Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Cheap handhelds lead to bootleggers?  (Read 8101 times)
KE4JOY
Member

Posts: 1335




Ignore
« on: August 11, 2013, 02:51:22 PM »

Quote
I own 12 Baofeng radios. I have equipped my hospital maintenance and security officers with these.

Wow really? This was on a review page for the 2/440 HT .. __ ..
Logged
KC9NVP
Member

Posts: 65




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2013, 04:04:04 PM »

Not sure which model he is referring to, but the KG-UV6D I use will cover both ham and commercial freq (136-174 MHz & 420-512 MHz) so I can see someone with a commercial license saving some money by purchasing this model.  Would need to know how the radios are programmed to know if he is operating within the law or breaking it.

David, 73
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 5879




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2013, 07:18:31 AM »

As long as those radio aren't being used on a ham frequency....
Logged
KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5694




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2013, 01:48:27 PM »

Well, back when Radio Shack was selling their '202 HTs like hotcakes, we did indeed have a bit of trouble locally with a few more bootleggers than "normal" but most of them weren't even trying to actually bootleg or talk to other hams, no, it was a situation where guys were buying them for communication on construction sites, or deer hunting, that sort of interference from operators who didn't even know they might be on the input of the repeater, etc. 

Proliferation and lowered cost of gear that can access the ham bands will likely always produce its fair share of these kinds of problems, the newer Chinese HT offerings are likely to be no exception. 


73
Logged
K6LCS
Member

Posts: 1499


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2013, 04:31:24 PM »

If such "abuse" were to occur anywhere, it would be here in Southern CA - the most populous region of the nation's most populous state ...

Fortunately, there has been very little "abuse." It's scary knowing what havoc one *could* cause with these units that transmit far beyond the amateur bands ... but problems have been few - so far ...

Clint Bradford, K6LCS
http://www.work-sat.com
Logged

Clint Bradford, K6LCS
http://www.k6lcs.com
K5TED
Member

Posts: 699




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2013, 10:12:52 AM »

Quote
I own 12 Baofeng radios. I have equipped my hospital maintenance and security officers with these.

Wow really? This was on a review page for the 2/440 HT .. __ ..

Not sure why he opted for the dual banders since the land mobile service he uses probably only uses VHF or UHF but not both.

For commercial/industrial use, comparing the cost of a monoband VX-231 at $180 with a monoband Baofeng 666 at $29, it's easy to see why the latter might be enticing with the 6:1 cost ratio. However, there is absolutely no comparison in durability. The first time a security officer or maintenance worker gets cut off from communication due to equipment failure in a critical situation, that cost advantage disappears.
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4391




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2013, 01:43:35 PM »

There is an argument ( I don't know if the FCC accept it , but it is here  in Europe) that if a unlicensed user is in a band and he gets interfered with, that is his hard luck. That complies with the international radio regulations and even the FCC might have a problem in court with that.

It certainly happened with a MacDonalds in the UK  using voice on 433.92 MHz - illegal  in the UK.......not only where they told it was "tough sh*t" that their orders were interfered with but unless they stopped using the radios immediately, they were liable to up to anything up to 6 months in jail!

I believe they were, to use the vernacular, " pi**sed off". Tough sh*t!
Logged
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2765




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2013, 06:37:30 PM »

Doesn't that mean "drunk"? ... Grin  Or, "drunk off" to be more correct...
Logged

73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 459




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2013, 12:05:14 AM »

Quote
I own 12 Baofeng radios. I have equipped my hospital maintenance and security officers with these.

Wow really? This was on a review page for the 2/440 HT .. __ ..

Not sure why he opted for the dual banders since the land mobile service he uses probably only uses VHF or UHF but not both.

For commercial/industrial use, comparing the cost of a monoband VX-231 at $180 with a monoband Baofeng 666 at $29, it's easy to see why the latter might be enticing with the 6:1 cost ratio. However, there is absolutely no comparison in durability. The first time a security officer or maintenance worker gets cut off from communication due to equipment failure in a critical situation, that cost advantage disappears.

I've heard nothing but good things regarding these inexpensive Chinese radios.  If you think that there's always a direct correlation between cost and reliability / durability, please compare Jaguars and Toyotas!

 Kiss
Logged
K6LCS
Member

Posts: 1499


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2013, 08:44:44 AM »

>> ... I've heard nothing but good things regarding these inexpensive Chinese radios ...

Then you need to expand your sources of information. There's plenty of well-documented problems with several models
of these HTs.

A couple things that make a radio worthless to me (but others seem to let slide, 'cause of the PRICE) -

-Reverse SMA antenna connection on many models - making my collection of SMA aftermarket antennas worthless (unless
purchasing adapter of unknown quality)

-Imprecise DTMF tone generation. Many a model do not generate the proper tone frequency combinations when using DTMF codes.
Not used an awful lot - but when you press "3" you want it to be a "3" and not something else.

-Ease and/or capability of field programming. Yes, any ham should "be prepared" before he or she walks out of the
house with an HT. But being able to field program is important. (No - I do not demand such from my commercial HTs -
but we're not talking about commercial use (I don't think we are in "eHam.net").) I used to think that the Yaesu VX-7R
was the most user-unfriendly HT on the planet to field program - until the recent crop of these HTs arrived. (And if you
HAVE mastered your VX-7R, I applaud you - you're a better ham than I ... )

-There was a large batch of one popular model that did not transmit CTCSS properly - making it impossible to his a repeater
you could literally see - because a few of its CTCSS tone were off-frequency.

-There was a large batch of these that would not scan memories that were programmed at or below a certain CTCSS tone.

And on and on.

SO - If all you have heard is good things, then you haven't really researched these very well. But in your defense, ALL of
the above well-documented problems - what I, personally deem as "fatal flaws" of rigs that I would never personally
own and use - are being overlooked by scads of hams, SOLELY DUE TO THE PRICE of the units.

When it comes to reliable two-way radio communications, I just do not believe in "disposable" rigs. I do not believe ANY club or
search and rescue organization or community event organizer should be depending upon such rigs - ESPECIALLY when the
safety of the public is concerned.

Clint Bradford K6LCS
909-241-7666 - cell

Logged

Clint Bradford, K6LCS
http://www.k6lcs.com
KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5694




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2013, 03:18:07 PM »

IMO, any safety organization that purchases these cheap HTs is likely doing the public a service. 

And that is because, hopefully, the nonworking HTs and lack of comms will help to keep such idiots away from the public during a bona fide emergency! 
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 5879




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2013, 06:00:07 AM »

>> ... I've heard nothing but good things regarding these inexpensive Chinese radios ...

Then you need to expand your sources of information. There's plenty of well-documented problems with several models
of these HTs....

I was unlucky enough to get one which was dead on arrival at my doorstep.  When I called to find out about a replacement for it, what I heard from the supplier was "Oh geez, another one..."  From that statement I changed my mind about getting a replacement and requested a credit on return.  Yes, it was right after they came out, and the quality could have improved since then, but I'll never try another one.  That's why I'm so dead set against them in my posts here.
Logged
KE4JOY
Member

Posts: 1335




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: August 18, 2013, 04:07:56 PM »

You guys know that Baofeng are sending out radios with NO charge in the batterys right? It states in the manual that you need to charge the batts for 'at least 5 hours' before using. This might explain some of the DOA's.

I just got one through Amazon and am hard pressed to find anything wrong with it. Although it is brand new.
Logged
N5INP
Member

Posts: 750




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: August 18, 2013, 04:23:31 PM »

You guys know that Baofeng are sending out radios with NO charge in the batterys right? It states in the manual that you need to charge the batts for 'at least 5 hours' before using. This might explain some of the DOA's.

I've purchased two Baofengs so far, and a third larger battery too, and all had a good charge on the battery. I'm extremely satisfied with the whole lot.
Logged

K1CJS
Member

Posts: 5879




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: August 19, 2013, 05:12:54 AM »

You guys know that Baofeng are sending out radios with NO charge in the batterys right? It states in the manual that you need to charge the batts for 'at least 5 hours' before using. This might explain some of the DOA's.

I just got one through Amazon and am hard pressed to find anything wrong with it. Although it is brand new.

I do know enough about batteries to realize that they need to be charged before any prolonged use.   Cheesy  I did charge it before I even tried the radio, tried cleaning battery and radio terminals and doing the usual troubleshooting short of voiding the warrantee, and the radio was still dead.  The way I took the comment was that they were getting back a few radios from possibly a bad batch of them, and I didn't want to chance getting another DOA.

As I said in another thread, with the reports that have come out--the DOAs and the units that failed over a short period of use--I rather think that the Icom HT I have had for over a decade and am still using is going to be more economical in the long run even if it did cost me $125 in the beginning.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!