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Author Topic: TS-440s IF Board pics needed  (Read 2147 times)
W7EJT
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Posts: 142




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« on: July 16, 2013, 01:56:20 PM »

Can someone send me a few close-up pics of the IF board. I am replacing the IF board and didn't do that great a job identifying the connectors (my bad). There must be 20+ connectors. I have the Service Manual, but it does not talk to the wire color at each connector.

Also, silly question - but I can't find the two pin connector for the speaker (it was unhooked when I got it)

thanks, and 73

cass44@outlook.com
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W7EJT
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Posts: 142




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« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2013, 04:50:39 PM »

Found the Speaker Connection (under some wiring)!

Perhaps this would simplify: What color wires are connect to J22 and J14? (both are 2 pin connectors, right next to each other)

J22 and J14 are labeled 22 and 14 on the IF board...
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2013, 06:22:46 PM »

Follow those two on the Service Manual to see where they go.  Look for component labels near them.  Then follow the actual cables backwards in the radio, look for the same clues in the real. 

That's how I have to sort such things out all the time when things are sent in disassembled or another tech has done the disassembly and I'm tasked with the finish. 


73
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W7EJT
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Posts: 142




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« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2013, 10:24:53 AM »

OK, I'll try that. But those (4) wires go into a labyrinth of other wires - so diss-assembly here we go again...

73
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KE3WD
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« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2013, 12:05:54 PM »

I usually find that disassembling bundled cables is not as fast or noninvasive than simply locating the wire and lightly tugging on it, then moving down the bundle to where you located and doing that again.  Repeat until you've found the other end. 
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KE4JOY
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Posts: 1384




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« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2013, 01:40:28 PM »

Then there is good old fashioned continuity testing.
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W7EJT
Member

Posts: 142




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« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2013, 04:50:26 PM »

OK, followed the schematic. I found the correct connections!!! I will photograph the IF board for others, in case it is needed.

Works like a CHAMP, now!

Thanks for the tips!!!

73

Alan
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2013, 04:53:06 PM »

Attaboy, Alan. 

Sometimes you just have to roll up the sleeves and Git-R-Done. 

Good job.


73
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TANAKASAN
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Posts: 933




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« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2013, 01:31:36 AM »

Now is a good time to remind everybody that when doing a job like this you need to label every connector and its matching plug. Last week I took the front panel off a piece of test equipment and found twenty ribbon cables, all the same color and all unlabelled. Thirty seconds with a magic marker can save hours of hassle. Better ideas at the manufacturing stage would be:

a) A wiring harness where each plug can only reach one socket.

b) Different missing pins on each plug and matching blanked off holes on each socket.

c) Different sized plug/socket sets for each function.

Tanakasan
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2013, 06:51:40 AM »

These days, I'll just grab the cellphone camera and shoot some closeups. 

If you think the modern ham rigs are bad, don't even attempt to open the modern Video Receiver with "clamshell" construction that goes on for layer upon layer, board upon board.  I have to do that on a regular basis.  As with any other daunting task, familiarity soon breeds contempt, as it were. 

The permanent laundry marker pen is a staple on my testbenches, still, to this day.  A single dot on the plug and socket, double dot on next plug and socket, single line, double line, etc. is all it takes.  Beware of EIAJ designed AC transformer connect boards, where they often use the exact same bipin connectors repeatedly.  Mix up the primary and secondary connects and that'$ a wrap. 

And, even with all that, always bring it up on the bulb first...


73
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KA5IPF
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Posts: 1040


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« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2013, 01:02:31 PM »

On most newer Kenwoods (1980 up) if the ties on the wiring harness are not cut nor is the harness stretched out when unplugging then when the board is replaced the plugs will almost drop into where they go and usually won't reach anywhere else. Seldom will you find 2 plugs in the same area with the same pin count further helping.

My observations...

Clif
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W7EJT
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Posts: 142




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« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2013, 01:26:29 PM »

Clif - you are 99% correct and I understand. However, there are two 2-pin connectors (that I mentioned) that can easily be connected wrongly. No stretching involved.

Got the 440 working nicely (schematic research), and took some close-up pictures of the IF board (30+ connectors) and posted the at the TS-440s Yahoo group.
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