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Author Topic: thunderbolt 6n2 amp  (Read 4646 times)
KJ4CVY
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Posts: 1




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« on: October 05, 2013, 01:32:45 PM »

can anyone help with a 6n2 thunderbolt amp
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W7KKK
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Posts: 374




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« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2013, 04:08:58 PM »

It might help if you post your questions on it Huh
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K2OWK
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Posts: 1073




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« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2013, 04:55:51 PM »

KJ4CVY, Is this what you wanted to know.






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 Last modified 2011-09-18 


E.F.Johnson 6N2 Thunderbolt

 
Type: Amateur VHF linear power amplifier
Frequency range: 6 m/2 m
Voltage: Mains
Current drain: ?
Drive power: 5 W
Maximum output power: Max 600 W
Impedance: 50 ohms
Dimensions (W*H*D): ? mm
Weight: ? Kg
Manufactured: USA, 196x-196x
Other: New price 1961: $589.50
Related documents: 
Modifications: 

 
73s

K2OWK
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4844




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« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2013, 03:54:53 AM »

Was there an earlier one (not a linear amp)  using a pair of 826s? I remember having seen one at Dayton about 15 years ago, but at this distance in time, I can't remember if it  was a Johnson amp.
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WA2CWA
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« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2013, 12:31:21 AM »

Was there an earlier one (not a linear amp)  using a pair of 826s? I remember having seen one at Dayton about 15 years ago, but at this distance in time, I can't remember if it  was a Johnson amp.

Gonset VHF amplifier ran a pair of 826's. Window on the front panel so you could see the glow.

Pete, wa2cwa
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4844




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« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2013, 03:11:05 AM »

Tnx Pete

Must be hard to find good 826s now - all that sort of tube seemed to leak easily
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W5JON
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Posts: 174




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« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2013, 07:11:26 PM »

Hi,

I had a Johnson 6&2 ThunderBolt that I purchased from Federated Electronics in New Jersey in 1962, where I worked part time as a teenager. I paid $400.00 NEW, because they could not sell it, because no one wanted that much power on 6M at that time, because of TVI. I sold it in 2008 for $800.00, with not a single problem in 45 years and 1000's of hours of operation. I think about 600 where made, about 100 were in kit form.

It came with a pair of 4x150A that I, almost everyone else that had one changed to a pair 4CX250B's.  The rectifier were a pair of Mercury Vapor tubes 866 (I think), that most everyone changed to a pair 3B28's.

It did an easy KW on both 6 and 2 Meters with 5-10watts drive, and was built like a tank, it weighted about 110 lbs.

Great amplifier,

John W5JON  (ex- WA2PBN)
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K2UE
Member

Posts: 53




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« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2013, 06:38:06 PM »

The 6n2 Thunderbolt was from a different era, and is very dated in design.  Today we would call it "unsafe" because it was from before the 3rd prong was mandated by NEC, and the Neutral of the 240V input is connected to chassis, not to a 4th pin, and unlike modern amp it needs the neutral -- the loads are not all bridged across the 240V, so ordinary modern 240V outlets cannot be used -- it would force current thru the green wire.  Its glass jaw is the PA bandswitch, which is easy to burn out, and pretty much impossible to replace.  The input SWR was not well controlled as it is in modern amps, and varies widely with the various input loadings that may be selected.  It is fussy to tune, and the tubes used have poor linearity and very little reserve dissipation.  There are better choices.
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