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Author Topic: Operating Protocol  (Read 992 times)
KG6VFO
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Posts: 7




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« on: August 01, 2013, 09:25:29 AM »

I'll be in the Sierra Nevada mtns during the VHF contest in Sept. My plan is to set up a low power station on one of the peaks I'm familiar with.  What's the proper procedure if I get to the peak and another station is already set up and operating the contest?

Do I just set up a short distance away (how far?) and start operating or just find another peak or??

Thanks in advance for your comments.
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N0IU
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Posts: 1266


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« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2013, 10:44:11 AM »

Ummmm.... how can I say this politely?

"You snooze, you lose!"

I would say that it would be time to find another peak.

Or if you have a primo spot picked already out, you might want to claim the spot by camping out (at least) a day before the contest.

Sorry.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2013, 10:47:18 AM by N0IU » Logged
N2MG
Administrator

Posts: 127



« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2013, 10:56:58 AM »

(how far?)

That depends on how much power you both run, whether you guys are on the same bands, have gain antennas pointed at one another, etc. If he's already there, just ask him what would be appropriate!

I would say that if you are both transmitting under 100W and are 1000 feet apart, that could be more-or-less OK. Not sure one can get 1000 feet away and still be on the same peak. LOL
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20559




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« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2013, 11:39:31 AM »

I live in CA and am pretty familiar with the Sierra, which of course is enormous with lots and lots of peaks.

But you can't drive to the tops of any of them, at least not above about 10,000 feet -- which leaves out the "real" peaks of the high ones.

If you'll be hiking in, your chances of coming across another guy who did the same are very slim; and even if so, anyone hiking the trails won't be carrying generators and kilowatts -- they'll be running low power from a battery, solar panels, or whatever.  As such you wouldn't need much "separation" at all to stay out of each other's way.

If you're going to a summit that has road access...that would be one of the "lower" summits and of course if people can drive there, you can run into anything!

The "most local" part of the Sierra is around Tehachapi and that summit is sort-of road accessible (better if you have a 4WD), although the upper portions aren't paved or anything.  It crests around 7K feet and has a good view in all directions except west.  Maybe you're thinking around there?  Or were you heading up north?
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