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Author Topic: direct tv  (Read 3039 times)
N4JTE
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« on: August 08, 2013, 03:23:43 PM »

Sitting in hotel room, traveling construction project manager, and every time it rains the signal goes out.
I wonder what snow and ice would do.
Is this typical of Direct TV or just a crummy install here at the Days Inn in NJ ?
Bob
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KE4JOY
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« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2013, 04:02:06 PM »

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rain_fade
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N4JTE
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« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2013, 04:34:20 PM »

And I lost internet till rain stopped in other words direct tv sucks!
Tnx for link, guess the designers should have read that, hi
Bob
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VE3FMC
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« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2013, 06:13:47 PM »

I have satellite tv, supplied by Bell ExpressVu.

When it rains hard, or the dish gets covered with wet snow the signal is lost. Not because the system sucks, it is simply because the satellites that are miles in the sky get blocked out by the rain, or snow. Snow is simple, just go clean the dish off. Rain, different story, wait until it stops raining hard.

It has to be a torrential downpour before the signal is lost.
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W5FYI
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« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2013, 06:52:26 PM »

Yes, heavy rain will attenuate the satellite signal, and the solution may be a larger dish.

OTOH, I use a Yagi antenna to watch local digital TV channels. Guess what?, heavy rain also attenuates their UHF signals, too. It's exasperating to have it happen during tornado season, as I live about 15 miles from Moore, Okla., hit heavily on May 2nd by an EF5 tornado; and only three miles from the path of the world's widest recorded tornado just days later.

Call it progress....
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N2MG
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« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2013, 05:52:12 AM »

It has to be a torrential downpour before the signal is lost.

I've had DirecTV for years and am very satisfied.  Sure there are issues, but nothing's perfect.

As far as the signal goes, I've had it where the signal was lost when it wasn't raining on me, but it was raining vigorously to the south (which is in the path of the signal). 

Also, while the snow can be a problem, it's really quite rare  for me - and I've attached a small whisk broom/brush to a piece of pipe and can dust off the dish from the ground if it gets bad. 

Note: I live in upstate NY where I have the disadvantages of 1) lots of snow (>120" per year on average), 2) the dish points low so there is LOTS of atmosphere through which the signal much travel (path loss). However, there's one advantage: the low angle (~34°) means the dish itself is close to vertical so the snow doesn't accumulate much.

Mike N2MG
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K0JEG
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« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2013, 06:45:39 AM »

It has to be a torrential downpour before the signal is lost.

I've had DirecTV for years and am very satisfied.  Sure there are issues, but nothing's perfect.

As far as the signal goes, I've had it where the signal was lost when it wasn't raining on me, but it was raining vigorously to the south (which is in the path of the signal). 

Also, while the snow can be a problem, it's really quite rare  for me - and I've attached a small whisk broom/brush to a piece of pipe and can dust off the dish from the ground if it gets bad. 

Note: I live in upstate NY where I have the disadvantages of 1) lots of snow (>120" per year on average), 2) the dish points low so there is LOTS of atmosphere through which the signal much travel (path loss). However, there's one advantage: the low angle (~34°) means the dish itself is close to vertical so the snow doesn't accumulate much.

Mike N2MG

Always have a laugh when I see a dish mounted on a roof here in Colorado. Didn't anyone tell the installer that it snows out here?
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N4JTE
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« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2013, 06:46:45 AM »

Funny as I read this there is a nice big dish tv advert to the left of the comments, same thing happened when I dissed bazooka antennas, gotta laugh!
Bob
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N2MG
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« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2013, 06:51:53 AM »

Funny as I read this there is a nice big dish tv advert to the left of the comments, same thing happened when I dissed bazooka antennas, gotta laugh!

The commercial version of Big Brother snooping. Wink
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NK7Z
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« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2013, 07:50:21 AM »

Sitting in hotel room, traveling construction project manager, and every time it rains the signal goes out.
I wonder what snow and ice would do.
Is this typical of Direct TV or just a crummy install here at the Days Inn in NJ ?
Bob
I have DirecTV here, and have for at least the past 5 years...  I can count the time I have had the signal fade on one hand...  OK, maybe two hands...  The service here is very good, and I see Rain fade maybe once a year, maybe twice...  I had a new dish put on a few months ago, the largish one, that covers multi birds, and probably with less gain--  one fade is all...

Also, I have no RFI from the whole home system either.  I had the installers add ferrite beads during install...
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Thanks,
Dave
For reviews and setups see: http://www.nk7z.net
KG4RUL
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« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2013, 09:03:06 AM »

We have Comcast cable for Internet and TV.  In the last 30 days, there have been two losses of service, for over four hours, each incident.  The first case, someone accidentally dug up the feed and the backup systems did not work.  Come to think of it, that is the same reason given for the second interruption.   Roll Eyes
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K1CJS
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« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2013, 10:28:23 AM »

One very important thing in the installation is the pointing of the dish.  If its a few degrees off, you'll still get a signal that fair to middlin' and you'll get good service--until the bad weather shows up.  Then it'll fade or drop out entirely.  Most installers do the pointing quite well, others probably are in a hurry--or it's the last job of the day....  The installers have the notice of the minimum signal strength that should be available in your area, and as long as the dish provides that, they won't bother fine tuning it.

The thing is if you keep losing signal, have the service people come out and repoint/remount the dish.  The signal shouldn't drop out every time it rains.
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2013, 11:24:06 AM »

Sitting in hotel room, traveling construction project manager, and every time it rains the signal goes out.
I wonder what snow and ice would do.
Is this typical of Direct TV or just a crummy install here at the Days Inn in NJ ?
Bob

I vote for the latter, crummy install...
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KD0REQ
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« Reply #13 on: August 09, 2013, 12:39:58 PM »

if you go to the menus and to the install menu, there will be a tone and a bar meter that are used to indicate signal level... the tone for when you are on the roof, louder and lower is better.  I have a 72 to a 76 on the bar meter from this install, and we do get from 4-6 rain fades a year and a couple snow fades.

in the apartment, I had an 82.  dish was on a pipe attached to a 2x12 that was held on the balcony with two sandbags, and I pointed it myself, instead of having the guy with the handheld meter do it.

I improved my fade issues in the apartment by putting a garbage bag over the dish, wrapping it around the pole, and taping it down.  this stopped accumulation of dust and mist, and snow slid right off.

being older and a little less spry, I haven't gone on my roof to do the same (and the installer, as usual, didn't put a ground to the dish like code requires.)  when I eventually go up there to inspect the chimney I will bag it.  we had enough snow nose buildup on the roof last winter to cover the dish up to the LNB, so naturally we were watching our cat-wrasslin' show on the carpet for a few days until I got more Avalanche snow removal poles and got to it.

there are slicks who sell dish covers for up to $30 on the web, but a plain old Hefty bag is just as good.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2013, 12:43:06 PM by KD0REQ » Logged
KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #14 on: August 09, 2013, 01:02:02 PM »

Not very likely those menus and other things are going to be accessible to a user in a motel room...
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