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Author Topic: Icom R-7000 add a cooling fan  (Read 4181 times)
WA4053SWL
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« on: August 25, 2013, 07:44:53 PM »

Hello all,
I have a receiver Icom R-7000 and is working with 12 VDC and a regulated power supply of 20A, not heat practically nothing, anyway would like to add a mini fan in the rear panel.
My question is if the 12vdc wire (positive and negative) of the fan can connect in parallel with the wires that feed the receiver.
Thanks for reply.
Have a nice day.
73 George
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N4NYY
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« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2013, 08:46:38 PM »

Yes, but it will run when the power supply is off. If you want to connect it to switched 12V of the radio, it would be better.
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WA4053SWL
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« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2013, 09:41:05 PM »

Ok, thanks for the reply,
I not understand how the fan can work with the power supply turned off, it is assumed that the fan wires would go on parallel with the 12 vdc wires coming out of the receiver to the power supply and both, fan and receiver, would have voltage when the power supply is turned on.
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N4NYY
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« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2013, 04:24:54 AM »

I meant to say it would run when the radio is off.
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KE3WD
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« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2013, 05:44:47 AM »

?

The R7000 is a Receiver only, the Icom manual spec states that it draws a mere 1.7A MAX from the AC line.  Which means that realistically there will be about 150W of energy period:  (125 X 1.7) X .707 

Same spec page in the manual lists the Usable Temperature Range as:  +60C  (140F)

Unless you are attempting to operate this receiver in extreme climate conditions, such as out on the desert somewhere, it really won't be necessary to put a fan on the thing. 

In other words, if the receiver is in an environment where you yourself are rather comfortable, and it is not enclosed in some sort of custom cabinet or the likes, but is where normal convection airflow can cool the rear of the thing, adding a fan won't really accomplish anything of value, not even the idea that you might extend component life or the likes. 

And, the fan will also just add noise to the receiving environment, which can contribute to making weak signals even harder to copy without earphones or the like. 


73
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KJ4FUU
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« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2013, 10:32:52 AM »

Does the R7000 have a heating problem, or is the original poster confusing it with the IC-7000 transceiver, which does have a heating problem?

-- Tom
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N4NYY
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« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2013, 11:55:22 AM »

?

The R7000 is a Receiver only, the Icom manual spec states that it draws a mere 1.7A MAX from the AC line.  Which means that realistically there will be about 150W of energy period:  (125 X 1.7) X .707  

Same spec page in the manual lists the Usable Temperature Range as:  +60C  (140F)

Unless you are attempting to operate this receiver in extreme climate conditions, such as out on the desert somewhere, it really won't be necessary to put a fan on the thing.  

In other words, if the receiver is in an environment where you yourself are rather comfortable, and it is not enclosed in some sort of custom cabinet or the likes, but is where normal convection airflow can cool the rear of the thing, adding a fan won't really accomplish anything of value, not even the idea that you might extend component life or the likes.  

And, the fan will also just add noise to the receiving environment, which can contribute to making weak signals even harder to copy without earphones or the like.  


73

I just googled this and appears there are mods for this because it runs hot. At first when I posted, I thought it may of been a boatanchor, but it is solid state. Apparently, the the cause is the internal power supply. So if the poster was using a 20A external, that would defeat the purpose of a fan.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2013, 12:03:09 PM by N4NYY » Logged
KE3WD
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« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2013, 12:38:37 PM »

I don't care if the OP is using the internal AC supply or an external 20 or even 100A power supply, the thing is still only going to draw less than 2A.  1.7A to be exact. 


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N4NYY
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« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2013, 12:50:32 PM »

I don't care if the OP is using the internal AC supply or an external 20 or even 100A power supply, the thing is still only going to draw less than 2A.  1.7A to be exact. 




I do not care either. I was just telling you that he is likely putting a fan in there because there were heat complaint online. And if the cause was an internal PS, then putting a fan on when you use an external is a waste. Assuming that s the true cause of the heat.
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WA4053SWL
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« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2013, 01:59:20 PM »

Does the R7000 have a heating problem, or is the original poster confusing it with the IC-7000 transceiver, which does have a heating problem?

-- Tom
The R-7000 has heating problems and also the R-71A, the internal power supply is the primary cause of failure in this series of receivers, so, it's a good idea to run all these receivers off external 12VDC to prolong the life of the component if you will use it a lot, may not be necessary to place a fan, I think, thanks for your time and replies.
73 George.
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KE3WD
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« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2013, 02:23:01 PM »

If the internal power supply is truly the cause of excessive heating, and you have bypassed the internal supply by using a separate DC supply, then you've solved the heating problem already, no need for the fan.

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