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Author Topic: One of the stupidest things Hams say about new hams (Rant)  (Read 44072 times)
G3RZP
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Posts: 4442




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« Reply #45 on: October 10, 2013, 02:27:24 PM »

Cecil,

back to my point about a requirement for a relatively narrow extent of knowledge, but that knowledge in depth.,

There is  a saying here - maybe also in the US - 'jack of all trades, master of none', which rather describes what the present exam system seems to demand. I'm not knocking those who go through it,  but whether the exam system really produces what is wanted (or even needed) for today's amateur.

As I said earlier, there is an argument for a non-technical exam for users of Type Approved equipment, akin to Maritime or Aeronautical users.

A valid argument is that such an exam should be limited to 100 watts, but Type Approved rigs would need something built in to prevent an amplifier being used - not so simple.
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W5DXP
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« Reply #46 on: October 10, 2013, 03:08:28 PM »

As I said earlier, there is an argument for a non-technical exam for users of Type Approved equipment, akin to Maritime or Aeronautical users.

Maybe a more appropriate expansion of the Citizen's Band service? Wonder what ham radio will be like in the future? Has anyone seen the movie, "Idiocracy"?Smiley
« Last Edit: October 10, 2013, 03:12:02 PM by W5DXP » Logged

73, Cecil, www.w5dxp.com
The purpose of an antenna tuner is to increase the current through the radiation resistance at the antenna to the maximum available magnitude resulting in a radiated power of I2(RRAD) from the antenna.
K7RNO
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Posts: 279




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« Reply #47 on: October 10, 2013, 03:49:54 PM »

I call it a freakin' shovel.

When you need a spade and ask for a shovel, freaking or not, you are getting the wrong tool.
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73,
aRNO
NAQCC #6870, SKCC #11131
KD8MJR
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Posts: 2139




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« Reply #48 on: October 10, 2013, 05:33:40 PM »

I am now wondering which written exam was easier, 1950's or 2013?

It is certainly not the fault of the test-takers but there is really no comparison.

There's a 25% chance that my dog will get a present-day 4xmultiple-choice answer correct by stepping on one of four switches at random. Is there a 25% chance that he can answer the following 1950's question?Smiley

192. If the mutual inductance between two coils is 0.1 henry, and the coils have inductances of 0.2 and 0.8 henry, respectively, what is the coefficient of coupling?

No there is no chance a Dog will get 25% on the old exam and also there is no chance he would pass today’s exam but an 8 year old can still pass both of them with ease!

I think what G3RZP is saying is exactly on the money.  Back in the 1950's you had tubes, resistors, caps, inductors, transformers and crystals.  Based on those limited amount of devices and the limited modes of transmission they had to drill down deep on those few components.  If someone really understood the components and could answer the first few questions chances are they could answer all of them.

For instance in that Q192 if you knew the formula M = K*sqrt(L1*L2)
You could answer 192 and several other questions like 192 by just manipulating the formula. That’s pretty much what people do on today’s exams with ohms law and power equations. Just remember one formula and it gives you the answer to 5 questions.

Todays exam covers a much broader area probably 10 fold what a 1950’s exam covered and therefore it cannot require a person to have that same depth of knowledge in each section.

« Last Edit: October 10, 2013, 05:44:43 PM by KD8MJR » Logged
N2EYE
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Posts: 85




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« Reply #49 on: October 11, 2013, 06:46:55 AM »

Mostly, they are angry old men who learned code and are angry that  no -code licensees use privileges they needed code to use.   THe I-Phone has taken a big big bite out of Ham  radio.   The fun is still there and the dying ham radio industry is lobbying hard to get no code so they can sell more radios.   I love building rf Amplifiers.  It is fun    and the comaderie   is great.  Prices are falling which is great and allows more cpommon mankind to get into ham radio.

The worse part is the idiots who think they are 'holier than thou' and   berate no-code techs (I'm a code+Novice from "83   BTW   who upgraded in 2001.   But still I get reqularly insulted when I ask questions about homebrew RF amps.  MY favoriter hobby I like to build amps all sizes.

neil n2eye






































































































































 beratre no code techs ----we all stttttttort dsomehere
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WD8KNI
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Posts: 143




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« Reply #50 on: October 11, 2013, 01:24:16 PM »

N2eye.. you are 100% wrong.. People like you turn intelligent people into angry old men..  My wife can pass this test by simply dividing the clock into 4 quadrants and looking up after she reads a question.  This technique has been proven multiple times at multiple universities around the country.  The averages are with her.. the odds are even better if she would read the pool with the correct answer as she might remember a few.  Then there are the people who memorize the whole pool with answers.

This discussion has absolutely nothing to do with code, no-code or anything else except the dumbing down of testing, and the questions that are asked by people who have passed without the basic knowledge required to do basic operating. And I really don't care if you have been building 11 meter amps since 1983.. don't care if you can operate a computer, program same, or are qualified to teach Albert Einstein, you have absolutely no right to call anyone an idiot.  However we now understand why you waited till the testing was dumbed down before you upgraded.

You sir are the angry old man.  From your writing skills, I certainly understand why you regularly get insulted when you ask a question. Your beliefs and words are an insult to the hobby.  The only idiots we have in this hobby are those who think we want your type of people on the bands at all...   Fred
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KX8N
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Posts: 543




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« Reply #51 on: October 11, 2013, 04:18:34 PM »

Morse code is nothing for a Kid to learn!  Let me repeat nothing at all!

Here's a good example of that: Several years ago I was working as a VE at our local hamfest. There was a girl in there who was about 8. She had a CSCE for her code credit, but she couldn't pass the written part. The code was no problem.
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AD6KA
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Posts: 2236




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« Reply #52 on: October 11, 2013, 04:29:23 PM »

Quote
THe I-Phone has taken a big big bite out of Ham  radio.   

PFAH!
An absurd argument at BEST.
You're comparing apples & oranges.
We use our I-Phones to talk to friends, family and business associates
in going about our daily lives.
We use ham radios to communicate with other hams....as a HOBBY!
Quote
the dying ham radio industry is lobbying hard to get no code so they can sell more radios.    

Oh please.
No code has already been here for SIX YEARS here and is NOT going away.....ever!,
 ......so why "lobby" at all? It makes no sense.
This silly "argument" has been circulating for a long time, sans any data.
Even if there *was" such lobbying, where is the evidence?
Do Icom, Yaesu, Kenwood, Ten Tec, all have lobbyists in D.C.?
Get real.
Quote
The worse part is the idiots who think they are 'holier than thou' and berate no-code techs
(I'm a code+Novice from "83 BTW who upgraded in 2001.
......and you have done no more upgrading in the last 12 years.
Sheesh. You're REALLY involved in the hobby, aren't you OM?
Yet you have the temerity to call others "idiots".

Also, your QRZ log shows a 2013 40m SSB QSO, where (BTW)
you have no SSB privileges. Get with the program.
Quote
MY favoriter (sic) hobby I like to build amps all sizes.
As a Tech you DO know you are restricted to 200 watts....
but I am sure you knew that, just like like the 40m SSB privileges.....

If you brook no truck with "No Coders", why do you make sure
you let everyone know that you aren't one?
 
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K3GC
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Posts: 114




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« Reply #53 on: October 11, 2013, 05:38:43 PM »

This comes up from time to time and it is always ridiculous.  "Things were so much tougher when I was coming up.  You youngsters just don't appreciate sacrifice."  Sound familiar?

I got my original general class ticket when you had to do code and the test was administered by the FCC.  I let it lapse and then retested up to extra a few years ago. Just for the challenge I relearned code and got to 20wpm before I got bored and went back to SSB exclusively.  I don't like cw.  Horrors!!!

No code hams are just like cw hams,  maybe a bit nicer because they don't have axes to grind all the time.

We all have our preferences and that is what makes the hobby great.  If I had been forced to relearn code to get back in radio I am not sure that I would have and then several thousand dollars worth of equipment purchases would not have been made.
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W5LZ
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Posts: 477




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« Reply #54 on: October 11, 2013, 06:54:02 PM »

"Oh, ain't it awful!"
Whoopee, I couldn't care less  about CW being a part of the testing process.  It's a dead issue anyway.
How about learning what the answers to those questions mean instead of just memorizing them?  That would be nice.  "I'll learn it after I get the license", no you won't, not in most cases.  Some will but they are the exception.  It -is- 'dumbing down', and it's almost a common thing now.  That's a shame...
 - Paul
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WA7URV
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Posts: 28




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« Reply #55 on: October 11, 2013, 08:25:34 PM »

I was first licensed in 1973.  From that time on, I've always approached ham radio as a personal learning experience.  While I still like to operate, my focus has been around homebrew and continuous learning.  I want to do license training for people who are interested but haven't yet experienced ham radio.  I would like to train for passing the test and having some good basic understanding of what happens and why.  Based on my experience, I've seen continued enthusiasm from all ages, male and female alike.  I believe it's my duty to pay back (and have fun doing it) by doing some training and getting a few more people into the hobby.  I can't do much to affect those who think things have been dumbed-down or whatever, but I can take positive steps to teach (and therefore, continue learning myself).  I guess it's all about outlook.

73,
Phil, WA7URV, Sherwood, OR
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W5DXP
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« Reply #56 on: October 12, 2013, 05:39:13 AM »

I got my novice license in 1953 and my conditional in 1954. When it came time to choose a major at Texas A&M, my parents wanted me to be a music major but I chose Electrical Engineering only because I wanted to understand how my ham radio worked. Looking back, it was probably an excellent choice - and the young hams of today can make that same choice.
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73, Cecil, www.w5dxp.com
The purpose of an antenna tuner is to increase the current through the radiation resistance at the antenna to the maximum available magnitude resulting in a radiated power of I2(RRAD) from the antenna.
W1JKA
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Posts: 1619




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« Reply #57 on: October 12, 2013, 06:54:09 AM »

  I found it amusing that while taking my General test after being QRT for 43 years all I could relate it to was the current generation of store/clerk cashiers who couldn't make change without the registers digital read out and God forbid that you actually ask them to count the change out back to you. Signs of the times.
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ILDARIN
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Posts: 27




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« Reply #58 on: October 12, 2013, 08:51:21 AM »

Re: WH7DX reply #15

  Good point, perhaps it would be a good idea to have three classes of computer licenses then some of us grand dad hams might be able to keep up with our grandkids. Wink

I like that idea.

No computer license, no internet access.

Technician computer license - can read, but not post.

General computer license - can post to most forums and use e-mail.

Extra computer license - can post anywhere, spout nonsense, and brag about the good old days when people wrote machine code and built their own computers!

(FWIW, I'm an old fart who's new to ham radio but who's used computers for 50 years.)
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AD6KA
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Posts: 2236




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« Reply #59 on: October 12, 2013, 08:57:03 AM »

  I found it amusing that while taking my General test after being QRT for 43 years all I could relate it to was the current generation of store/clerk cashiers who couldn't make change without the registers digital read out and
God forbid that you actually ask them to count the change out back to you. Signs of the times.

That's so true, and sadly funny.
Or say your tab is $15.76.
You hand them a $20 dollar bill and a penny
and they look at you like an idiot and don't know what to do......
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