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Author Topic: Authoring Articles for CQ Magazine?  (Read 71191 times)
WI8P
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Posts: 270




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« Reply #75 on: August 31, 2013, 09:16:28 AM »

"Something" at CQ and their sister publication, Popular Communications seems to be going on.  Am I the ONLY subscriber on here who is not receiving their issues in a timely manner, or not at all in recent months ?  I used to get BOTH magazines mid-month BEFORE the publication date.  Then, BOTH magazines started showing up late in the month of the Publication date.  I NEVER got the June issue of CQ.  The July issue arrived the first week of August.  I am still waiting for the August dated issue. Popular Communications is also showing up VERY late.

Several weeks ago, I wrote to CQ about this.  They promptly sent me the June issue by first class mail and said I could expect the August issue around August 21....Obviously, I am still waiting. They did mention "a problem" with the printer was causing the delays. 

Maybe they are trying to get everyone to go to the Digital version ?  

I have several years remaining on both magazines.  I sure hope they are not going "belly up"....



Problems with the printer usually go away once you start paying them.   Wink
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NB3R
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« Reply #76 on: August 31, 2013, 02:33:49 PM »

Seems the mag is getting printed.  It is making it to the newsstand on time.  Probably no money for postage.

I work for a large magazine printing company.  This behavior is indicative of a magazine getting ready to cease publishing.
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6061




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« Reply #77 on: August 31, 2013, 05:21:16 PM »

...This behavior is indicative of a magazine getting ready to cease publishing.

Funny, that seems to be the opinion of a few here.  Since the internet and electronic publishing came out, hard copy magazines are getting fewer and fewer in numbers--just like small newspapers.
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N4NYY
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Posts: 4821




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« Reply #78 on: September 01, 2013, 01:41:17 PM »

Do the math. Printing costs. Postage cost. for 10,000.

Or, go online only. No printing, no postage costs.

I do not know if they are in trouble or not. But I know this for sure, it is not because of these authors having to be paid, or because these authors are out to make them fail or go out of business. Most businesses that fail was the result of piss poor management. I was the victim of this after losing my job for 18, which I did well. The upper management, not only ran the company into the ground, but when they get let go, they likely have golden parachute built into their contract. Some of the decisions were mind boggling. And if this is the case at CQ, it was not because of the writers.
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WB2AMU
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Posts: 51




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« Reply #79 on: September 02, 2013, 08:18:21 PM »

That is true.  The writers are not the cause of the problems for CQ Magazine.   I know personally that many of them have not received payment for over three years.  Many of them hung in their because of their dedication to the hobby.  There are some excellent VHF propagation and antenna articles that have been written in CQ VHF during the past few years by experts in the field.  It is a shame that they may never get paid if the magazine does not get back into financial health quickly.  There should have been some adjustment made to the business model and the changing demographics of the hobby that had occurred rapidly over the past five years.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #80 on: September 03, 2013, 04:39:48 AM »

I suppose that every publishing company that fails does so because of p--- poor management now, huh?  Sorry, not so.  Increases in paper, printing ink, and postage, not to mention electricity, paid employees, taxes and property upkeep all contribute.  Do the math.  When six or seven or more business expenses go up, the price of paying those expenses has to come from somewhere, and if a magazine raises its subscription rates to try to compensate, then it loses subscribers.  It's a no win situation.

Mind you, I'm not saying that it was not bad management, but there is a fine line where the fault crosses from bad management to overwhelming cost increases.  That's what you get from a financial system that encourages excesses and wringing every penny--and more--that can be had out of those paying, instead of encouraging control and responsibility.
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N4NYY
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« Reply #81 on: September 03, 2013, 06:15:48 AM »


Quote
I suppose that every publishing company that fails does so because of p--- poor management now, huh?  Sorry, not so.  Increases in paper, printing ink, and postage, not to mention electricity, paid employees, taxes and property upkeep all contribute.  Do the math.  When six or seven or more business expenses go up, the price of paying those expenses has to come from somewhere, and if a magazine raises its subscription rates to try to compensate, then it loses subscribers.  It's a no win situation.

Non-sense. Good management is all about managing changes in the industry, forecasting decreases in revenue and adjusting changes. You see examples all the time. Facebook and Google are perfect examples. Microsoft and RIM/Blackberry are perfect examples of failures.

With CQ, and 10,000 subscriber base is small by printing standards. As you may know, when you do things in small numbers, print, manufacture, build, etc, the smaller the number the much greater the cost. Most all print media has gone online. Most of the money is from online resources/aads. That is why many of the magazines are smaller. There is less advertisements in there.

Not sure if CQ is suffering from these issues. But back in the day, you needed an office with staff. Overhead. Printing costs, major overhead. Today, you can have those people work from home (as the writers do), and have a very small office, or none at all. Less overhead. Even if they employed the same amount of people with online only, they would have greatly reduced costs.

This ham radio magazine is in a small niche market. It is not SI. It is not TIME. If has limited readership.

And yes, piss poor management leads to most company failures. If you think that is not the cause of most company failures, then if you run a company, I would never work for you.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #82 on: September 03, 2013, 10:49:11 AM »

Non-sense?  No.  Any way you look at it, if your costs exceed your income you're going to fail, and unfortunately that is what's happening in most company failures these days.  You can cut costs to a certain point, but if you cut them any further, you're simply not going to be able to produce the product that people want--and as they drop your product, you'll cease to be able to maintain your business.

I never said that p--- poor management doesn't cause failure.  I said (I should say I meant) that not all (or even most) of company failures is due to p--- poor management.  There are plenty of companies out there that have failed from causes other than p--- poor management, and the other major cause is simply that the company couldn't bring in enough money to stay in business.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2013, 10:51:19 AM by K1CJS » Logged
N4NYY
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Posts: 4821




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« Reply #83 on: September 03, 2013, 04:17:17 PM »


Quote
Non-sense?  No.  Any way you look at it, if your costs exceed your income you're going to fail, and unfortunately that is what's happening in most company failures these days.  You can cut costs to a certain point, but if you cut them any further, you're simply not going to be able to produce the product that people want--and as they drop your product, you'll cease to be able to maintain your business.

Good management is not cutting costs. Any moron can do that. Good management sees reduced revenue, and comes up with ways to increases it. Be it ads, email, whatever.

Quote
I never said that p--- poor management doesn't cause failure.  I said (I should say I meant) that not all (or even most) of company failures is due to p--- poor management.  There are plenty of companies out there that have failed from causes other than p--- poor management, and the other major cause is simply that the company couldn't bring in enough money to stay in business.

I have now been at the street level of 2 failures for the employers I worked for. The management was piss poor. The decision making was piss poor. You could see it coming. It was the trainwreck that you were trying to wanr them with flags, flares, and signs, and they ignored it. Piss poor management is always the downfall of companies.

As I have come to believe, when you are a company with a hot product, you need to have the next hot product cooking in the oven. It can end very quickly otherwise.
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AA4PB
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Posts: 13032




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« Reply #84 on: September 03, 2013, 05:33:47 PM »

From what I've read, most start-up companies fail in the first couple of years because they don't have enough capital investment to support them until they start making money. I agree that you always need to keep engineering staff busy coming up with the next "hot" product or you will just fade away. With small one-man operations you come up with a good product and then realize that you have turned into the secretary, the sales guy, the shipping guy, etc. and product development comes to a halt.  Sad

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WB2AMU
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Posts: 51




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« Reply #85 on: September 04, 2013, 06:13:54 AM »

The whole publishing business (books and magazines) has seen drastic changes in recent years, particularly in the last five years alone.   There is an adversion by many people to having too much paper, so reading news and articles on-line is a standard practice.   Books in paper are produced less with both kindle and e-books being a big part of the market.  Technical books or those books with lots of photos will probably still hold the market in some form.   I find this true with aviation books in which there are typically many photos.  Likewise ham radio books with charts and photos would have some share of the market, although not that great in size.   I think that internet locations for contest scores will become the way of the future too.   Thus with less demand for a paper magazine, there will be drops in advertisement for the paper magazine.   The business model is changing rapidly and those companies that see this quickly and adjust accordingly will survive, although in a very different form than what they used to be, only a few years ago.
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W8IFI
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Posts: 23




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« Reply #86 on: September 04, 2013, 10:16:43 AM »

I renewed my subscription in April. I got the April and May issues and since then nothing.
There is no excuse for this, especially with no letter of explanation. The last edition on the newsstand was CQ in April and no Popular Communications. Indicates to me that they are probably in deep financial doo doo. 

An email with explanation doesn't cost much.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2013, 10:20:53 AM by W8IFI » Logged
KR4BD
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Posts: 245




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« Reply #87 on: September 04, 2013, 11:59:57 AM »

I renewed my subscription in April. I got the April and May issues and since then nothing.
There is no excuse for this, especially with no letter of explanation. The last edition on the newsstand was CQ in April and no Popular Communications. Indicates to me that they are probably in deep financial doo doo. 

An email with explanation doesn't cost much.

Yup...  Things seemed to have gotten squirrelly for BOTH CQ and PopComm last May.  I believe some of the previous posters have "hit the nail on-the-head" in that CQ is still printing the magazines (as they are still on-line and on some news stands) but don't have money to mail issues to paid subscribers anymore. 

To add to this, CQ took over World Radio a few years ago.  When this happened, Lifetime subscribers (like me) to WR were told their subscriptions would no longer be valid, but would be given something like three years added to their CQ subscriptions and access to WR on-line.... 

Well, within months, WR "went away" and anyone who wanted to receive it electronically going forward, would now have to pay again...

Oh well....
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K4FMH
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Posts: 269




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« Reply #88 on: September 04, 2013, 12:23:59 PM »

WB2AMU,

You make very good points here. It's easy to assert that "good management foresees all" but those who have managed a large operation or business would mostly differ. What Google (free apps), Apple (cheap, legal music), and other "disruptive" companies have amply demonstrated is that only a few have the vision to see such drastic changes. Who at Kodak was able to really see the revolution in digital pictures that would change the "Kodak moment" into another companies (e.g., Canon, Nikon)? And, as you've articulated in this post, magazines like CQ are struggling. Monitoring Times just couldn't make the transition to digital fast enough to withstand the short-run cash drop to make a mom-and-pop operation worthwhile (see interview with Bob Groves on Ham Radio Now).

As you've also noted, many have gone to digital reception of periodical subscriptions. I like getting QST, CQ, MT (until December, at least) in digital form partly because I can tap on a URL, temporarily go to an advertiser's website to see a product, and immediately return to where I left off. More difficult with paper!

I received my new CQ magazine earlier this week via Zinio. It's a great issue. If payments to authors are due, I hope they get paid. I don't get the print version. But I do know that "jobbers" (distributors) get them to B&N and other retailers who carry them. Print distribution is not very often handled by the "publisher" but out-sourced to companies who specialize in that task for a wide range of publications. It's the result of further specialization. The distributor(s) have problems, too. And they don't result from non-payment by magazines. They are able to screw-up without benefit of knowing what Accounts Receivable knows about!

Now, I actually CALLED CQ Magazine and spoke to Cheryl, head of Customer Service. They HAVE had a problem with their printer (an outsourced company...they don't print in-house!). But, Cheryl says, it's been corrected and print issues shouldn't be influenced in the future. Time will tell but this is from the horse's mouth. It's also why the digital version has not been hindered as they ship the digital image through a digital distributor (Zinio). No conspiracy to "get" folks to shift to digital or anything. Cheryl doesn't handle author payment so she couldn't speak to that. But, N4NYY, why doesn't you or your friend (who says he didn't get paid), CALL CQ Magazine at 516-681-2922 and speak to either

Richard S. Moseson, W2VU, Editor, or
Gail M. Sheehan, K2RED, Managing Editor?

Richard W2VU was at the CQ Publications booth in Huntsville at the hamfest last month. He's not hiding from anyone!

By the way, did I mention that I was a professional writer and editor for a major scientific publisher? Don't remember if I did or not.  Roll Eyes

73 de K4FMH
Frank


The whole publishing business (books and magazines) has seen drastic changes in recent years, particularly in the last five years alone.   There is an adversion by many people to having too much paper, so reading news and articles on-line is a standard practice.   Books in paper are produced less with both kindle and e-books being a big part of the market.  Technical books or those books with lots of photos will probably still hold the market in some form.   I find this true with aviation books in which there are typically many photos.  Likewise ham radio books with charts and photos would have some share of the market, although not that great in size.   I think that internet locations for contest scores will become the way of the future too.   Thus with less demand for a paper magazine, there will be drops in advertisement for the paper magazine.   The business model is changing rapidly and those companies that see this quickly and adjust accordingly will survive, although in a very different form than what they used to be, only a few years ago.
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N4NYY
Member

Posts: 4821




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« Reply #89 on: September 04, 2013, 02:52:48 PM »


Quote
But, N4NYY, why doesn't you or your friend (who says he didn't get paid), CALL CQ Magazine at 516-681-2922 and speak to either


From what I understand, he did. And the poster who started this thread (whom I do not know personally), said he has called and emailed, both with no response.

Better yet, since you know these people so well, and support them with your money, you can send them the link to this thread.

And FYI, one person, who read this thread and whom I also do not know personally, PMd me here and said that CQ owes him in excess of $5,000.

At this point, CQ has no credibility. So I asked the people who are owed money to consider small claims court. You can sue up to $10,000 in small claims court, without needing an attorney.

Oh, I am glad you drank the Koolaid about their issues with their printer having problems. That is laughable. The problem is likely that they did not pay a printer. The printer likely has other clients with much bigger circulations that would be a death sentence if a printer was down for an extended period of time. But you bought that line. 
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