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Author Topic: newby question about antenna  (Read 1381 times)
KK4RSV
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Posts: 20




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« on: July 22, 2013, 06:41:59 PM »

I just recently received my license and have purchased a used yeasu ft 757 and I am trying to figure out what antenna to start with. I have found this on ebay "ZS6BKW / G5RV Multi-band Antenna - Rated at 2KW ". Would this be a good general antenna to start with. Do you mount it horizontally or vertically? any advice and help will be appreciated.
Thanks
Darrell "73's"

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K7MH
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Posts: 339




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« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2013, 07:00:25 PM »

Usually it would be mounted as a horizontal antenna or as an inverted V. You will need a tuner for it. I prefer a 102ft. doublet fed with 450 ohm window line. You would still need a tuner.
A G5RV is primarily designed for 20 meters. I found the 102ft. G5RV I had was pretty poor on 30 and 80. I used it on 40 and 80 mostly.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2013, 08:26:15 PM »

To me, getting my ticket and having a rig ready to go, I'd want to get on the air as fast as possible. 

Do you have an supports to mount a dipole antenna?  The dipole is probably the fastest antenna to build and install there is.  No need for a tuner..... just hang it up, trim the length until the SWR is good and you're in business.

It's also a good performer. 
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WA3SKN
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Posts: 5480




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« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2013, 04:35:10 AM »

What do you have room for? Do you have a budget?
Let's see...
500 ft spool of 14 gauge wire from hardware store... less than $50.  Chunk of coax to get outside... $50-100 (distance?). 3 Insulators for each band (one on each end and one in the middle... $1 each...tops).  This is enough to make separate dipoles for 10-80 meters, with about 50 ft to spare. Now you can scrounge coax, you can scrounge wire, and you can make insulators.
What more do you need?

-Mike.
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N4JTE
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Posts: 1155




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« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2013, 07:59:28 AM »

Take a look at this article I wrote for your exact situation, all home brew and cheap! http://www.eham.net/articles/29061
Good luck and feel free to email me at my qrz.page address with any further questions.
Bob
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W5DXP
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Posts: 3581


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« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2013, 08:54:57 AM »

... "ZS6BKW / G5RV Multi-band Antenna - Rated at 2KW ".

These antennas are similar but not identical and both require an antenna tuner. Neither antenna is an all-HF-band antenna.

The ZS6BKW is a 92 ft. dipole fed with 40 ft. of ladder-line and works well on 40m, 20m, 17m, 12m, and parts of 10m. I vary the ladder-line length from 39 ft. on 40m to 42 ft. on 10m to avoid using an antenna tuner. I also use a 500pf series doorknob capacitor for operation on 80m. Here are the measured SWRs for my ZS6BKW antenna.

http://www.w5dxp.com/ZS6BKsWr.JPG

The G5RV is a 102 ft dipole fed with 31 ft of 300 ohm twinlead and works well on 80m, 40m, 20m, and 12m. Here are the optimum lengths of 300 ohm twinlead for the different HF bands.

http://www.w5dxp.com/G5RV.HTM
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73, Cecil, www.w5dxp.com
The purpose of an antenna tuner is to increase the current through the radiation resistance at the antenna to the maximum available magnitude resulting in a radiated power of I2(RRAD) from the antenna.
AC4RD
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Posts: 1235




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« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2013, 08:59:58 AM »

Darrell, one more vote for "rolling your own!"   Wire antennas are cheap and easy to build, and fun to experiment with.  And you'll have WAY more fun working stations on an antenna you built than one you bought. Wink  The suggestions for a couple of single-band dipoles, or a "fan dipole" (plans are all over the web), are a great way to get started, if you don't mind a few minutes of work:  Measuring the wire, fixing the endpoints, connections at the feedpoint, and you're done!

Feel free to email or post here if you have questions.  Good luck, have fun, and 73!   --ken
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N8BOA
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Posts: 90




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« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2013, 09:08:04 AM »

Dipole hard to beat
468/frequency its that easy. Most antennas are derived from them. Yes even the vertical so it is logical to start here
The big question, what band 40m was my favorite it can do it all.
have fun see you on the log
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