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Author Topic: Debian 6 beyond the cloud to ISS  (Read 14065 times)
W9GB
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Posts: 2616




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« on: August 12, 2013, 12:24:51 PM »

In case you missed this announcement in May 2013.

Debian beyond the cloud
http://www.debian.org/News/weekly/2013/10/

Keith Chuvala, the manager of Space Operations Computing (SpOC) for NASA,
announced that the agency will switch to Debian on the International Space Station's laptops.
Specifically, the ISS astronauts will be using computers running Debian 6.
Chuvala mentioned they needed an operating system that was stable and reliable,
and that they will rely on the Linux Foundation for training their astronauts and IT specialists.
In other words, ISS laptops no longer run Windows.

ZDNet article
To the space station and beyond with Linux
Summary: The International Space Station's laptops are moving from Windows to Linux, and R2, the first Linux-powered humanoid robot in space, is now under-going in-flight testing.
Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols
May 6, 2013
http://www.zdnet.com/to-the-space-station-and-beyond-with-linux-7000014958/

List of Linux Adopters
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Linux_adopters
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AB2YC
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« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2013, 06:47:28 PM »

Pretty cool

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K5LXP
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« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2013, 06:19:21 AM »

Even IBM switched to Linux years ago for many of their products and services.  Among the best selling laptops today are Chromebooks.  Windows as an OS is quickly becoming irrelevant.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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KA4NMA
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« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2013, 12:05:57 PM »

Can I download and install Debian on my windows netbook and have a dual boot option so I can boot into either windows 7 or Debian?
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K0JEG
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« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2013, 08:08:11 PM »

Can I download and install Debian on my windows netbook and have a dual boot option so I can boot into either windows 7 or Debian?

Absolutely. In fact, that's the way most people do it. The easiest way to do it is to download a "live CD." You can try out Linux without having to install anything on your machine, just pop in the CD and boot (you might have to go into the BIOS and change the boot device order to CD then HDD if your PC isn't set up to do that. Once you've tried it out you can use the same CD to install the OS on your drive.

I use Ubuntu, which is based on Debian. I've found it's drop dead simple to get going, although if you've never partitioned a hard drive I'd read up on the process first. One strike against Ubuntu is their "Unity" interface. It's a little bit like a tablet interface, with lots of big icons and full screen application windows. But if you don't like it, it's very easy to install other GUI options like GNOME.
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KA4NMA
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« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2013, 10:48:40 PM »

I have a netbook which means no cd drive.    Any other ideas?  It would be nice is somebody could send me a jump drive that I could either do the live test version or the full version.

Randy ka4nma
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K5LXP
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« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2013, 06:40:26 AM »

I have a netbook which means no cd drive.    Any other ideas?  It would be nice is somebody could send me a jump drive

Creating a bootable USB stick with one or more OS's on it has been around for a while but sometimes the hardware can be persnickety about booting from USB.  You can certainly go down that road if you have the time and energy to do that and see how far you get.

This may sound extreme but it works for me - buy another machine to try Linux on.  In this day of brand new $200 laptops that come with Linux already installed, or buying a used desktop or laptop for very little money I think you're way ahead.  In years past I used to spend hours upon hours doing partitioning, formatting half a dozen filesystems and carefully crafting a boot manager to create a house of cards system that could boot multiple OS's for all the things I wanted to do.  Today, I still run multiple OS's but most are on different machines now and they share data on a simple home network.  If I need to do a windoze thing, fine, I fire up the windoze box.  For linux things I can use any one of multiple machines, some with multiple versions of Linux on them.  There's a W2K box in the shack, DOS on my radio bench, a dual boot Doze7/Ubuntu laptop and a couple more desktops that serve as test platforms.  I could care less about what the OS is, that's just the means to the end - the application I need.  No OS does everything today so I use whatever OS on whatever hardware I need to get what I want done. 

Anyway, my point is especially if you're not familiar yet with some of the underpinnings of Linux and especially dual or multiboot techniques, get yourself another machine (can be a $50 hamfest special or an orphan/cast-off) to experiment on.  I see way too many posts in the Linux forums I frequent where people try to do dual/multi boot on their primary machine, bollocks it up and then it's a train wreck of lost data and OS reinstallation.  Contrary to how many in the Linux community will tell you that it's "easy" I would disagree.  Maybe easy for them but for someone who is only familiar with the windoze paradigm, Linux is a foreboding, unintuitive and unfamiliar world you cannot google yourself through.  Install it on a dedicated machine where experiments have little risk and mistakes are more readily recovered from.  Once you get it figured out you can start to transition it to your primary machines and gain the benefits of computing freedom.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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KA4NMA
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« Reply #7 on: September 20, 2013, 08:52:37 PM »

I want to test drive Debian.  Being disabled and economically challenged, I do not have the funds to invest if it is something I do not like.

Randy
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K5UNX
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« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2013, 11:30:24 AM »

I used to like Ubuntu, but never used it much. I now have a Virtual Machine running Linux Mint. It's based on Ubuntu, but has a much better desktop interface instead of Unity which is horrible. I used Debian for a while but like Mint better.

You can download most versions of Linux and make a bootable USB key. If you have the hard drive space, you could also download VirtualBox and run Linux in a Virtual Machine until you decide if you like it. I do that on my work laptop so I can use Linux. That works very well.

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