Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Voice of Russia stops SW broadcasts  (Read 42188 times)
KJ6ZOL
Member

Posts: 405




Ignore
« on: September 09, 2013, 06:31:49 PM »

http://en.ria.ru/russia/20130821/182889844/Voice-of-Russia-Radio-Stops-Shortwave-Service.html

Once again, the culprit is budget cuts. Like BBC and DW, they plan to rely on FM, and three AM freqs to Russia's "near abroad", which has always been more of a concern to them. Another former powerhouse reduced to broadcasting to the former empire. The problem with local FM is that it can be shut down by local authorities in the event of civil unrest or other disaster, as happened to BBC's Katmandu FM stn during the Nepalese civil war in the mid 2000s.
Logged
K5TED
Member

Posts: 780




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2013, 06:37:36 PM »

International broadcasting is going down the tubes because shortsighted populists believe there is no need.

They are correct. There is also no need for the other thousands of wasteful government programs, none of which is as inherently cool as international broadcasting.

Logged
WW7KE
Member

Posts: 83




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2013, 02:33:16 PM »

International broadcasting is going down the tubes because shortsighted populists believe there is no need.

There is no need because there are very few listeners.  Governments don't operate expensive transmitters for hobbyists.

There is probably no need whatsoever for general coverage receivers anymore.  Outside of us hams, use of the HF spectrum is dying fast.
Logged
W6EM
Member

Posts: 882




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2013, 04:14:01 PM »

About 90% of SW had a political, at least, if not a propagandistic purpose.  Radio Free Europe, Voice of Russia (new and old), China, Japan, and our own Voice of America come to mind.

Certainly there aren't enough in most of the English speaking world who have the means, let alone the desire to listen anymore.  Besides the latest news, most of the content sucks.

Any interest in a "second opinion" on issues of interest is usually met via sources from the WWW.  Except for a few of us old guys/gals who have HF receiving capability.

So, if Putin wants to propagandize us, all he has to do is call up Christine Amanpour, and she'll be in Mockba in a half hour for the recorded CNN interview or a longer spiel, as needed.  He doesn't need to waste all that energy on half-megawatt transmitters (at probably 75% efficiency) that melt the Winter snow.....or pay off Raul Castro to stoke sugar cane in his nearby power plants and HF radio equipment when Habana Rose is taking a break.

So, bottom line is, we can soon expect to see MORE Ruskie-surplus water-cooled high power triodes and tetrodes on eBay.
Logged
N5INP
Member

Posts: 1279




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2013, 04:27:10 PM »

There is probably no need whatsoever for general coverage receivers anymore.  Outside of us hams, use of the HF spectrum is dying fast.

Yup.

Nobody I know listens to shortwave, especially for any kind of news from other countries. Hah. If I asked anyone I know if they listen to shortwave international broadcasting I'd be met with the strangest look you've ever seen.  Huh

Most of the strongest signals I've run across lately are religious broadcasters in the U.S. I guess trying to convert the rest of the world to their particular brand of woo. Good luck with that.

It's either TV or the internets.
Logged
KJ6ZOL
Member

Posts: 405




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2013, 04:28:05 PM »

About 90% of SW had a political, at least, if not a propagandistic purpose.  Radio Free Europe, Voice of Russia (new and old), China, Japan, and our own Voice of America come to mind.

Certainly there aren't enough in most of the English speaking world who have the means, let alone the desire to listen anymore.  Besides the latest news, most of the content sucks.

Any interest in a "second opinion" on issues of interest is usually met via sources from the WWW.  Except for a few of us old guys/gals who have HF receiving capability.

So, if Putin wants to propagandize us, all he has to do is call up Christine Amanpour, and she'll be in Mockba in a half hour for the recorded CNN interview or a longer spiel, as needed.  He doesn't need to waste all that energy on half-megawatt transmitters (at probably 75% efficiency) that melt the Winter snow.....or pay off Raul Castro to stoke sugar cane in his nearby power plants and HF radio equipment when Habana Rose is taking a break.

So, bottom line is, we can soon expect to see MORE Ruskie-surplus water-cooled high power triodes and tetrodes on eBay.

Russia has Russia Today satellite TV to get its message out.

www.rt.com

Russia Today, despite its name, is largely geared towards an American audience-most of the programming is in English and regards NAm and Europe. Russia's allies also have satellite TV, such as Al Jazeera English, to propagandize. Even Iran is shifting to satellite TV, look up "Press TV". I'm seriously thinking of investing in a used Big Ugly Satellite Dish. The only place where HF still lives is in China and Africa, where people are too poor to invest in TV, and too widely scattered for AM and FM. Hams also use HF.
Logged
KJ6ZOL
Member

Posts: 405




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2013, 04:30:11 PM »

There is probably no need whatsoever for general coverage receivers anymore.  Outside of us hams, use of the HF spectrum is dying fast.

Yup.

Nobody I know listens to shortwave, especially for any kind of news from other countries. Hah. If I asked anyone I know if they listen to shortwave international broadcasting I'd be met with the strangest look you've ever seen.  Huh

Most of the strongest signals I've run across lately are religious broadcasters in the U.S. I guess trying to convert the rest of the world to their particular brand of woo. Good luck with that.

It's either TV or the internets.

Rumor has it that the "religious" stns in the US are in fact fronts for the CIA. Some have reportedly heard narrow digital subcarriers on them.
Logged
K5TED
Member

Posts: 780




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2013, 04:58:36 PM »

There is probably no need whatsoever for general coverage receivers anymore.  Outside of us hams, use of the HF spectrum is dying fast.

Yup.

Nobody I know listens to shortwave, especially for any kind of news from other countries. Hah. If I asked anyone I know if they listen to shortwave international broadcasting I'd be met with the strangest look you've ever seen.  Huh

Most of the strongest signals I've run across lately are religious broadcasters in the U.S. I guess trying to convert the rest of the world to their particular brand of woo. Good luck with that.

It's either TV or the internets.

Rumor has it that the "religious" stns in the US are in fact fronts for the CIA. Some have reportedly heard narrow digital subcarriers on them.


Digital subcarriers? What's the formula for calculating the proper aperture in the tinfoil hat earflaps to allow these transmissions to be heard?
Logged
WS4E
Member

Posts: 234




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2013, 06:37:24 AM »

Russia has Russia Today satellite TV to get its message out.

www.rt.com

Russia Today, despite its name, is largely geared towards an American audience-most of the programming is in English and regards NAm and Europe. Russia's allies also have satellite TV, such as Al Jazeera English, to propagandize. Even Iran is shifting to satellite TV, look up "Press TV". I'm seriously thinking of investing in a used Big Ugly Satellite Dish. The only place where HF still lives is in China and Africa, where people are too poor to invest in TV, and too widely scattered for AM and FM. Hams also use HF.


RT is now one of the best news organizations in the world.  Shame the Russians even have better news media than the US does now.  We are turning into the (formerly police state) USSR, and Russia is turning into the (formerly free) USA.
Logged
AA4HA
Member

Posts: 1586




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: September 11, 2013, 10:45:51 AM »

Nobody I know listens to shortwave, especially for any kind of news from other countries. Hah. If I asked anyone I know if they listen to shortwave international broadcasting I'd be met with the strangest look you've ever seen.  Huh
I just tell them that I am listening to numbers stations to receive my invasion planning orders from Jupiter.

They back away, slowly.
Logged

Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 472




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: September 16, 2013, 06:31:34 PM »

There is probably no need whatsoever for general coverage receivers anymore.  Outside of us hams, use of the HF spectrum is dying fast.

Yup.

Nobody I know listens to shortwave, especially for any kind of news from other countries. Hah. If I asked anyone I know if they listen to shortwave international broadcasting I'd be met with the strangest look you've ever seen.  Huh

Most of the strongest signals I've run across lately are religious broadcasters in the U.S. I guess trying to convert the rest of the world to their particular brand of woo. Good luck with that.

It's either TV or the internets.

Rumor has it that the "religious" stns in the US are in fact fronts for the CIA. Some have reportedly heard narrow digital subcarriers on them.


Digital subcarriers? What's the formula for calculating the proper aperture in the tinfoil hat earflaps to allow these transmissions to be heard?

I have in fact heard some pretty interesting and mysterious sidetones that appear to be digital modulation on Pastor Melissa Scott's broadcasts, you should have a listen for yourself.  Covert communications would go a long way toward explaining how these religious broadcasters manage to stay on the air 24/7 with enormous signals.  No tinfoil hat needed, just a simple burst of arithmetic will tell you that the operating costs of these stations is out of proportion with their popularity, and the anonymous funding that religious non-profits are allowed to collect would be a perfect match with the secretive nature of the many spying apparatus that exist here in the USA.

Anyway that tinfoil hat stuff is now obsolete thanks to revelations about the out-of-control nature of our government by the likes of Manning and Snowden.  Thanks for playing.
Logged
K1DA
Member

Posts: 525




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: October 06, 2013, 07:04:32 AM »

Plenty of military and commercial air traffic on HF to pass the time, as well as river boats, ocean going vessels, oil rigs,  and pleasure boaters.    General coverage SSB isn't dead yet. 
Logged
WW7KE
Member

Posts: 83




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: December 31, 2013, 09:06:08 AM »

Apparently, Putin (or whoever he put in charge of such things) has had a change of heart, and the Voice of Russia will remain on the air, but on a reduced schedule - mostly to the Middle East and Asia.

Link:  ARRL
Link:  Voice of Russia Schedule
Logged
K5TED
Member

Posts: 780




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: December 31, 2013, 09:20:17 AM »

There is probably no need whatsoever for general coverage receivers anymore.  Outside of us hams, use of the HF spectrum is dying fast.

Yup.

Nobody I know listens to shortwave, especially for any kind of news from other countries. Hah. If I asked anyone I know if they listen to shortwave international broadcasting I'd be met with the strangest look you've ever seen.  Huh

Most of the strongest signals I've run across lately are religious broadcasters in the U.S. I guess trying to convert the rest of the world to their particular brand of woo. Good luck with that.

It's either TV or the internets.

Rumor has it that the "religious" stns in the US are in fact fronts for the CIA. Some have reportedly heard narrow digital subcarriers on them.


Digital subcarriers? What's the formula for calculating the proper aperture in the tinfoil hat earflaps to allow these transmissions to be heard?

I have in fact heard some pretty interesting and mysterious sidetones that appear to be digital modulation on Pastor Melissa Scott's broadcasts, you should have a listen for yourself.  Covert communications would go a long way toward explaining how these religious broadcasters manage to stay on the air 24/7 with enormous signals.  No tinfoil hat needed, just a simple burst of arithmetic will tell you that the operating costs of these stations is out of proportion with their popularity, and the anonymous funding that religious non-profits are allowed to collect would be a perfect match with the secretive nature of the many spying apparatus that exist here in the USA.

Anyway that tinfoil hat stuff is now obsolete thanks to revelations about the out-of-control nature of our government by the likes of Manning and Snowden.  Thanks for playing.

Seems tinfoil hats are alive and well in that post..
Logged
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1816




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: December 31, 2013, 02:37:05 PM »

Those in the know have switched from tin foil hats to the small open wire mesh kitchen cooking strainers, test have shown they have a Faraday shield effect which just about eliminates any thought process at all being detected from above.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!