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Author Topic: Opinion on Solder-less Crimp on PL259  (Read 30143 times)
W9GB
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Posts: 2626




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« Reply #30 on: September 23, 2013, 06:59:36 AM »

RF Parts sells Specific Dies for the Amphenol Crimp Connectors
as well as RF Industries Crimp Connectors !
http://www.rfparts.com/coax/coax-cabletools.html

I only use RF INDUSTRIES Crimp Connectors (and crimp dies) --
Which has Crimp Spec. sheets for every connector.
I also have one crimp tool setup for RG-213/U and the other for RG-8X Type coaxial cables.

RF Industries EXPLICITLY says Die Crimp Size for all of their connectors.
The Majority of Crimp Tool Dies follow specifications for RF Industries !

RFU-505 for RG-58/U (0.213 for ferrule; .068 for center pin)
http://rfsearch.rfindustries.com/drawings/RFU-505-ST.pdf

RFU-507 for RG-213/U. (0.429 for ferrule; 0.100 for center pin)
http://rfsearch.rfindustries.com/drawings/RFU-507-ST.pdf
« Last Edit: September 23, 2013, 07:19:43 AM by W9GB » Logged
N5INP
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Posts: 1011




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« Reply #31 on: September 23, 2013, 07:11:44 AM »

I only use RF INDUSTRIES Crimp Connectors -- Which has Crimp Spec. sheets for every connector.

RF Industries EXPLICITLY says Die Crimp Size for all of their connectors.
You just need to know how to read a Design Drawing !

Uh, I can if it's the right drawing ... I've seen that drawing and it isn't correct for my parts/tools.

Quote
RFU-505 for RG-58/U (0.213 for ferrule; .068 for center pin)
http://rfsearch.rfindustries.com/drawings/RFU-505-ST.pdf

The stripper I have for the smaller cables, the HT-332



only has two blades by design. The bigger stripper does cut with three blades for larger cables so the other drawing might be OK for that one.

See the top of the tool? That's how it strips. The drawing you show indicates a three blade strip (outer jacket/braid/dielectric). So that leaves me still looking for a drawing that goes with the connectors/tools I have, which I got from Texas Towers. See, that's what I mean - it isn't that easy to find.

http://www.texastowers.com/crimp-kit-plus.htm
« Last Edit: September 23, 2013, 07:15:47 AM by N5INP » Logged
W9GB
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Posts: 2626




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« Reply #32 on: September 23, 2013, 07:23:35 AM »

Quote from: N5INP
The stripper I have fir smaller cables is HT-332
Yes, Dipol HT-332 (2-blade strip) primarily designed for CATV industry installing 'F' connectors.
http://youtu.be/kJBysFsLBHg
I used thus tool in 1980s for cable TV crimp connectors.

Majority of UHF crimp connectors need a 3-blade strip for crimp connectors.
You may be able to use the tool, BUT would require a manual third cut.

Quote from: N5INP
See the top of the tool? That's how it strips. The drawing you show indicates a three blade strip (outer jacket/braid/dielectric). So that leaves me still looking for a drawing that goes with the connectors/tools I have, which I got from Texas Towers. See, that's what I mean - it isn't that easy to find.
You need to contact Texas Towers about this KIT -- What Coax connectors it was designed for??
There are DIFFERENCES between Amphenol/Connex; RF Industries; and Eastern Asia import RF Crimp connectors.

Quote from: N5INP
Uh, I can if it's the right drawing ... I've seen that drawing and it isn't correct for my parts/tools.
I found the reference in less than 30 seconds, on Amphenol/Connex web page.
==
RF Connector Crimp Tooling Selection Guide (for Amphenol/Connex RF Connectors)
http://www.amphenolconnex.com/news/rf-connector-crimp-tooling-selection-guide/
Now it's easier than ever to find the right die set and crimp tool to terminate your RF connectors.  We've created a one page selection guide that shows all of our crimp tool part numbers; both die sets and ratcheting crimp frames.  Additionally, the crimp tool code (shown on the product pages for crimp connectors) is now linked directly to the RF crimp tooling selection guide.

Amphenol / Connex RF Crimp Connectors and Crimp Tool Selection Guide
http://www.amphenolconnex.com/rf-coaxial-crimp-tooling-selection-guide

Amphenol/Connex CRIMP Connectors (Select type you desire)
http://www.amphenolconnex.com

Amphenol/Connex UHF Crimp Connectors (The Crimp Tool / Die is listed on product page)
http://www.amphenolconnex.com/products/connectors/uhf.html

Amphenol UHF Crimp for RG-8X type coaxial cable: part number: 182115-10
USE Crimp Tool: A
http://www.amphenolconnex.com/182115-10.html
« Last Edit: September 23, 2013, 07:55:38 AM by W9GB » Logged
N5INP
Member

Posts: 1011




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« Reply #33 on: September 23, 2013, 09:50:04 AM »

Quote from: N5INP
The stripper I have fir smaller cables is HT-332
Yes, Dipol HT-332 (2-blade strip) primarily designed for CATV industry installing 'F' connectors.
http://youtu.be/kJBysFsLBHg
I used thus tool in 1980s for cable TV crimp connectors.

But wait - the same YT channel shows the HT-332 being used for an N crimp connector with only two cuts into the coax -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Gg7r-_RBH8

that doesn't jive with the drawings you have been linking.

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W9GB
Member

Posts: 2626




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« Reply #34 on: September 23, 2013, 05:13:56 PM »

That is an "N" connector, not the UHF that you asked about.
N connectors always had a good Clamp design, in addition to Solder and now Crimp

BNC (both 75 and 50 ohm) connectors are another bag of worms!!
Some BNC versions can use a 2-blade cut.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2013, 05:15:57 PM by W9GB » Logged
KB8UUZ
Member

Posts: 38




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« Reply #35 on: September 27, 2013, 10:04:06 AM »

Crimping connectors is not that hard. You must pay attention to the proper strip lengths and make sure you have no stray braid strands. Check out the crimp info on DX Engineering's site at:
http://www.dxengineering.com/search/product-line/dx-engineering-ultra-grip-crimp-connector-tools-and-tool-kits?autoview=SKU&keyword=crimp and make sure you look at their instruction manual to get tips and ideas: http://static.dxengineering.com/global/images/instructions/dxe-ut-kit-crimp-rev1.pdf

DX Engineering supplies a stripping chart for all the Amphenol Conneex crimp connectors they carry(UHF,N and BNC). 

The chart is accessible through each connector listing (http://www.dxengineering.com/search/brand/amphenol-connex) on their web site and is also at:
http://static.dxengineering.com/global/images/chartsguides/d/dxe-ccspecs-info_rev0.pdf

Crimp On !!!!!

73
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KD8MJR
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Posts: 2509




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« Reply #36 on: September 27, 2013, 03:01:44 PM »

I am just going to ad my 2 cents.

I have been crimping and sodering cable ends for years, I have probably done near 1000 ends by now.
IMO crimping is better IF you don't have good soldering skills and a proper soldering technique for putting on the ends. On the other hand once you get crimping down pat it's an easy consistent job from that point onward.

If I was asked which one is better, I would say SOLDERING by a long mile.  Reason:  Soldered connections that are done properly keep moisture and water completely out and the connection and the connection surface area is also much greater.
I have almost never found a properly soldered connection that went bad due to the elements but I have seen loads of crimped on connectors that had all the ground braid rotted off or just broken off.

Anyway that's just my 2 cents.
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W5WSS
Member

Posts: 1744




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« Reply #37 on: October 02, 2013, 10:27:08 AM »

I have always soldered my UHF PL-259 connectors.
I have done the pin out work on many cables for Bunker Ramo and consider the skill set.

If one is concerned or suspects that too much heat was used for the job causing any of the associated problems.

The best solution to which methodology used is when the skill set of either does not present additional questions beyond the double checks of system quality immediately after the work is completed.

Questions like: Will the antenna system as a whole perform and last properly? Which also too, includes connectors and sound installation technique by the installer. Poor skill set causing premature failure or intermittent continuity of the coaxial cable to the connector/s.

The impedance of the connectors should be measured prior to installing the coaxial cable.

The photo of the cross section of a soldered UHF PL-259 poses some interesting insight but perhaps the important thing to remember is how well and how long will a better? solder job go towards a good sound connection and prevention to premature failure. As a matter of fact, how long should one last before we do a maintenance anyway?

Fuel for the Fire

73
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W5WSS
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Posts: 1744




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« Reply #38 on: October 02, 2013, 10:30:42 AM »

Meant to be more specific, The impedance of the coaxial cable and UHF connectors should be checked prior to installing them up and too the antenna system prior to service. Smiley
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N6AJR
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Posts: 9910




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« Reply #39 on: October 03, 2013, 10:24:31 AM »

check out high sierra, they have a good kit thats reasonable.  http://www.hamcq.com/
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KD8MJR
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Posts: 2509




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« Reply #40 on: October 03, 2013, 02:35:15 PM »

Its a sad day when Hams can't even solder on their own connectors properly.  What happened to the days when hams built their own radios and Amps?  Now even connectors are too difficult  Huh
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13335




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« Reply #41 on: October 03, 2013, 02:57:59 PM »

It isn't necessarily that soldering is too difficult, but in some cases crimped connectors
are actually better.

For example, soldered coax connectors should't be used in aircraft - they have to be
crimped.  One reason is that the solder can wick down the braid or stranded center
conductor and make it more brittle in a high vibration environment.

I have the equipment to do either, and generally use the crimper if I have the
right connectors on hand.  For RG-213 I'd probably solder it because I still have
a good supply of the old fashioned type of connector.  But that's a personal
preference, not because soldering is "too difficult".
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