Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Ragchewing during contests - where do you go?  (Read 31660 times)
N2RRA
Member

Posts: 646


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #15 on: September 09, 2013, 04:37:01 PM »

This post certainly has a hidden agenda knowing damn well the response from non-contesters is going to be negative. LOL! So here are a few suggestions and my opinion towards some of the negative comments made.

First the answer to your question!

All bands and modes are not used during contest periods so finding a band is not the issue. As the operator you have all the room in the world. Just because you can't use a particular band the precise moment you want doesn't mean your crippled, or inhibited in any way finding a band or mode to call CQ and have a rag chew.

The 60m, 30m, 17m, and 12m bands normally are exempt from most if not all contesting during the more world wide popular contests.

What would make common sense is to try other bands to hear if there is any contesting going on, or on the World Wide Web there are contests calendars found. The more informative site is right here on Eham in the "contest calendar" column.

Respect!

How about respecting other people's needs.

This topic will never die nor will contesting. In That case you have to deal with it in A variety of ways.

Option 1: tune into a band out of the many there are where no contesting is allowed on.

Option 2: wait patiently until its over.

Option 3: choose one of the many other "modes" there are to communicate with other than the same every single damn day norm.

Option 4: if you can't beat them join them!

The non-contesters have 5 days of druleing over themselves talking about the same crap on all these NETS than run all day and night. With NETS so abundant you can't find a clear frequency to call CQ. Even if you do you find a clear freq. to CQ you'll find the same disrespect shown to the CQ'er by rag chew groups, because they think the frequency on that day and time has been allocated solely for their group every single day.

Contests are organized and scheduled months in advanced so that all can prepare or be aware. This is not just for contesters, but for rag chew groups and NETS as well so they can do the courteous thing and allow contesters to enjoy a few hours being that 5 and sometimes 7 days a week is usually open to them.

So where's the common sense and courtesy too play nice and fair allowing contesters to enjoy that small 24hour window they've been waiting months for?

Stop being winers and selfish little spoiled babies! The world doesn't revolve around rag chew groups or NETS!

This message is not brought to you by a hard core contester. Just an opened minded respecting ham willing to share all bands and modes.

Try it!
Logged
KE5SBZ
Member

Posts: 29




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: September 09, 2013, 07:30:07 PM »

CQ CQ no test CQ CQ no test de KE5SBZ K  has always worked for me.
73 Ed
Logged
KA0HVE
Member

Posts: 117




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: September 12, 2013, 06:53:56 AM »

N2RRA,

If you go back and read what I posted you'll realize that most of your post doesn't apply to the situation I'm talking about.

I was limited to 1 band (20 meters) and 1 mode (CW) in trying to accomplish what I needed - getting my station working on 20 meters with my CW-only rig.  As far as 'joining them' I probably will later.  I mentioned that.

Hidden agenda?  There isn't one.  As I mentioned, I'm not anti-contester.  I've been back into ham radio all of about 2 1/2 months and I'm trying to get my station more up to date for rag chewing.  Contesting is a whole other level.

"This message is not brought to you by a hard core contester. Just an opened minded respecting ham willing to share all bands and modes."

I think this is the point that is being made: during contests contesters need to show a little respect for the non-contesters.

As it was I waited until the contest completed and then I did my testing and adjusting of my station.  I would call that showing respect for the contesters although I was a bit disappointed by having to wait more than a day but it is what it is.

BTW, I contacted several stations on 20 meters since Sunday afternoon and my station seems to be working quite well.  Smiley
Logged
N0IU
Member

Posts: 1255


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #18 on: September 13, 2013, 04:29:30 AM »

I think this is the point that is being made: during contests contesters need to show a little respect for the non-contesters.

With all due respect, this is exactly the same tired old worn out argument presented by the hard core contest haters! You talk as if rag chewers have a greater right to use the bands and it is the contesters that are interfering with your rights.

NEWS FLASH: People who participate in competitive on-air events have THE SAME RIGHTS TO THE BANDS AS YOU! If someone promised you that you would be guaranteed an open spot on any band using any mode any time you wanted, they lied to you! Amateur radio does not work that way.

It sounds like you want this to be a one-way street. You want contesters to respect your rights to the bands but yet you seem to be unwilling to respect our rights! Sometimes you have to wait your turn!

What about this scenario...

I had a task to perform Saturday afternoon and got delayed until Sunday night.

Obviously you had other things that needed to be done that kept you off the air from Saturday afternoon until Sunday night, but yet you are not here complaining about how these activities, whatever they were, were keeping you from testing out your radio. But when a contest keeps you from getting on the air, now all of a sudden, you have a problem!

And what if you were all set up to test your radio that weekend and there were cells of severe thunderstorms moving through Des Moines? Of course the prudent thing to do would be to stay off the air until they passed well out of the area. If that had happened, would you be here complaining about how the forces of nature were not respecting your rights to be on the air?

I hate to burst your bubble, but sometimes life gets in the way of our hobbies! You don't always get to do what you want any time you want to do it!
« Last Edit: September 13, 2013, 04:42:33 AM by N0IU » Logged
KA0HVE
Member

Posts: 117




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: September 13, 2013, 07:00:16 AM »

NEWS FLASH: People who participate in competitive on-air events have THE SAME RIGHTS TO THE BANDS AS YOU! If someone promised you that you would be guaranteed an open spot on any band using any mode any time you wanted, they lied to you! Amateur radio does not work that way.

Uh, NEWS FLASH!  That's what we're talking about.  They have the SAME rights; no more, no less.

Quote
Obviously you had other things that needed to be done that kept you off the air from Saturday afternoon until Sunday night, but yet you are not here complaining about how these activities, whatever they were, were keeping you from testing out your radio. But when a contest keeps you from getting on the air, now all of a sudden, you have a problem!

Sure I had other things to do.  No one I know does nothing but ham radio 24x7 and that includes me.  AND I'm not complaining.  I'm asking for advice on how to share the band better.

Quote
And what if you were all set up to test your radio that weekend and there were cells of severe thunderstorms moving through Des Moines? Of course the prudent thing to do would be to stay off the air until they passed well out of the area. If that had happened, would you be here complaining about how the forces of nature were not respecting your rights to be on the air?

I've shut down before when a thunder storm has rolled in.  I always do.  Right now I'd gladly give up time on the radio for a big, old, nasty thunder storm.  We're in a drought.  AND I wouldn't complain about a thunder storm either.

Quote
I hate to burst your bubble, but sometimes life gets in the way of our hobbies! You don't always get to do what you want any time you want to do it!

At this point I'm wondering what thread you've been reading.
Logged
NI0C
Member

Posts: 2383




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: September 13, 2013, 07:24:34 AM »

My suggestion would be to focus less on calling CQ, and call others instead. Find the SKCC and QRP frequencies and hang out there.  Expand your band capabilities; I think you would be much happier on 30 meters.

Or join in the contesting fun during major contest weekends.  See: http://www.mail-archive.com/elecraft@mailman.qth.net/msg16585.html

73 & welcome back,
Chuck  NI0C
Logged
W7ASA
Member

Posts: 210




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: September 13, 2013, 12:39:13 PM »

The answer should be simple and truthfully, it really is in the hands of the contesters themselves: if the frequency is busy, do not transmit there.  Most hams adhere to that, so why make an exception Friday through Sunday because there is some award involved?  No reason - just habit.

Do I think that this is going to change and suddenly contesting will become sane?   Roll Eyes    No - However, the fact is that a small percentage of those who contest express the 'my transmitter is bigger than your transmitter' nonsense both here on the forum and -unfortunately- on the air. Rather than discuss this topic like adults, this kind throw trash or worse like a baboon at the zoo, hoping that all their noise and dust will be mistaken for strength.  Are all contesters like this?  No.  However, having a significant percentage who DO intentionally interfere with their fellow hams 'because it's a contest', gives a black eye to those contesters who do have manners and are considerate ham radio operators.



73 de Ray
W7ASA ..._ ._


Logged
N0IU
Member

Posts: 1255


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #22 on: September 13, 2013, 12:55:31 PM »

NEWS FLASH: People who participate in competitive on-air events have THE SAME RIGHTS TO THE BANDS AS YOU! If someone promised you that you would be guaranteed an open spot on any band using any mode any time you wanted, they lied to you! Amateur radio does not work that way.

Uh, NEWS FLASH!  That's what we're talking about.  They have the SAME rights; no more, no less.

Are you sure we are talking about the same thing? You said:

"This message is not brought to you by a hard core contester. Just an opened minded respecting ham willing to share all bands and modes."

But in the very next sentence you said:

I think this is the point that is being made: during contests contesters need to show a little respect for the non-contesters.

So you are willing to share the bands... as long as the contesters respect your rights. I made my comment about rag chewers and contesters having equal rights because you seem to want the contesters to capitulate to your limitations but not the other way around.

The fact that you only have access to two bands on one mode is a self-imposed limitation. If the reason is that you can't afford to buy a radio with more bands, including the WARC bands, then it is none of our business. If the reason is that it is your preference to to use only those two bands where contests are regularly held and only use one mode, then you are simply going to have to deal with the fact that there are competitive events that you will have to deal with.


Sure I had other things to do.  No one I know does nothing but ham radio 24x7 and that includes me.  AND I'm not complaining.  I'm asking for advice on how to share the band better.

I've shut down before when a thunder storm has rolled in.  I always do.  Right now I'd gladly give up time on the radio for a big, old, nasty thunder storm.  We're in a drought.  AND I wouldn't complain about a thunder storm either.

The point that I was trying to make was that there are thousands of things that conflict with our ability to be on the air when we want and we willingly (or not so willingly) take them in stride. When our kids or grand kids have sporting events or recitals, we don't come here complaining about not being able to get on the air. When our wive's want to go shopping for furniture or paint, we don't come here asking them to be more understanding. The list is endless, but I think (I hope!) you get the point. But when a contest keeps you from getting on the air when you want using the mode you want, that's when it is incumbent upon us mean old nasty contesters, to use your own words, "show a little respect for the non-contesters".

As far as advice on how to "share the band", when there is a major 48 hour multi-band ARRL or CQ contest, there is no sharing. Without being able to use the WARC bands or another mode, then there really isn't anything you can do about it. You can come here and look for sympathy, but don't expect to get any.

As far as limiting contests to certain portions of the non-WARC bands, that won't work. Contesters already relinquish 3 HF bands where contesting is not allowed. Just because you don't have access to them or other modes, either by choice or other circumstances, well that just isn't our problem.

Other than Field Day, there are only FIVE 48 hour multi-band CW contests during the course of the year: two by the ARRL, two by CQ Magazine plus the IARU World Championship. On the remaining 47 weekends throughout the year, it is literally just a matter of finding an open spot if you can and claiming it for as long as you can.
Logged
W7ASA
Member

Posts: 210




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: September 13, 2013, 02:11:33 PM »

5 contests of that specific type you mentioned - I'll leave for others to decide.  As for the number of CW contests held, here is only ONE list, that I found with one click of the mouse, as for CW contests, it's a large number.

http://www.lzopen.com/contest/calendar/

I was going to just cut and paste, but it's so loooooooooooooong of a list that I included the link instead.




>de Ray
W7ASA ..._ ._
Logged
N0IU
Member

Posts: 1255


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #24 on: September 13, 2013, 03:29:04 PM »

Yes, it is a long list, but I don't think that events such as the Independence of Venezuela Contest or the Estonian open HF Championship are going to be nearly as much of an issue as one of the CQ or ARRL contests.

No one is denying the fact that there is some sort of competitive event almost every weekend, but there are only a few that run from band edge to band edge for 48 hours.

When someone is limited to CW only on 20 and 40 meters, there is simply no way to avoid these events... other than to not be on the radio at all.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2013, 03:47:10 PM by N0IU » Logged
AB9NZ
Member

Posts: 176




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: September 13, 2013, 04:34:39 PM »

  Contesting isn't my cup of tea. It even seems a little silly to me. That said, I respect the hell out of the stations contesters put together, contesters contributions to the radio art, and their operating skills. I bet nobody minds a contester when they pack their rigs and activate a remote outpost. Where do you think the skill to cleanly run a monster pile-up working thousands upon thousands of stations is practiced?
   When a natural disaster strikes, or enemy planes darken the sky, the skills honed in a contest just may prove to be very handy, even life saving.
              Very best regards,  AB9NZ, Tom Bruzan, Mount Prospect, Illinois
Logged
KD8SAV
Member

Posts: 4




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: September 22, 2013, 01:01:48 AM »

One thing I don't think you anti-contesters thought of.

If it weren't contests in the CW bands, we'd probably lose the CW bands.

As for contests being useless, I'd have to argue with that when there are many rare DX countries on ONLY during a contest.
Logged
N4DSP
Member

Posts: 124




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: October 02, 2013, 05:43:55 PM »

Friday night I got stuff set up so I can now work 20 meters.  I waited until Saturday to try out 20 meters.  Saturday afternoon there's a contest in progress.  I go up the band a bit to a quiet spot and call CQ.  I get a reply so I give my name, QTH, and report his RST.  I don't hear back from him.  Another couple CQs and the same thing with another ham.  I guess they were contesting and when they realized I wasn't they bailed out on me.  I can't fault them for that.

The good thing is I now know I can easily get into Utah and New Jersey on 5 watts with my new set up.

For ragchewing during a contest where does one go?  Do you just shut down and wait until the contest is over?  I suppose I could have participated in the contest and not submitted a log but just exchanging the contest required information isn't much of a ragchew.  I guess I would have learned more about how my new set up will do.  But on a regular basis what do I do to avoid contesters?

Any suggestions?

WARC Bands
Logged
W7ASA
Member

Posts: 210




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: October 03, 2013, 02:21:35 PM »

WARC bands-  OK and naturally, the reciprocal is true : that is - you would not mind it if 'they' allowed contests only on the WARC bands leaving all of the older bands to the rest of hamdom - That would be 'fair' - right?  Oh wait - that's "not fair" would be the loud response .  

So what's the solution? It's really very simple: contester or not, if the frequency is occupied, move to a clear frequency.  That would solve all of this. Do I think that this is going to actually happen during contests?  Hmmmm - about as likely as rampant honesty & selfless statesmanship  breaking out in the halls of congress.  Roll Eyes  // No// There are ethical hams who contest, but they are largely buried beneath the RF Flashmob.


73 de Ray
W7ASA ..._ ._


« Last Edit: October 03, 2013, 02:27:52 PM by W7ASA » Logged
KA0HVE
Member

Posts: 117




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: October 06, 2013, 04:57:36 PM »

Okay.  Lets get something straight.  I originally posted this thread to ask a question.  I'm not ant-contester at all.  Nada. Nyet. Not even a smidgen.  I just wanted to get my rig working on 20 meters one Saturday afternoon and waited until Sunday afternoon because every time I sent CQ way off from all the action it appeared that a contester would answer me and when I began to rag chew the contester disappeared.  Period.

I just wanted to get a signal report or two and have a little chat.  Period.

On Sunday afternoon I completed my task and have been having a wonderful time on 20 meters ever since.  Period.

I will eventually try some casual contesting and if I like it I may even get serious about it.  Period.

I'm sure there may be other times I have to check things out and wondered if there was a good method for avoiding contesters during those times.  Period.

I could try the high end of the 20 meter CW segment but I never hear anyone there.  Maybe that would be a good place for non-contesters to hang out during contests.  Seems like a lot of band width is wasted up there.

Maybe we could call CQ CQ CQ RAG for rag chewing during contests or maybe CQ CQ CQ RC.  I dunno.  Might be a good way to let contesters know that we're not interested in contest contacts at the moment.
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!