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Author Topic: Internet Radio?  (Read 14833 times)
N5RWJ
Member

Posts: 461




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« on: November 01, 2013, 08:44:22 AM »

What is it and do you use it?
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WA8ZTZ
Member

Posts: 38




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« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2013, 01:16:00 PM »

Just recently got involved in this myself with a WiFi internet radio from C.Crane.  It is stand alone ...no computer required, however, you do need an internet connection either wireless or ethernet LAN.  Still just getting up to speed on this myself but the C.Crane website is very helpful and will probably answer most of your questions.   Smiley
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KA7ZIS
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Posts: 19




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« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2013, 04:56:50 PM »

I've been using internet radio for a couple of years now. There is plenty to listen to. I think I remember hearing a 2 meter repeater as an internet radio station along with a 40 meter station but they are kind of raunchy.

I enjoy old time radio shows, Amos & Andy, Johnny Dollar, Dragnet, Richard Diamond are just a few that are available.

Here is a link to check out the old time stuff....

http://archive.org/details/oldtimeradio

The files can be streamed, or downloaded (the files are public domain).

I put the files on a Synology NAS and stream to a Logitech Internet Radio.
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N8FNR
Member

Posts: 136




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« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2013, 09:13:05 AM »

I have a Grace Mondo internet only radio in our kitchen http://www.gracedigitalaudio.com/mondo-p-212.html
The built-in search function lets you find virtually any format or country that you can imagine. We listen to various stations around the US and love this little wi-fi radio!

Zack
N8FNR
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KC2WI
Member

Posts: 31


WWW

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« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2013, 07:32:03 PM »

Internet "Radio" may be a form of broadcasting or transmitting but it is not radio. There is no RF being transmitted/broadcast/radiated.
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VK3DWZ
Member

Posts: 37




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« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2013, 03:51:20 AM »

I've never understood this Internet wireless thing.  If I want to listen to a wireless program, and shortwave is not providing it, I "tine" in via the computer and listen thru the tiny, and tinny, loudspeakers.
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KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 459




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« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2013, 03:51:28 PM »

Internet "Radio" may be a form of broadcasting or transmitting but it is not radio. There is no RF being transmitted/broadcast/radiated.

What about something like this:  websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901 ?

Is this internet radio close enough to a real radio for you?
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W5ARP
Member

Posts: 53




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« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2013, 11:07:19 PM »

Internet "radio" uses the term radio the way most of the population uses the term--a remote station that programs and broadcasts music to you, not how scientists, engineers, and hams use the term--i.e. RF.

A little over a decade ago, I set up a realplayer stream for the local public radio station, so you could listen to their broadcast stream, from long distances away.  Those sorts of streams have been around for a while, and exactly mimic broadcast.  A newer approach has been to dynamically build custom playlists based on your preferences.  Pandora, iTunes Radio, Rdio, all take this approach.  There is no DJ, and you have a limited ability to skip songs you don't like.

In the end I don't do broadcast music (internet or air) because I own over 1000 CDs, all ripped to mp3, and my taste is kind of uncommon. So I just play the music I own.
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N6HBJ
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Posts: 136


WWW

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« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2013, 08:08:25 AM »

I've never understood this Internet wireless thing.  If I want to listen to a wireless program, and shortwave is not providing it, I "tine" in via the computer and listen thru the tiny, and tinny, loudspeakers.

Now a days, they have some good quality computer speakers with base. In addition, there are smartphone apps where you can listen to over 60,000 radio stations and plug your phone into a stereo for play.
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N6HBJ
Member

Posts: 136


WWW

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« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2013, 08:10:39 AM »

If you have a smartphone, there are apps available to listen to the over 60,000 internet stations. My favorite is "Tunein radio".

Most RF radio stations also feed their programs on the internet. So if you have a fav station and are out of range, internet radio allows you to listen from anywhere around the world.
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KAPT4560
Member

Posts: 78




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« Reply #10 on: November 30, 2013, 01:32:16 AM »

 I listen to websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901 regularly and consider this a class of 'Virtual Radio' since it really is coming from a 'receiver'. I have also registered and tried Global Tuners. http://www.globaltuners.com/
 It is interesting using someone else's antenna in another part of the world. It gives you a perspective of propagation and programming that you normally wouldn't have.
 Both Apple and Microsoft offer streaming programming that covers a wide variety of tastes. The broadcast stations around here are becoming unpleasant to listen to, although there are some rural AM stations with that old-fashioned hometown feel.
 My wife doesn't like listening to static and hetrodynes and I don't like the digital audio harshness.
 The offensive advertising, political or tabloid gossip formats of broadcast radio I can do without also.
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KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 459




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« Reply #11 on: December 02, 2013, 07:53:02 PM »

I listen to websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901 regularly and consider this a class of 'Virtual Radio' since it really is coming from a 'receiver'. I have also registered and tried Global Tuners. http://www.globaltuners.com/
 It is interesting using someone else's antenna in another part of the world. It gives you a perspective of propagation and programming that you normally wouldn't have.
 Both Apple and Microsoft offer streaming programming that covers a wide variety of tastes. The broadcast stations around here are becoming unpleasant to listen to, although there are some rural AM stations with that old-fashioned hometown feel.
 My wife doesn't like listening to static and hetrodynes and I don't like the digital audio harshness.
 The offensive advertising, political or tabloid gossip formats of broadcast radio I can do without also.

The advertising is my primary annoyance at broadcast radio.  Many times it goes on for ten minutes or more at a stretch.  Almost as annoying is the compression applied to the program material, and the even greater compression applied to the ads.  It makes listening to the radio a very fatiguing experience.  These days I prefer recorded material, but I will still tune in the radio every once in a while for A Prairie Home Companion.
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