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Author Topic: "Walkie Talkie Skyscraper Melts Jaguar"  (Read 7106 times)
K0OD
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Posts: 2590




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« on: September 02, 2013, 08:36:41 PM »

Has more to do with optics than radio, but I couldn't resist clicking on that intriguingly titled news story today.

"A City skyscraper nicknamed the Walkie Talkie is reflecting sunlight so strongly it caused extensive damage to a Jaguar parked below."
http://metro.co.uk/2013/09/02/beam-of-light-from-walkie-talkie-skyscraper-melts-mans-jaguar-3946308/

Does this prove the Archimedes legend?
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4955




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« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2013, 10:55:08 AM »

If you design a building such that the bent glass looks like a reflective mirror, what do you expect?  I believe the excuse was that the 'designer's didn't expect strong sunshine in London'.

It seems these days that something labelled 'Design' is 'cool', 'good', 'advanced'. Mostly it seems to have been designed by people who can make it look nice but not work (or last) well. I might be biased - this week, I had fail, because of cr*p design, a 'fashionable' bathroom soap dish supposed to be held on the wall by a suction cup. Have these people never seen a balloon go down in a couple of days and realise the suction cup will leak? Or a potato masher where the pressure of an artificial rubber handle was supposed to hold the works in place?
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N1UK
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Posts: 1588




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« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2013, 11:43:23 AM »

I never trust those suction cups..you never when they are going to release their vacuum and fall but fall they will.

I had a suction cup radar detector mount on my windscreen, release and drop the radar detector right onto my Kenwood 2m mobile rig which caused one of the Kenwood LCD backlights to blow.

Imagine what that light focusing building could do in Florida or Phoenix...vapourise people maybe hi hi


Mark N1UK
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4955




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« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2013, 01:39:02 PM »

If only 'industrial designers' had to get real qualifications in engineering.......... but for so many of them, that is 'too hard'.

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KK6GNP
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Posts: 158




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« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2013, 01:59:16 PM »

Norway has similar plans for good, not evil...   Cool

http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/07/19/giant-mirrors-will-illuminate-norwegian-town/
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73 ~ Cory (JeepEscape)
KK6GNP
G3RZP
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Posts: 4955




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« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2013, 01:42:38 AM »

They're now getting problems with shops the other side of the street having chairs and tables damaged (a café) and plastic bottles melted ( a hairdressers). I can see the lawyers getting ready for some income!
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G8HQP
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Posts: 125




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« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2013, 07:39:04 AM »

I can't remember who said this:
"When architects were trained as engineers, they designed oil refineries to look like Greek temples.
Now architects are trained as artists, they design Greek temples to look like oil refineries!"

Our news reports are now full of scientifically-challenged journalists saying that it acts like a giant magnifying lens.
NO!!
It acts like a giant magnifying mirror - because that is precisely what it is.

If the designer had sharpened his pencil then, the lawyers would not need to be sharpening their pencils now.
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KD0REQ
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Posts: 1047




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« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2013, 07:56:13 AM »

it's an ivory-tower effect... "the world must bow to us, our building is all that counts."

your building will be sold to pay the damages, and the new owners will put plain old tinted glass in.  or 1950s chockablock painted panels.

next time, when you finally get a commission for a garden shed, remember... "form follows function."
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KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 411




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« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2013, 05:29:45 PM »

I'm curious as to how this bldg got its name. Are walkie talkies curved like that in the UK? They're not in the US. The cheap WT's of my childhood were flat, and FRS radios still are. My understanding is that Europe uses different freqs for their FRS system, which means different units. Europeans are big on "avant garde" design-I have a cheap battery clock from the UK (Lloytron) that is shaped sorta like a flying saucer, with a flat end on one end that shows the time. Industrial design is MUCH more boring in the US.
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4955




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« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2013, 12:50:33 AM »

Look at the US Army Signal Corps BC611.....or the early Motorola cell phones -  the ones almost the size of a brick.

The European equivalent to FRS is called PMR446, and has channels around 446MHz.
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N0IU
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Posts: 1374


WWW

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« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2013, 03:17:23 AM »

If the designer had sharpened his pencil then, the lawyers would not need to be sharpening their pencils now.

The lawyers won't have time to sharpen their pencils. They will be too busy shopping at the Ferarri dealership!
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M6GOM
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Posts: 1012




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« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2013, 09:55:53 AM »

Because they decided to do curves in not one but two axis it effectively has the shape of a parabolic dish, similar to a more flat satellite dish.

BBC News reporter measured air temperatures over 50C where the beam was focussed.

No idea how such an obvious outcome was overlooked.
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2835




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« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2013, 11:49:55 AM »

"The building, now named the Walkie Scorchie after it began reflecting the ray of light that has left passers-by shielding their eyes, has also badly damaged a van parked nearby."

I wouldn't be too concerned if my van had been "badly damaged".  Now, if it had been "really well damaged", then I might get upset.

"The badly-decomposed body...".  No problem, but that body was extremely well decomposed!"

The English language so often misses by just enough... .
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
M0HCN
Member

Posts: 473




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« Reply #13 on: September 05, 2013, 04:05:49 PM »

I wonder what the lower cutoff for the reflective film is? I am thinking that a van parked up at night with a suitable feedhorn on the roof could do some cool radio astronomy!

Hell, drive the van past the thing and do synthetic aperture radar.

This is rather alarmingly NOT the first time this problem has come up, the other one I am aware of happened at the Vdara in Vegas, a location known for rather more sun then London.

Great civil engineering is quite often also artistically beautiful, the converse is seldom the case.

Regards, Dan.
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TANAKASAN
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Posts: 933




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« Reply #14 on: September 06, 2013, 01:34:06 AM »

The problem here is that they have been too precise in their construction of the building. If each pane of glass was offset by a mm or so then it would not focus on one particular spot.

Tanakasan
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