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Author Topic: Should I get on the air, even though my CW is very slooowwwww?  (Read 30951 times)
KA0HVE
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Posts: 117




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« Reply #15 on: August 23, 2013, 06:45:52 AM »

Something else I want to suggest that seems obvious but maybe isn't - eavesdropping.  Eavesdrop on QSOs, lots of them.  Also, write down what you hear.

For me, there was a big difference between listening to perfectly sent code from W1AW code practice sessions and a QSO between two hams on the air.  There's also a big difference between just listening and writing while listening.

When I went to have a QSO it was difficult to keep up while writing down what was received.  As you practice it becomes at least more automatic.  I think it also aids the brain to decode code without thinking about it nearly as much.
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KA0HVE
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Posts: 117




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« Reply #16 on: August 23, 2013, 10:10:02 AM »

http://www.fpqrp.org/BBITS/BBQ0309.pdf

Scroll down to this part: Eight Reasons CW Ops Stay Off the Air
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3722




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« Reply #17 on: August 23, 2013, 07:46:36 PM »

HVE:  Thanks for the link OM.  Very interesting!  Bookmarked it for reading when I have more time.  Sounds like a fun group.

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RENTON481
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Posts: 60




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« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2013, 11:44:55 PM »

As an SWL who is learning code I would say yes, get on the air.  If you listen around the CW sections of the 40 and 20 meter bands you will hear plenty of slow speed QSO's by hams who are doing slow speed CW.  You won't be in bad company.
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WB0HZL
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Posts: 24




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« Reply #19 on: August 24, 2013, 08:52:35 PM »

By all means, get on the air! We all have been there, we make mistakes - so what. On air experience is much better than copying off a record, tape, computer.  I have to agree with others, stay off of 20 meters for now.

Any good CW operator started slow and worked up and they will, or should, slow down for a slower speed operator. One word of caution (ok several words) never send faster than you can receive.

That is my two cents worth, hope to work you some time - SSB or CW, slow or fast - it does not matter. Good Luck!

73,
WB0HZL/DW5HT
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M0LEP
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Posts: 200




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« Reply #20 on: August 25, 2013, 01:58:34 AM »

I have to agree with others, stay off of 20 meters for now.

From Thailand he may not have all that much choice unless the propagation's being really helpful. Parts of 40 metres still get flattened by broadcast over that side of the globe, if my listening from Australia earlier in the year was any guide...

...but 30 and 17 will likely have more gentle pile-ups.
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KE4ILG
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Posts: 150




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« Reply #21 on: August 25, 2013, 10:49:04 AM »

Some really great comments and suggestions which I echo.  If I could shout it louder I would, GET ON THE AIR!!

In my early days of cw operating I would write a list of everything I would want to say. 
Ke4ilg
Mike
Jacksonville, NC
Icom-706
dipole up about 35 ft
retired Marine

So when I would get excited all I had to do was look at my list.  It may seem extreme to write my own name down but I didn't have to think about it.  73, Mike ke4ilg
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K2MMO
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #22 on: August 29, 2013, 05:51:32 AM »

What are you waiting for lots of great qso's on the bands every day.The only way to pick up your speed is my tapping out those letters
When you cal CQ and you get and answer and you find the operator is moving a little bit quicker than you like ask him to QRS most "hams"will slow down We were all in your shoes
Relax and enjoy soon you too will be tapping out at a good speed.
73
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K0ZN
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Posts: 1542




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« Reply #23 on: September 02, 2013, 07:59:34 PM »


 AMEN !!  YES !   Get on the air. Your speed will pick up much quicker if you get into active QSO's.  EVERYBODY starts off slow !!  I don't know of anybody
 who was born on this planet and instantly capable of 20 WPM !

 DO NOT be afraid to ask another station to QRS.  If you have the bad luck of running into one of the rare "jerks"....don't fret....HE is the guy with the problem.
 Say "73" and move on!  That said, I would not recommend answering a CQ by some guy sending 30 WPM....he, by definition, is looking for a high speed QSO.  Common sense applies....

 DON'T be afraid to call CQ. You may not get a pile up, but you will accumulate some QSO's.  Tell people you are new to CW and learning.....98% of them will
fully understand and work with you. CW is still pretty much old school ham radio with a lot of fraternalism and friendship..... it is not like the unfriendly cliques on 75 M SSB. The bottomline is most CW operators WANT to encourage new CW op's and will QRS to work you. Free advice:  try to send the best CW you can (i.e. proper spacing between characters, letters and words) at a speed you are comfortable with.....not the fastest you can send.

73,  K0ZN
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KF7ATL
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Posts: 51




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« Reply #24 on: October 02, 2013, 01:49:54 PM »

Simon,

We were all once where you are now. We'll slow down for you.  I'll work you any time you want, no matter how slow. Besides, I still need Thailand!

Garth, KF7ATL
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KE7WAV
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Posts: 126




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« Reply #25 on: October 02, 2013, 05:17:59 PM »

Get on the air and give it your best. 40M at 7.100 to 7.120 tends to have a lot of ops willing to go slow. I'd be happy to chat with you no matter how slow.
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N4DSP
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Posts: 124




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« Reply #26 on: October 02, 2013, 05:46:02 PM »

I bought a Sierra Wilderness rig a few years ago off Ebay.  Great little rig, but I've still not got on the air with it.  One reason was because I was working away from my home base.  The other reason is because my CW speed is somewhat slower than a very slow snail.

I've read recent posts about the best way/learning technique to increase my CW speed.  In my mind, the best (and most enjoyable) way would be to get on the air, send QRS many times, and then work those stations who slow down to my snail's pace.

What's your opinion?  Get on the air at a snail's pace, or wait until my CW speed reaches double figures?

Simon

Get on the air and have a go at it. I believe the slower or new to cw hams usually congregate about 50khz up from the lower band edge but I could be wrong on this. Check into it.
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NK7Z
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Posts: 744


WWW

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« Reply #27 on: October 02, 2013, 08:46:02 PM »

I bought a Sierra Wilderness rig a few years ago off Ebay.  Great little rig, but I've still not got on the air with it.  One reason was because I was working away from my home base.  The other reason is because my CW speed is somewhat slower than a very slow snail.

I've read recent posts about the best way/learning technique to increase my CW speed.  In my mind, the best (and most enjoyable) way would be to get on the air, send QRS many times, and then work those stations who slow down to my snail's pace.

What's your opinion?  Get on the air at a snail's pace, or wait until my CW speed reaches double figures?

Simon
Simon,
In short yes, you should get on the air!  If someone will not QRS, find another...  The only real way to increase speed is to work people...  When I started I could do just barely 5 WPM.  I can now do 40 WPM, or better, and the way it happened was by getting on the air at 5 WPM...  I will be happy to work you anytime, ant any speed you feel good at.
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Thanks,
Dave
For reviews and setups see: http://www.nk7z.net
WA7SGS
Member

Posts: 42




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« Reply #28 on: October 09, 2013, 09:07:01 PM »

This site uses the Koch method of teaching Morse code.  Compared to they way I learned it over 40 years ago, I consider it superior since it teaches instinctive reaction to the sound at a speed better than 5 WPM.  I got 5 WPM in one week of study back in the day but I never could receive better than 12 WPM or send better than 14 WPM despite much practice.  I still can't send for squat but using the Koch method is helping me to receive faster speeds much easier than I did doing it the old fashioned way.

http://aa9pw.com/morsecode/

As for getting on the air with slow CW, that's fine.  It beats not being on the air at all...LOL!  Some day you may find conditions for phone are lousy but the CW can get through.

Rick

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W4KA
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #29 on: October 10, 2013, 04:51:47 AM »

Yes you should.  How do you think fast cw ops started?  They got on the air, lots of slow cw ops on and I will slow down and work anyone when I'm on the air.  Good luck.  David
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