1/2" lower than what I have now with it attached to a 3/4" thick piece of pine board.  That will put the top of the Navy Knob at about 2".  That should be much better.

The more I use the Speed-X the more I like it!

In the mean time, I'll keep looking at nicer keys although that Heavy Duty Speed-X (114-320-001) is pretty dang nice.  Right now I'm still drooling over the VIZ Camel Back.

I'm surprised by the current price of my key - $75.  On 2/1/1980 I paid $10.95 for it.  I got it to get by until I could pick out a nice key and I'm still looking for that 'nice' key.   Grin
Logged
W4FO
Member

Posts: 7




Ignore
« Reply #36 on: July 17, 2013, 01:16:53 PM »

Why and which one do you use?

I got out my Speed-X last night and it took a few minutes to get used to it again but I like it.  I'm thinking of getting a 'nice' straight key and I'm looking for recommendations.

Thanks.

I think you have the perfect key. When I use a SK the Nye Speed x is the key for me.
95% cw.
Pat w4fo
Logged
NO2A
Member

Posts: 786




Ignore
« Reply #37 on: July 17, 2013, 03:36:50 PM »

I use the Nye Viking Master Key. It`s very quiet and comfy. I must say though,that looking at the specs for the GHD `501MIL,all I can say is "wow." Very tempting indeed. No side to side movement and rock steady. I think there`s one in my future...:-).
Logged
N9AOP
Member

Posts: 146




Ignore
« Reply #38 on: July 17, 2013, 04:17:59 PM »

When using a straight key (which is not often) I use a speed-X.  I am shocked at the current price since I bought mine at a 'fest for $4.  At the time I believe that AES was selling them for 9 or 10 dollars.
Logged
AF3Y
Member

Posts: 3765




Ignore
« Reply #39 on: July 19, 2013, 10:39:01 AM »

I'll put my vote in for the Junkers key.

Bill in Pasadena, NK6Q

And I will second that.... Grin
73, Gene AF3Y
Logged
AF3Y
Member

Posts: 3765




Ignore
« Reply #40 on: July 19, 2013, 10:40:57 AM »

I've only used straight keys, and I still (again) use one now: the only one I know, a Junker in navy gray.

When you start with the best, you will be forever spoiled  Tongue

73,
Arno K7RNO/AG

The Junkers key is a good as it gets.
73, Gene AF3Y
Logged
STAYVERTICAL
Member

Posts: 873




Ignore
« Reply #41 on: July 19, 2013, 10:14:37 PM »

I use a straight key about 90 percent of the time.
The reason?
Very simple - convenience, and laziness.

Since I use a few old rigs without an inbuilt keyer, a paddle is not possible and I don't feel the need to buy a keyer just for
these rigs.
So the quickest option is just to grab the straight key and pump out some morse.

I also use a homebrew paddle with my more modern rigs and their built in keyers, and that is less tiring and more speedsome.
Also enjoyable - a different type of muscle activity.

And occasionally (shock horror!!!), I will even use CWTYPE and an RS232 optocoupler interface with my notebook.

I really don't care which system I use to send CW, but I have made some interesting observations.

1. Most contest operators seem fixated on speed, but will answer slower replies.
    It does not matter anyway since your contact will be lucky to last 5 seconds.
    Many contest operators have trouble reading morse at the speed they are sending, so obviously they are using PC's.
    I have fun with them by sending back to them at 40 wpm (their sending speed) and seeing them flounder until I slow down.

2. The vast majority of hams seem to send around 18 to 20WPM, and that is easily done by hand key.
    Many newbies send at around 12 wpm and a hand key is good to regulate my speed to their receiving ability.
    Quite a few newbies say good hand key sending "sounds better" than PC generated CW.
    I would attribute this to variable spacing between words etc, giving it a slightly different feel to machine morse.

3. Bugs in the hands of experts sound fantastic - in the wrong hands they are terrible to copy.

4. Your own personal credo and attitude to sending will determine how good your morse sounds.
    A good hand key will make it easier and perhaps more enjoyable, but the tool is only as good as the craftsman using it.
    My hand key is an old J38 bought for a few bucks at a hamfest, and it is still going strong.

So, if you do a lot of ragchewing, a paddle or bug will make it a bit less tiring, but if you only mainly have short contacts,
a hand key is quick and easy to use and will give you a chance to really hone your skills in producing excellent cw.
Speed of sending with a paddle or bug is not an indicator of skill, although by hand key it certainly is.
Speed of receiving is the real measure of CW skill, and in the end, hand key sending is the purest form of the CW art.

In practice, it does not matter which key or keying method you use as long as it makes you happy, and gives enjoyment
to your practice of the hobby.

73 - Rob

Logged
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1716




Ignore
« Reply #42 on: July 20, 2013, 06:10:54 AM »

Re: STAYVERTICAL reply # 41

You nailed it on all counts. I just relate a straight key as to driving a standard transmission auto and all other keying methods to an automatic transmission. Straight key folks like to take part in the process while the others are content to sit behind the wheel and enjoy the ride. Of course there are both good and bad drivers using each.
Logged
VE5EIS
Member

Posts: 52


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #43 on: July 21, 2013, 04:28:42 PM »

Re: STAYVERTICAL reply # 41

You nailed it on all counts. I just relate a straight key as to driving a standard transmission auto and all other keying methods to an automatic transmission. Straight key folks like to take part in the process while the others are content to sit behind the wheel and enjoy the ride. Of course there are both good and bad drivers using each.

I prefer to drive a stick - I wonder if that means I will prefer a straight key.  I am probably a year or so away from knowing the answer.
Logged
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2805




Ignore
« Reply #44 on: July 21, 2013, 05:58:16 PM »

I prefer to drive a stick - I wonder if that means I will prefer a straight key.  I am probably a year or so away from knowing the answer.

Just an observation, but while you're learning code, you should devote about the same amount of time to sending as to copying.  The straight key is perfect for training your arm and wrist muscles how to make the periods of key closure AND of key openure (feel free to use the word  Grin ).
Logged

73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3] 4 5 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!