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Author Topic: AT&T U-verse  (Read 40267 times)
N9LCD
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Posts: 161




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« on: August 08, 2013, 01:58:07 PM »

Signed-up for AT&T U-verse high-speed internet to replace Earthlink dial-up service. 's Yeah, I got "speed" but that's about all.
 
1  A router with an ON/OFF switch.  I have to pull the plug to turn it off.

2  A LONG wait, like 3 to 5 minutes before I get broadband service on both ports.

3  A "Gateway Authentication Failure" if I try to go online without broadband to both ports.

4  Frequent periods of "intermittent" service.  Then you time out and have to start over again.
    Especially bad if you're sending data and don't know if it's been received.

5  Terrible service in rainy or wet weather.  I had EIGHT periods of intermittent service 
    during a one-hour rain.

6   Bi-monthly episodes on NO broadband service for an hour or more.

7   TECH SUPPORT?  Ha, ha!  During one broadband srvice outage that lasted over 3 hours, I
     called Tech Support.  NO live person.  Just "Select * for *". Then, I got "We
     you a signal ... We have to send a technician out to check the wiring on your end.  There's
     a $95 service charge if the problem is in the wiring in your premises."

     Well, I didn't accept the service call and, guess what, broadband service was miraculously
     restored.

As a gentleman, I can not use the appropriate terminology to express my opinions about AT&T U-verse in a place where they may be read by women and children.

N9LCD

 Angry
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12669




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« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2013, 02:09:03 PM »

Broadband is usually intended to be an "always on" service. That's why there is no on/off switch on the modem/router and you should not be unplugging it when not in use. Each time you power it up it has to re-authenticate and log back on to the system before it can establish a connection to your computers on the local network (LAN).
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KG6YV
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Posts: 504




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« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2013, 10:25:25 AM »

Great answer to part of the problem AA4PB....
Routers need to be on 24X7 or you will wait up to 5 minutes to get back on line.  Not only that, if you keep disconnecting frequently, you may find that when you power up again and the router tries
 to log you on with the lengthy authentication, any and all software glitches during the process can result in unsuccessful authentication.  It is the nature of IP networks that things can get hung up part way thru the process 1 out of 20 times or so.  IP nteworks are best left online permanently.  Especially those that have high traffic and many users (like a broadband commercial network).

FYI
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WB6DGN
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Posts: 584




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« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2013, 07:51:47 PM »

Quote
Broadband is usually intended to be an "always on" service. That's why there is no on/off switch on the modem/router and you should not be unplugging it

If that's the case, looks as though I go back to dial-up (or, better yet, cancel internet altogether).  When I go to sleep, or leave the house, I will NOT leave any switching power supply powered up, including the computer itself.  I am NOT about to come home to a burned out house or, worse yet, be burned up with it.
I trust switching supplies about as far as I can throw them (NO, not even that far) and, as far as I'm concerned, I can throw them all in the nearest dumpster.  The stress placed on the components in a switching power supply (especially the capacitors) far exceeds that of any other electronic device I've ever encountered and, in the ones that I've examined, protective devices are few and far between.  NO THANKS!  NOTHING on the internet worth taking that kind of risk.
Tom
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AF6WL
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Posts: 129




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« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2013, 08:49:50 PM »

Many failures seem to occur at power up - possibly due to inrush currents or thermal cycling; suggesting keeping things on 24-7 is actually best for reliability.

Possible exceptions being:
if there is a fan bearing or similar mecanical part involved.
or if the device is badly designed and over stressed thermally or electrically from the get go.

If in doubt make sure the PSU is UL certified.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2013, 09:00:12 PM by AF6WL » Logged
WB6DGN
Member

Posts: 584




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« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2013, 11:47:19 PM »

Quote
if there is a fan bearing or similar mecanical part involved.  or if the device is badly designed and over stressed thermally or electrically from the get go.

My biggest concern is the hammering that capacitors, and to a slightly lesser extent, semiconductors take from the high current pulses that comprise the switching regulator.  I have not seen a design that circumvents this characteristic of the devices and, therefore, must conclude that it is a characteristic of ALL switching power supplies.  In my mind, it is too high a price to pay for the, admitted, efficiency of the devices and I cannot be convinced that it is not a safety hazard coupled with the fact that tolerating these "overloads" is a necessary and usual part of a switcher's topology.
I am not much more approving of a linear power supply that uses a switching regulator though I will concede that, at least, they usually employ the same safety devices that a normal linear supply uses and they share some of the efficiency of a switcher without the size and weight benefits.  At least, if I HAD to use one of those, I wouldn't be paranoid about not shutting it off while unattended though I'm not that fond of the utilities that I am willing to give them one more penny than I actually use and enjoy!
Tom
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K1ZJH
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Posts: 898




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« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2013, 11:26:03 AM »

Switching supply caps are hammered 24/7/365... if they die after being powered off, and turned back on, it is pretty safe to assume they had reached an very high ESR before being powered down. Failure at power up is only an indicator that they had dried out and reached a high ESR prior to turn off. Failed electrolytic caps in this service often work until the the supply is turned off and back on.

Pete
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AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12669




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« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2013, 12:32:10 PM »

Lets see... I probably had in excess of 100 switching power supplies running 24/7 at my office and never had a fire. That included cable modems, routers, computers, monitors, speakers, printers, cameras, and a host of other devices.

Many devices still have AC power applied to the switching supply even if you turn the device off. The only way to remove that is to pull the plug out of the wall outlet. At home that includes the TV set, the cable DVR, the blue ray player - anything that can be turned on/off with a remote control or a push button switch. If I pull the plug from the DVR then it takes 15 minutes to reboot and reload the channel guide after I plug it back in before I can use it. Even the washer, dryer, and microwave have circuits in them that run 24/7 from a switching supply.

I have a friend who had a cable modem that did Internet and telephone service. She complained that it took the computer a long time to get Internet after turning it on and that all of her house phones died about 2 hours after turning to computer off. She was convinced that the phones somehow were routed through the computer. When I went over and looked, she had the modem plugged in to the power strip with the computer. She turned to strip off, the modem lost power thus lost the Internet connection. The phones stayed up until the back up battery in the modem died. She was worried about the high cost of electricity to keep the modem powered 24/7 when she wasn't using it. Every time she turned on the power strip it took the modem several minutes to reconnect and log on to Comcast to regain the services. The modem/router won't even serve an IP address to the computer until it boots and has service. There is ONLY one possible solution - leave the modem powered up and connected 24/7 like it was designed to do.

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KB1ZHF
Member

Posts: 2




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« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2013, 08:45:42 PM »

I had a modem that had a on off switch. It just disconnected the computer from the modem, but the modem stayed in contact with the ISP. There is a computer help call in radio show on a local AM radio station , where there is someone looking for help with their AT&T non service every week.
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KD0REQ
Member

Posts: 849




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« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2013, 11:02:32 AM »

not familiar with the U-verse CPE, but if there is a switching wall-wart, then head down to Rat Shack and get an analog... or hit the junkbox... or go someplace like Jameco online.

//edit// OK, I just went to fleabay and looked at them.  the CPE is similar to some of the stuff we have in our Qwest-now-CenturyLink area.  there is no problem getting a wall wart to power that stuff.  just make sure voltage is the same, current capability is same or higher, and the polarity and size of the barrel plug are right.  not saying they are the same, the software is tickled for each telco, just like the bands are different if your Yaekencom was made for Europe instead of the US market.

I have not heard of any wall-tick switchers flaming out, but I have seen analog wall-warts melt away.
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K1ZJH
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Posts: 898




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« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2013, 08:08:08 PM »

Many failures seem to occur at power up - possibly due to inrush currents or thermal cycling; suggesting keeping things on 24-7 is actually best for reliability.

P
If in doubt make sure the PSU is UL certified.

Many times the caps in switchers will develop a high ESR after many hours of use. Once they are powered down and back up, they may not restart.

Pete
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N9LCD
Member

Posts: 161




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« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2013, 06:49:29 PM »

I'm resigned to waiting for the modem to power up.

My complaint centers around the poor quality of AT&T Uverse broadband service.  Today, WITHIN 30 MINUTES OF SIGN-ON, broadband service was completely lost TWICE.

Last week, broadband service went down in the middle of completing an 8-page form.  Had to log-in and start from scratch, again, as usual.  Lost about 45 minutes of work.

And when it rains, uVerse broadband becomes intermittent.  Last time we had a moderate rainfall, I had eight 2 to 3 minute episodes of intermittent service in 1 hour.

And Tech Support?  BARF!  You can't even speak to a live person.  All they want to do is
send out a tech and chrge you about $95 for the service call.

N9LCD

 Angry Angry Angry
   
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K7RNO
Member

Posts: 279




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« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2013, 09:32:01 PM »

If that's the case, looks as though I go back to dial-up (or, better yet, cancel internet altogether).  When I go to sleep, or leave the house, I will NOT leave any switching power supply powered up, including the computer itself.  I am NOT about to come home to a burned out house or, worse yet, be burned up with it.

Not saying this cannot happen, but it appears it is not happening at the frequency you fear. Professional counseling might be the way to a better night's sleep and an always on modem  Smiley
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73,
aRNO
NAQCC #6870, SKCC #11131
NO9E
Member

Posts: 382




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« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2013, 08:03:46 AM »

Had same symptoms. Could have been due to large distance from the control box -- half a  mile, and perhaps a cut cable.

I switched to cable. Faster and more reliable albeit more expensive.

...
And when it rains, uVerse broadband becomes intermittent.  Last time we had a moderate rainfall, I had eight 2 to 3 minute episodes of intermittent service in 1 hour....
 Angry Angry Angry
   
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KD0REQ
Member

Posts: 849




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« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2013, 12:36:39 PM »

you appear to have U-verse DSL and the cable plant is bad.  ATT is responsible for the plant up to your demarcation point (surge suppressor,) and if you have phone on the digital line, they have to fix it on their nickel, it's an FCC issue.  easy call if there is static on the POTS, tell them there is static on the line and it also bumps the DSL.  they have to take care of the SOL situation.

I had a tubload of modem errors in my Qwest DSL which all went away when I moved the modem to the demarc and plugged the house wiring into the "phone" jack.  we call that a "home run" installation in the biz, and it's required for a tech install at speeds 20 Mbps and up.  the cause there is the home internal wiring, which is almost universally NOT Category 3 or better.

I'd home run now and see if it fixes things.  check your own modem errors, put the modem control address in your browser and poke around, you are looking for "uncorrected bit errors" or "CVs".  most consumer DSL modems run an address of 192.168.0.1, the oldest of Cisco modems used a 10 level address.  most wireless access points are 192.168.0.2, but you have to jack directly to an ether jack on the access point to get past security.  safe bet is use ether jack 1.  some don't allow root on any other jack.  my personal standard when I had 56K frame relay 2+ decades ago was growing over 50 errors a day, and I called it in.  on DSL, I flip out when I have a customer with over 120-150 uncorrecteds.

there are some computer OS that are better than others in one respect... finding out who is on your local network.  for Macs, just bring up networking, and you can see every identity of equipment on your side of the wire, and their IP address.  with others, you may need to install a freeware sniffer tool to find random IPs.

on authentication... depends on the equipment at the ISP side of life, but there is older software in some core routers (I am thinking of Juniper in particular, Cisco fixed this years ago) in which you can only pool 10,000 IP addresses to DHCP out to users.  a particular ISP does not have to upgrade their SW unless it's too much of a pain for them to reboot the card(s) that run dry on the address pool.  you can't fix that in customer land.  another reason to leave the modem running 24/7.

tip of the iceberg, I get paid well for chasing this stuff in the infrastructure and working with field techs who get stumped.  we have creepy F3s in some places as well.  the guy who doesn't call isn't ever going to be made happy.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2013, 12:45:57 PM by KD0REQ » Logged
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