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Author Topic: Who in their right mind...?  (Read 10020 times)
N8NSN
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« on: July 15, 2013, 06:33:50 PM »

All I can say is, "Ridiculous". Sure it's basically a rarity, one of the first solid state "boat anchors, and of the last offerings of the manufacturer, but $620.00 plus after shipping. Some folks have more dollars than sense. Wonder if this is going to end up in Joe's warehouse of never again to be used relics...

http://item.mobileweb.ebay.com/viewitem?itemId=290942930838&index=8&nav=WATCHING&nid=89038259844
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KS2G
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« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2013, 06:56:22 PM »

It's really tiresome to see the posts here and on that "other" ham radio site about "crazy" or "ridiculous" prices or old (or even not too old) gear.

Once and for all -- ANY ITEM IS "WORTH" WHATEVER A BUYER IS WILLING TO PAY!

Get over it.  Smiley

73,
Mel - KS2G

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N8NSN
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« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2013, 03:46:03 AM »

It's really tiresome to see the posts here and on that "other" ham radio site about "crazy" or "ridiculous" prices or old (or even not too old) gear.

Once and for all -- ANY ITEM IS "WORTH" WHATEVER A BUYER IS WILLING TO PAY!

Get over it.  Smiley

73,
Mel - KS2G


Even more tiresome is your complaint. Bands have been down to minimals, so a many of us are just bored and surfing the swaps. MANY new hams would have no idea exactly what is or ins's reasonable to pay for any kind of vintage gear...

So as you don't want to play nice, wanting to come in here and give a poke at someone, and with this one - appear apathetic to what's been happening in the vintage market... Just shhhhhhh. Keeping things to yourself once in a while may just be a better idea.

I'll have a look through your previous posts to see if what I'm thinking will be there, is indeed there. Pretty sure it will be exactly as expected.

Hope you keep coming back and feeding this site. Why? Because I agree with you 100% on your statement and it's good entertainment to read some of eham's offerings on slow days.

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KD8IIC
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Posts: 171




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« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2013, 09:05:10 PM »

 Hi Jim ; I was watching that too. I was surprised it fetched such a high price as well.
 73 from Lane.
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W7GIF
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Posts: 126




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« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2013, 11:19:33 AM »

Oh, gosh. Where to begin?
There are any number of buyer's motives out there. Some just out to turn an item for a quick buck, and then some that crave to re-kindle or evoke memories of a time in their life that was less anxiety-ridden than today's pressure-cooker environment. Who can put a price on memories? Only those who have a desire or need to recall those memories. My budget simply can't support my appetite for memory recall. But, more power to those whose budget can support that appetite.

In simple terms of the dollar's value, one could argue that a radio that sold for $530 in 1968 (when gasoline was 34 cents/gallon, and a 1lb box of saltines was 19 cents), could have an "adjusted" 2013 price of $5,300 when gasoline is $3.70/gallon, and those saltines are $1.90. Using just a clinical inflationary "today's dollar" analysis, $620 for the HQ-215 would be a bargain at nearly 1/10 it's adjusted inflationary value.....even in "used" condition. Actually, as the condition of 1960's era radios goes, this HQ-215 was very nice. And....it's supportable, in that most of the circuit devices are still available, and can be replaced by almost anyone with a $10 soldering iron, and a multimeter....on their kitchen table.....and not faced with custom, static sensitive, soon-obsoleted devices whose replacement requires SMT rework fixturization, and network and logic analyzers just to find a faulty device (or.....return to manufacturer for $$$ repair).

Will a 1968 HQ-215 provide all the "features" or match the performance of current offerings? No. Can it evoke priceless memories of the past, or satisfy long-since "wants" or "dreams" at (now) more affordable cost? Absolutely.

I only wish that my "discretionary spending" budget could support my appetite. I'm the guy with a champagne appetite, and a beer budget  Cry




« Last Edit: July 17, 2013, 11:22:31 AM by W7GIF » Logged
KE7TMA
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Posts: 472




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« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2013, 02:01:10 PM »

All I can say is, "Ridiculous". Sure it's basically a rarity, one of the first solid state "boat anchors, and of the last offerings of the manufacturer, but $620.00 plus after shipping. Some folks have more dollars than sense. Wonder if this is going to end up in Joe's warehouse of never again to be used relics...

http://item.mobileweb.ebay.com/viewitem?itemId=290942930838&index=8&nav=WATCHING&nid=89038259844

I think the same thing when I see people driving around those ridiculous ugly 60s and 70s muscle cars.  Then I remember that it's their money, so ultimately I can't be arsed to care.
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AA4HA
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Posts: 1646




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« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2013, 05:51:01 PM »

Selling a radio, here are the choices;

1) Find someone local (your town) who practically wants you to give it away and then brings the thing back in six months and wants their money back after they left it attached to an antenna during a thunderstorm and the magic smoke packets were let out.

2) Go to a hamfest where you put a $200 price tag on it and try selling it to someone gets really angry when you will not spend an entire afternoon being haggled down to $75.

3) Put it up on eBay where there are potentially thousands of people looking at it and you do not need to deal with them until they have committed to pay a certain price.

Buying a radio has a different set of choices. I look at something and think "hmm, how badly do I want this?" and I pin a price to it as a bid. More times than not I lose a bid to someone who is willing to pay more, in some cases several times more, than I.

Good for them, good for the seller. I hope they get what they are looking for and I am glad the seller made some money off of the transaction.

Yes, there are times that I have been annoyed that it might of been something that I really wanted too but I am not going to get all mad because someone paid more than I was willing to.

Ebay is impersonal, some of us like it that way. If you like personal, stick to buying and selling to people you know in your area or can haggle with at a hamfest.

Different strokes and all that stuff.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
KD8IIC
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Posts: 171




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« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2013, 03:36:14 AM »

 I like to shop E-bay for "junque", stuff I wanted back when I had a family to raise. Now they're gone and I have money to enjoy. I just recapped a nice Ranger and have a 2NT to do next. The old tube rigs emit a flavorful aroma that my Icomic 718 just can't come up with.
 Old cars, boats, planes and locomotives, be it diesel or steam, have their own fragrance and personalities as well. Four Things to Do... Seize The Day, Damn The Torpedoes, Spend The Money, Have Fun!
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VE3FMC
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« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2013, 03:27:55 PM »

All I can say is, "Ridiculous". Sure it's basically a rarity, one of the first solid state "boat anchors, and of the last offerings of the manufacturer, but $620.00 plus after shipping. Some folks have more dollars than sense. Wonder if this is going to end up in Joe's warehouse of never again to be used relics...

http://item.mobileweb.ebay.com/viewitem?itemId=290942930838&index=8&nav=WATCHING&nid=89038259844

I think the same thing when I see people driving around those ridiculous ugly 60s and 70s muscle cars.  Then I remember that it's their money, so ultimately I can't be arsed to care.

Remember this. Some guys grew up driving those cars from the 60's & 70's. They just want to go back in time when cars were simple and easy to fix. Fun to drive too.

I have a 1999 Cobra SVT and I would trade that car in a heartbeat for a nice 1965 Mustang.

But I would not pay $650 for an old receiver!
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4969




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« Reply #9 on: July 22, 2013, 01:37:57 AM »

Look how much gets paid for paintings by Picasso, Monet, Manet, Constable etc. That's just for something to hang on the wall.
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K0OD
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Posts: 2591




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« Reply #10 on: July 22, 2013, 06:55:04 AM »

Imagine how thrilled your grandchildren will be when they inherit your valuable estate and learn it consists solely of hundreds of boatanchor radios and unbuilt Heathkits.

Quote
those ridiculous ugly 60s and 70s muscle cars.
  Yep, I know a guy, he's flat broke with 6 kids, but he tells his friends that his nice 60s Dodge is worth  $1 million+.

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N2EY
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« Reply #11 on: July 22, 2013, 10:53:31 AM »

Why is it ridiculous?

The HQ-215 is a bit of a rarity. It can transceive with the Collins 32S-x transmitters, and was intended to be a sort of solid-state competition for the 75S-3. But of course it didn't beat Collins at that game, and there was never a matching Hammarlund transmitter for the HQ-215.

It did, however, inspire me to use a drum dial in some homebrew stuff I've built.

----

The 1960s-70s were a bit of an odd time for ham radio. On the one hand, there were hams complaining about ham radio being "behind the times" because there was so much tube gear still being made and used. Yet when a rigmaker came out with solid-state stuff, it almost never succeeded in the market. The Johnson Avenger - the HQ-215 - the SB-303 - the HRO-500 and many others found themselves outdone by hollow-state stuff.
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G3RZP
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« Reply #12 on: July 23, 2013, 08:41:18 AM »

Most of the professional SS receivers of the 60s and first two years of the 70's were pretty so-so in performance compared with the last generation of hollow state.
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W2WDX
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Posts: 188




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« Reply #13 on: August 12, 2013, 02:20:31 PM »

OK, not everyone buys things to use them. So the performance of this receiver is non sequitur. In other words irrelevant.

Some people simply collect. Eric Claptons "brownie" Fender guitar was bought for just under a million dollars by a guy who doesn't play guitar at all. He just collects. This guy owns about 270 guitars and can't play a note. A HQ215 is very hard to come by in excellent condition as this one was. A collector not only pays high to get what he wants, but also to establish the value or potential resale price for the item he is purchasing.

Also to some people the value of a dollar is different. If you worked a middle class job your whole life and are living off a modest pension, $620 for an old receiver is outrageous. If you are wealthy, $620 may be what you paid for lunch for you and your girl the day before, in other words $600 is pocket change. To some $2000 is pocket change. So buying something they want for $600 is nothing at all. Money and value is always relative.

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KE3WD
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« Reply #14 on: August 12, 2013, 04:32:50 PM »

W2WDX puts you some knowledge and wisdom. 

73
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