Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Most ditty callsign  (Read 10445 times)
N3QE
Member

Posts: 2283




Ignore
« on: September 11, 2013, 12:03:39 PM »

I'm listening to FO/KH0PR calling CQ on 10M right now, and amongst the EU callers for him, is a rather loud signal that I swear is signing "EI5SEEI" (even though that would be too long for a valid EI callsign). He does this speed changeup where the 5 is sent as five E's. FO/KHOPR has tried to come back to him several times with different variations but I don't think they've managed to complete the Q.

Whoever in the EI licensing bureau assigned that callsign... just plain cruel.

10M actually seems in pretty good shape. Hearing Oceania and EU at same time in my mid-afternoon. Super duper hot outside, and just came back from the eye doctor with my eye's dilated, so was relaxing in the dark basement with the radio :-)

Tim.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2013, 12:16:56 PM by N3QE » Logged
DJ1YFK
Member

Posts: 191


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2013, 12:38:54 PM »

I'm listening to FO/KH0PR calling CQ on 10M right now, and amongst the EU callers for him, is a rather loud signal that I swear is signing "EI5SEEI" (even though that would be too long for a valid EI callsign). He does this speed changeup where the 5 is sent as five E's. FO/KHOPR has tried to come back to him several times with different variations but I don't think they've managed to complete the Q.

I've had someone call me with such a ditty mess once in a contest for minutes. I tried to figure it out but he'd just continue to call me; sometimes the call appeared to change a little.

Turned out, it was someone using a PC keying interface who forgot to turn off the transceiver's internal keyer. Instead of directly keying it, he keyed the dots of the built in keyer. Not using a side-tone made him not realize his mistake immediately. He later called with his keying fixed and sent a mail to explain what happened :-)

73
Logged

N3QE
Member

Posts: 2283




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2013, 12:58:54 PM »

I'm listening to FO/KH0PR calling CQ on 10M right now, and amongst the EU callers for him, is a rather loud signal that I swear is signing "EI5SEEI" (even though that would be too long for a valid EI callsign). He does this speed changeup where the 5 is sent as five E's. FO/KHOPR has tried to come back to him several times with different variations but I don't think they've managed to complete the Q.

I've had someone call me with such a ditty mess once in a contest for minutes. I tried to figure it out but he'd just continue to call me; sometimes the call appeared to change a little.

Turned out, it was someone using a PC keying interface who forgot to turn off the transceiver's internal keyer. Instead of directly keying it, he keyed the dots of the built in keyer. Not using a side-tone made him not realize his mistake immediately. He later called with his keying fixed and sent a mail to explain what happened :-)

Oh, OK! Now the light comes on! In which case maybe I was hearing a "EA9". With this keying defect, the A would sound like an I, and the 9 would sound like 5 E's. Several of the EU's I could clearly hear on 10M this afternoon, were EA's.

Once in a contest a guy kept coming back to me but his prefix was "dit-dit-dit-dah-dit". I could never figure out if he was a VE or a SN. Super check partial didn't know him in either event, and of course he could've been mangling other parts of his call too.
Logged
N2RJ
Member

Posts: 1204




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2013, 01:09:16 PM »

Sudan would have to issue ss5sss.
Logged
N2NL
Member

Posts: 336




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2013, 03:00:57 PM »

I wouldn't be surprised if it wasn't EI5HE you heard - he's pretty active as a DXer on CW.

Logged
AF5CC
Member

Posts: 929




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2013, 07:28:45 PM »

Maybe someone in Tanzania has 5H5HHH!

John AF5CC
Logged
AD9DX
Member

Posts: 1487




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2013, 05:09:30 AM »

Maybe someone in Tanzania has 5H5HHH!

John AF5CC

That was what I was thinking... Screw that.
Logged

EX, KC9TRM, KB9IRZ
VK3HJ
Member

Posts: 644




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2013, 06:17:19 AM »

Lotsa dits are a pain in the neck. Hard to copy and hard to send.
Some stations get carried away with the dits and send an extra dit on each ditty character. One must mentally subtract a dit from each character.
The "H" is the most troublesome character in my callsign, but using an electronic keyer, with a little bit of weighting, I rarely have trouble with it now.
With lots of practice, most ops get better, but not always!
73,
Luke VK3HJ
Logged
AK7V
Member

Posts: 251




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2013, 09:34:33 AM »

I can't imagine sending without a sidetone, even if using a computer to send.  In my opinion, if you can't copy the code you're sending, you shouldn't be sending it.
Logged
DJ1YFK
Member

Posts: 191


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: September 12, 2013, 11:49:07 AM »

I can't imagine sending without a sidetone, even if using a computer to send.
People frequently do it when operating SO2R, so they can listen on the 2nd radio during the transmissions on Radio 1.

Quote
In my opinion, if you can't copy the code you're sending, you shouldn't be sending it.
Agreed! :-)
Logged

K4RUM
Member

Posts: 7




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: September 12, 2013, 06:09:15 PM »

The most difficult call I've ever copied was pretty ditty  --  EE5E.  As a former concert band musician who has played hundreds of marches in my day, it took me a long time to ignore the very familiar drum rhythm in order to make sense of the call.  I felt like a real dope!
Logged
N4KC
Member

Posts: 288


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2013, 07:23:41 PM »

I've had the pleasure of working EE5E many times and have the nice QSL card, too.  Right there on the card it says, "The world's shortest CW call sign."  And, of course, it is true.

I love hearing the call being sent, though.  As previously noted, it sounds almost musical.  But then all CW sounds like a pretty tune to me.  When one of our local repeaters goes into voice ID, I can key up and it shifts to a CW identifier.  I love to make it do that!  (And yes, I do identify my station...after the repeater completes sending.)

73,

Don N4KC
www.n4kc.com
www.donkeith.com
 
Logged
VE5EIS
Member

Posts: 52


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2013, 03:20:53 PM »

Mine's pretty good in CW.  VE5EIS.  ...- . ..... . .. ...

Jim
Logged
WX2S
Member

Posts: 735




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2013, 04:53:26 AM »

Wonder what the heaviest weight active CW callsign is?

Logged

73, - Steve WX2S.
I subscribe to the DX Code of Conduct. http://dx-code.org/
N3QE
Member

Posts: 2283




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2013, 05:39:42 AM »

Wonder what the heaviest weight active CW callsign is?

I have had several QSO's with OM0M over the years (often in the OK-OM test).

Ha! Just looked it up in qrz.com. "Dozen Dashes Contest Club"!

Tim.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2013, 06:36:55 AM by N3QE » Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!