Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Looking for Windows XP  (Read 13915 times)
KK6GNP
Member

Posts: 158




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: August 22, 2013, 05:17:17 PM »

Think outside the box that MS Windows has created..... Linux!

I use it daily, mostly as a server platform (Ubuntu, CentOS, BSD Unix, etc).  Ubuntu Desktop is the best way to experiment with Linux on a PC though.  It's not Windows, so you have to be prepared to explore a new world if you are unfamiliar with it.
Logged

73 ~ Cory (JeepEscape)
KK6GNP
W8JX
Member

Posts: 6679




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: August 22, 2013, 07:08:51 PM »

Think outside the box that MS Windows has created..... Linux!

I use it daily, mostly as a server platform (Ubuntu, CentOS, BSD Unix, etc).  Ubuntu Desktop is the best way to experiment with Linux on a PC though.  It's not Windows, so you have to be prepared to explore a new world if you are unfamiliar with it.

As I have said before, Linux is stable but lack of a universal GUI and app support leaves it badly wanting.
Logged

--------------------------------------
You can embrace new computer/tablet technology and change with it or cling to old fall far behind....
W8JX
Member

Posts: 6679




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: August 23, 2013, 05:08:26 AM »

For fellow computer nerds, here's a picture of my current build: http://i.imgur.com/Q5zgF.jpg

I've been building my own gaming computers since the 90's, overclocking the first generation Celeron and Pentiums. This was the first time I used a full size tower case.  Even though it is huge, I won't go back to a mid tower again until the tech shrinks down to nothing.  Not only is the cooling far superior, but having the room to get my hands in there and work on it is priceless.  Also has hot-swap SATA ports, and some cable management built in.

Gaming computers and case modding is one of those hobbies where you can go as deep as you want with the money spent. I'm not into mods or heavy overclocking these days.  I always pick a target and go for the best bang for the money.  I spend a little over $2000 on this with most of the money in the graphics cards.  I really dig the nearly silent liquid cooling for the CPU too.

I used to overclock a lot in years past and was into gaming but not any more. I have a old P4 Prescott 3ghz single core that I ran at 3.5 ghz for years. Still have it and it still boots and runs but do not use it. Old Celeron overclocked really well but the small L2 cache hurt them. I do not overlook anymore as modern cpu's are cheap and fast and cooler running. You can have a lot of power in a laptop these days too if you pick hardware right. SSD's are very nice but still pricey. I use 7200 rpm drives with 32 or 64 meg caches. A hybrid drive that is a combo of SSD and platter is nice too. SSD's are future but they have a way to go yet on size and price.
Logged

--------------------------------------
You can embrace new computer/tablet technology and change with it or cling to old fall far behind....
AK7V
Member

Posts: 251




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2013, 08:33:07 AM »

Think outside the box that MS Windows has created..... Linux!

I started running Linux in 1997.  I stopped a couple years ago.

It's great if you enjoy tinkering with your computer.  It was a full-time hobby in the early days, before package management and easy-to-use "distros."  Even now, though, there are enough quirks that make it difficult for someone who just wants things to "work."  And for people who want to tinker, the bloated "distros" are too windows-like to be much fun, IMO.

Last time I ran Linux I used Gentoo -- nice because you compiled everything for your specific machine, weren't immediately burdened with KDE or Gnome, and the package management system actually did a great job with dependencies. 

Now I run Windows 7.  I don't want to be limited in what software I run and I don't want to spend time fiddling with WINE, trying to get everything to work.  That novelty has worn off for me.
Logged
KD0REQ
Member

Posts: 1050




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: August 29, 2013, 11:47:58 AM »

@K4RKY assuming the drivers are there for your laptop.  you could try running Ubuntu off the install disk to see if it's happy.  if so, take dual-boot option when you actually install it.
Logged
N1DVJ
Member

Posts: 530




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: November 14, 2013, 05:21:07 AM »

You can pick up XP for about $30 on eBay.  There's a ton of OEM disks with COA labels out there.  Almost as if Dell dumped their inventory to a Job Lot store.

I recently got a laptop that was 'returned' to work.  It had Win7 on it but the person returning it wanted to make a 'statement', so it was returned with EndPoint encryption activated and no password. 

It wasn't worth the hassle, so I just blew away the endpoint software and picked up an XP install disk from eBay, for the $30 I mentioned (including shipping)  Went right onto the machine.  Of course, the CD was for Dell, and this was a Lenovo so I had to go download almost 2Gig of drivers from the Lenovo support site to get it to more than just power up.  Took about 15 updates till I got all the network stuff working, then went on to Microsoft to register and activate XP.  The first update (the CD was SP3) still showed 148 updates, and I let it run over night.  Then 49 updates after a reboot, then 9 after a reboot, then...

It took 5 updates and reboots till it came back as Microsoft said it was up to date.  I still have a few OEM things to update from Lenovo, but hey, I got the thing for nothing but the effort and the XP disk. 

It has a COA on the case for WIN7, so I just need to borrow an install set from work and copy it if I want to go to WIN7, but I figured XP would be a quicker path to see if I can get it recovered and working first.
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 6679




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: November 14, 2013, 06:27:28 AM »

I figured XP would be a quicker path to see if I can get it recovered and working first.

Not really because in a few month it will no longer be supported for updates and re-installs will not have updates. Really a waste of time to install it now. You really want at least Vista...
Logged

--------------------------------------
You can embrace new computer/tablet technology and change with it or cling to old fall far behind....
N1DVJ
Member

Posts: 530




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: November 14, 2013, 07:33:07 AM »

Uh, XP went in on a single CD, not 4-7 DVDs.  XP was up and running in the time I took a break after breakfast.

Will I move on to WIN7?  Eventually?  Sure.  But there was absolutely no reason to do so now.  Well, ok, the fact that I have a valid WIN7 COA, but still.  Just to make a copy of the DVD set for WIN7 would take me over 4 hours at work...  And that's assuming I could dedicate a machine and time to it.
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 6679




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: November 14, 2013, 08:42:25 AM »

Uh, XP went in on a single CD, not 4-7 DVDs. 

Never used more than one disk for any Window OS. As far as speed, on good hardware Vista and 7 install quick. I remember I friend that had two new Win 7 machines with quad core Intel CPU's and 4 gig of ram that he down graded to XP a few years ago. While it was snappy on 7 it was a slug on XP because while XP can see more than on CPU, the kernel is not really built for it. Vista and above is built for true multicore support. I have a 6 year old Intel quad core 64 bit vista machine with 8 gig of ram. While I upgraded power supply, video card and hard drive a few years ago it has never been reloaded. Still a very quick and solid machine.
Logged

--------------------------------------
You can embrace new computer/tablet technology and change with it or cling to old fall far behind....
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6061




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: November 16, 2013, 09:57:04 AM »

...Just to make a copy of the DVD set for WIN7 would take me over 4 hours at work...

Win 7 fits on a single DVD.  I burned a copy of Win 7 beta to install from an ISO file, and it took me a little over a half hour to make.  The copy of Win 7 Ultimate I finally bought contained two DVDs, one a 32 bit install disk, the other a 64 bit, and both were complete on a single DVD.
Logged
N1DVJ
Member

Posts: 530




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: November 16, 2013, 03:36:18 PM »

Well, it would be nice if I had access to an original install disk, but unfortunately I don't, not at this time and not for this machine.   I would have to generate one of the recovery sets, which is currently at 4+ disks.

But that's not the issue.   Geesh, the guy just asked where he could get an install disk for XP.  And of course there's always those that chime in with 'go linux' no matter what you ask about Windows.

And yes, I HAVE run linux.  I've run BSD4.2 way back in the days before linux, in the early 80's.  I've done Red Hat.  Ubuntu.  And Suse.   
Logged
M6YDB
Member

Posts: 50




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: November 16, 2013, 10:42:51 PM »

IMHO you would be better to move to Win 7 or 8.1 and then install VMPlayer (now free for personal use) and install a virtual XP and a virtual Linux machine also.

You then get the best of all worlds - VMplayer in use is simply stunning.  I have two monitors and on one I have my main Win 8.1 desktop and on the other my XP virtual machine (some ham programmes only work on XP) and swapping between them is just as easy as swapping between programmes running on two montitors.

I can also booth the Linux machine whenever required also.

Get 4Gb in and do that

Danny M6YDB
Logged
N0IU
Member

Posts: 1375


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #27 on: November 17, 2013, 04:43:31 AM »

Even if you did get a copy of XP, it won't work anyway... at least I never got it to work. In Microsoft's eyes, going from Vista to XP is a "downgrade" and the folks in Redmond really don't like it when you downgrade the products they worked so hard to develop. I thought it would be easy enough to wipe out the Master Boot Record on the hard drive like we used to do "back in the day" with an FDISK\MBR command, but no such command exsists (AFIK) in Vista. I even tried creating a boot disk with the old commands and that did not work.

The bottom line is that I have been using Vista pretty much since it came out and I have yet to find any piece of amateur radio software that it won't run.
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 6679




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: November 17, 2013, 05:18:33 AM »

The bottom line is that I have been using Vista pretty much since it came out and I have yet to find any piece of amateur radio software that it won't run.

I too have used Vista 32 and 64 bit for about same time and on good compliant hardware with enough RAM it is a very solid OS. Most of Vista's early problems were the OS was ahead of hardware and it was loaded on machine not really Vista compliant. Win7 is nothing more than a tweaked Vista and Hardware was up to task when it launched.
Logged

--------------------------------------
You can embrace new computer/tablet technology and change with it or cling to old fall far behind....
KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 472




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: November 17, 2013, 12:31:24 PM »

The best of both worlds is Windows XP installed into Virtualbox on a Unix type OS.  I have XP on a Virtualbox running on Mac OS X, and it is all I need for those obscure amateur radio programs that are not yet ported to Unix.

We also need to encourage more amateur radio software developers, especially the big ones (KYI) to make software that will work across different platforms.  I heard about this new language called Java invented by a young kid named James Gosling...
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!