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Author Topic: Kenwood TS-480 vs Icom IC-7000  (Read 31670 times)
AC4RD
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Posts: 1235




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« Reply #45 on: September 06, 2013, 02:44:29 PM »

 I still have to get into a couple antennas, power supply, antenna tuner, cables, etc.

Cory, just one more piece of uninvited advice:  Don't BUY an antenna until you've been active for a while.  It's easy, fun, and inexpensive to make your own antennas instead of using store-bought ones.  This is true for HF and VHF/UHF, though when you get up to HF yagis, storebought starts to be attractive.

Wire antennas on HF cost nearly nothing, they work great, and they're a world of fun to experiment with!  Simple VHF/UHF antennas can be made with brazing rod and again cost nearly nothing.  You'll learn a lot more building antennas than you will buying antennas, and you'll have fun doing it.

Oh, and mobile antennas aren't quite as easy to homebrew as fixed-location antennas, but you CAN build your own mobile antennas, too.  :-) 

A lot of us are enjoying your messages, Cory--it's fun to see a newcomer having so much fun.  :-)  73 GL!  --ken
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KK6GNP
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Posts: 158




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« Reply #46 on: September 06, 2013, 03:59:42 PM »

I still have to get into a couple antennas, power supply, antenna tuner, cables, etc.

Cory, just one more piece of uninvited advice:  Don't BUY an antenna until you've been active for a while.  It's easy, fun, and inexpensive to make your own antennas instead of using store-bought ones.  This is true for HF and VHF/UHF, though when you get up to HF yagis, storebought starts to be attractive.

Wire antennas on HF cost nearly nothing, they work great, and they're a world of fun to experiment with!  Simple VHF/UHF antennas can be made with brazing rod and again cost nearly nothing.  You'll learn a lot more building antennas than you will buying antennas, and you'll have fun doing it.

Oh, and mobile antennas aren't quite as easy to homebrew as fixed-location antennas, but you CAN build your own mobile antennas, too.  :-)  

A lot of us are enjoying your messages, Cory--it's fun to see a newcomer having so much fun.  :-)  73 GL!  --ken


That's great advice, Ken, and it's advice I will follow.  The homebrew and electronics aspects of this hobby are extremely interesting to me.  I was already taking a look at some J-pole builds for VHF/UHF.  I'm still not sure what to do about HF here in my little neighborhood.  I'm probably going to have to put some kind of vertical up, attached to my house.  I won't be able to get away with much else here.  When I sell this house in a few years, I'll be looking for a place with much better options.

Any recommendations on a tuner for someone who is going to tinker with antenna designs?  Should I use something a bit more robust, or no?
« Last Edit: September 06, 2013, 04:06:45 PM by JEEPESCAPE » Logged

73 ~ Cory (JeepEscape)
KK6GNP
K9IUQ
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Posts: 2053




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« Reply #47 on: September 07, 2013, 05:00:38 AM »

Any recommendations on a tuner for someone who is going to tinker with antenna designs? 

MFJ-993B or one of it's brothers. Do NOT buy a manual tuner if you use under 300 watts. The 993B works seamlessly with the Icom 7000 and other radios. Push the tuner button in the radio and the 993B tunes automatically. I have owned one for long time, they are excellent.

This is the first MFJ tuner I have ever liked. They will tune anything.

Stan K9IUQ
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WY4J
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Posts: 112




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« Reply #48 on: September 07, 2013, 05:34:17 AM »

Stay away from the IC-7000 as this little rig is a ticking time bomb....

From the very first day I turned it on issues began popping up. Mine never broke but it did get extremely hot during CW operation. I placed a tiny computer CPU fan on top and this helped the situation quite a bit. The receiver is acceptable but it does have some annoying white noise again on CW.

The audio is not a strong point and even after sending the microphone out and paying $50 for a so called modification, the audio reports were the same. "You sound like you are inside a 55 gallon drum." I ended up purchasing a W2IHY 2 band equalizer and from then on everyone raved about the fantastic audio it had. But this after spending an additional $170 plus the connecting cable plus shipping.

The the straw that broke the camel's back was when I tied to connect a linear to it and the amp-key output occurred 8ms before RF occurs. Unfortunately, ICOM doesn't provide any means of adjusting this delay (Elecraft, Yaesu, and Kenwood have adjustments for this, and TenTec has a 15ms built-in delay). There is also a problem with turn-off delay with the IC-7000. I.e., it unkeys the amp 5-7ms BEFORE RF goes away. This can also be a problem with aPIN-diode switch. I tried a QSK switch and this did not work. The only thing that worked was using a foot switch and this was not the permanent option I was searching for. So the permanent option became the getting rid of the pretty little radio with all the options.

I guess the Icom people never thought that anyone would be crazy enough to try to connect a linear amplifier on CW to their little gem.

The little radio looks really pretty and has all the bells and whistles anyone could wish for but is not a well thought out little radio. I guess Icom radios are not being designed by their marketing department. 
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AC4RD
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Posts: 1235




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« Reply #49 on: September 07, 2013, 09:37:18 AM »

MFJ-993B or one of it's brothers. Do NOT buy a manual tuner if you use under 300 watts. The 993B works seamlessly with the Icom 7000 and other radios. Push the tuner button in the radio and the 993B tunes automatically. I have owned one for long time, they are excellent.

I'll chime back in to agree with Stan; I used a manual tuner for 20 years, but I bought an MFJ 927B auto tuner a couple of years ago, and it's really convenient.  I changed the ground-side screw terminal to a banana jack, like on the hot side of the output, and I've got banana plugs on the twinlead to my doublet, and one on my 140' wire; switching antennas takes just a second.  The tuner lives on the side of the house, with coax from the rig.  It's not *really* weatherproof, but in a protected place it does fine, and it works with balanced or unbalanced antennas.  VERY convenient!
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K9IUQ
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Posts: 2053




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« Reply #50 on: September 07, 2013, 02:46:42 PM »

it works with balanced or unbalanced antennas.  VERY convenient!

I use my MFJ 993B with my 7000. I use a 130ft doublet fed with 450 ohm ladder line. It works 80-10 mtrs automatically. VERY convenient!

Stan K9IUQ
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KK6GNP
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Posts: 158




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« Reply #51 on: September 07, 2013, 03:29:41 PM »

it works with balanced or unbalanced antennas.  VERY convenient!

I use my MFJ 993B with my 7000. I use a 130ft doublet fed with 450 ohm ladder line. It works 80-10 mtrs automatically. VERY convenient!

Stan K9IUQ


Does this tuner work well with other 100 Watt transceivers or is it best paired with a 7000?
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73 ~ Cory (JeepEscape)
KK6GNP
K9IUQ
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Posts: 2053




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« Reply #52 on: September 07, 2013, 04:14:10 PM »

Does this tuner work well with other 100 Watt transceivers or is it best paired with a 7000?


It will work with any radio however it is best used with the radio interface cable. This way you just hit the tuner button in the radio and it automatically tunes the antenna. This is extremely convenient.

Cables are available from MFJ for most recent radios. I made my own cable, very simple to do. The Tuner will work fine without a interface cable, just not quite as convenient.
Th MFJ-993B tuner handles up to 300 watts.

Stan K9IUQ
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VK4KX
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Posts: 12




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« Reply #53 on: September 14, 2013, 11:49:53 PM »

I have a TS-480HX and I love it and I think you would too it's great on all HF bands with 200w max out and 100w on 6m and I use an SG-230 auto tune when I need to tune any swr from a non resonant antenna.

73
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AF5CC
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Posts: 996




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« Reply #54 on: September 15, 2013, 01:32:52 PM »

I have a TS-480HX and I love it and I think you would too it's great on all HF bands with 200w max out and 100w on 6m

It should do 200 watts on 6m.  Much more important to have higher power on 6m than on HF.

John AF5CC
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W8JX
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Posts: 6421




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« Reply #55 on: September 16, 2013, 04:16:15 PM »

I have a TS-480HX and I love it and I think you would too it's great on all HF bands with 200w max out and 100w on 6m

It should do 200 watts on 6m.  Much more important to have higher power on 6m than on HF.

John AF5CC

Actually not true unless you are doing local ground wave QSO and in which case more power helps both.
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AK7V
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Posts: 251




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« Reply #56 on: September 16, 2013, 04:39:09 PM »

I know you specifically said you wanted to avoid used radios, but do reconsider.  All of my HF rigs have been purchased used and I have ended up with high-end rigs for good prices.  Perhaps it's luck, but I haven't gotten a "dud."  Most have been purchased here on eham from the classified section.

Right now I am using an Icom 756 Pro 3 that I bought in mint condition here on eham for a good price.  The new rigs under $2k weren't as appealing to me.  I am very, very pleased with it - it has been my primary HF rig for almost 3 years now.

Personally, I'm not a huge fan of small HF radios like the Icom 7000.  I've got a whole room dedicated to radio so there's no need to compromise on a little rig.
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M6GOM
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Posts: 987




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« Reply #57 on: September 20, 2013, 03:34:38 AM »

I ended up purchasing a W2IHY 2 band equalizer and from then on everyone raved about the fantastic audio it had. But this after spending an additional $170 plus the connecting cable plus shipping.


Why did you buy an overpriced W2IHY equaliser when even Bob Heil uses a $50 Behringer Xenyx 802 with an Icom 7000? Hell even Bob's main shack equaliser, an 8 channel Alesis Multimix 8 USB 2 FX is only $120. Bob even does a video on HamNation showing you how to connect it to the Icom 7000 using the 13 pin mini Din Icom supply with the radio.

You ended up paying $170 because you wanted to, not because you had to.

And why did you put a fan on the top? Given you didn't even get first degree burns, whilst hot to touch it wasn't hot to the point of causing damage. I have a 10MHz Rubidium Frequency Reference. The case of it reaches 120F far far hotter than the Icom 7000 does. You would put a fan on that because it is hot to the touch then wonder why the lock light never came on or took an hour to do so if it eventually did....
« Last Edit: September 20, 2013, 03:39:24 AM by M6GOM » Logged
G3RZP
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Posts: 4830




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« Reply #58 on: September 20, 2013, 03:41:22 AM »

The ARRL product reviews show the Icom to be an appreciably  cleaner transmitter.
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KK6GNP
Member

Posts: 158




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« Reply #59 on: September 24, 2013, 12:26:20 PM »

I called Ham Radio Outlet Anaheim today to ask a couple questions, told them I was a new ham, etc.  The guy I talked to seemed to be put-out by having to tolerate my two simple questions.  Needless to say, I'll be shopping elsewhere.  First impressions, people....
« Last Edit: September 24, 2013, 01:04:58 PM by KK6GNP » Logged

73 ~ Cory (JeepEscape)
KK6GNP
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