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Author Topic: Looking for first JT-9 qso  (Read 7305 times)
RSHIRE22
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« on: August 08, 2013, 07:05:01 PM »

I am a newbie to JT-9 and haven't worked any stations yet in that mode. In fact I haven't seen one the past two days so I'm not sure how to spot one. I suspect the signal looks like a WSPR trace but a little wider bandwidth. I have also been transmitting a call near 14.076. I am using WSJT-X software which works fine in JT-65 mode. I have a seven call sign so please look for me in JT-9 mode this evening (Thursday August 9) if possible.

Thank you in advance. Guess everyone is busy. Thanks anyway for reading.

Ron
« Last Edit: August 08, 2013, 07:39:43 PM by RSHIRE22 » Logged
RSHIRE22
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« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2013, 07:12:21 PM »

Oops August 8.
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KG6AF
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« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2013, 08:04:29 PM »

If you want to operate JT9 on 20 meters using WSJT-X, set your rig to upper sideband and your VFO to 14.078.  WSJT-X displays signals from roughly 1kHz to 2kHz above that frequency, or between 14.079 and 14.080.  I just went on 20 a few minutes ago and saw about 4 JT9 signals there.

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WB0FDJ
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« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2013, 04:02:07 PM »

Ron

When I first installed WSJTX the first thing I did was spend some time with the "owners manual". Yeah, I know, real men don't read owners manuals and especially hams.  Grin But seriously if you haven't, take a look. The newest software is "bilingual", as Joe calls it, and it's possible to be able to decode either JT-65, JT-9 or both at the same time. He goes step by step about how to set up the software. Unlike the older WSJT suite, this newest software has all the features we wanted with WSJT but didn't have. However setting it up is a little different.

I set it up once in the "bilingual mode" to see if it worked, (it did) but decided to set my preferences to run JT-9 only. Most evenings now, up until the wee hours, I am seeing anywhere from 2-4 signals. Fair amount of DX when the bands are working that way. But as KG6AF said, set the VFO to 14.078 to hear the JT-9 stuff.

Will look for you and good luck.

Doc WB0FDJ 73
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K0YQ
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« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2013, 07:14:32 AM »

If you want to operate JT9 on 20 meters using WSJT-X, set your rig to upper sideband and your VFO to 14.078.  WSJT-X displays signals from roughly 1kHz to 2kHz above that frequency, or between 14.079 and 14.080.  I just went on 20 a few minutes ago and saw about 4 JT9 signals there.



Yes 14078 or 10138.  Listen for what sounds like a constant tone birdie, but off at ~50 seconds past each minute.  I think JT9 traces kind of look like a psk waterfall.  Make sure that you adjust your incoming audio level via the WSJT-X bar.  I always have to knock down my audio levels to decode JT9 signals properly.
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KJ8U
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« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2013, 12:44:38 PM »

You don't always have to wait for strong signals.  Watch the scope and when you see a faint signal, move the frequency bug on the scope to that signal. You'll be surprised what can be decoded.

Try visiting pskreporter.info, set the requirements for your call, freq and mode. After a few minutes of transmitting, you can view what stations around the world have received your signal. Doesn't they will respond, but they can at least hear you. 
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