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Author Topic: One of the stupidest things Hams say about new hams (Rant)  (Read 45790 times)
K8AXW
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Posts: 3902




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« Reply #60 on: October 12, 2013, 09:55:54 AM »

EYE: 
Quote
RE: One of the stupidest things Hams say about new hams

You win!
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W1JKA
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Posts: 1773




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« Reply #61 on: October 12, 2013, 10:05:10 AM »

Re: ILDARIN reply #58

LMAO:    Great license structure breakdown. With those requirements and memorizing a few more questions even I could probably attain Extra status with out getting the first two licenses.
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KK6GMN
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Posts: 150




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« Reply #62 on: October 12, 2013, 07:09:02 PM »

I AM a newly licensed no-code Extra.  I studied for a while, did practice tests and other reading and passed all the requirements.  I am an older fellow but in the Tech industry.  Many of the radio's now have extensive connections to computers.  It is amazing to me how many of the CW approved, smarter and better hams than me, cannot get their radios to talk to their PCs.  They ask the most idiotic questions and are a real annoyance to me.

If you can't tell, this is sarcasm...but my point is, times have changed and I think amateur radio need to change too. This relates to the testing AND the attitudes.
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-SeanM
KK6GMN

"No man is a failure...
...who has friends." --Clarence

Weather at my shack
http://www.pegnsean.net/~sean/weather/wx.htm
KJ7WC
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Posts: 69




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« Reply #63 on: October 12, 2013, 08:52:53 PM »

KK6GMN, I can appreciate your context. Please bear in mind that the amateur radio examination process has been dumbed-down a great deal since even before my time. Back in 1996, when I completed my Amateur Extra, successful candidates had to pass five written examinations, totaling 185 questions; whereas today's process requires only 120 questions across three exams. That's not to mention the Morse code requirement that is now a thing of the past. Unfortunately, you simply applied for licensing at the wrong time, and any disdain should be considered to have a focus of another entity.

Amateur radio really has evolved from a hobby of electronics to one of software. I am a data-communications engineer. While some of the digital communications of today still seems a little convoluted to me, I am most interested in the principals of electromagnetic radiation. When the vast majority of active hams have never experienced, nor care to experience the art and science of tuning a set of tubes, it is truly a sad day. It's just an unfortunate fact that many Extras have gotten their license through nothing more than rote memorization of test material, rather than an understanding of electronics theory and the means of avoiding the creation of interference.

I will not shun new hams. That's not the way of a VE and ARRL registered license instructor. If any of you are interested in using electrostatic signal generation to communicate over vast distances via electromagnetic conversion, then I'll look forward to chatting. ;o)
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K8AXW
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« Reply #64 on: October 12, 2013, 09:49:24 PM »

Quote
but my point is, times have changed and I think amateur radio need to change too.

I hear/read this quote quite often and there's enough truth to it for credence.  However, it doesn't really hold that much water because no matter how sophisticated the transceiver or antenna tuner is, a certain amount of intelligence is required to make them play. 

Then when we get to antennas, grounds, safety and the dozen other facets of assembling a working station and keeping it on the air this computer integration thing becomes almost meaningless.  Reading the questions here on eHam each day proves this.

The present licensing structure does nothing to stop the slide toward another CB hobby.  Sorry!
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KJ7WC
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Posts: 69




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« Reply #65 on: October 12, 2013, 11:01:32 PM »

Maybe a more appropriate expansion of the Citizen's Band service? Wonder what ham radio will be like in the future? Has anyone seen the movie, "Idiocracy"?Smiley

I can tell now that we'll get long just fine. Idiocracy is possibly my favorite movie. Now, if I could only find some DPDT knife switches for my feedline; changing sections of window line with bullet connectors is getting rather tiresome! Grin Nice work, Cecil. My doublet works fantastic.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2013, 11:03:49 PM by KJ7WC » Logged
KE7DJQ
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Posts: 51


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« Reply #66 on: October 13, 2013, 05:40:10 PM »

My wife is not technical at all but she worked very hard to get her General class license.  She knows what HF and 80m are but has trouble remembering that 3.942 is 80m, for example. 

She enjoys Ham Radio and runs the club 2m net twice a month. She just completed the requirements for an ARRL Works All States award on multiple HF bands.  20m and 40m are soon to follow. 
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W9FIB
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Posts: 798




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« Reply #67 on: October 13, 2013, 05:52:48 PM »

Too bad Wayne Green is no longer with us to interject some wisdom to this thread.
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KD8MJR
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Posts: 2531




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« Reply #68 on: October 13, 2013, 07:13:00 PM »

New hams bring enthusiasm which is certainly in short supply with many of the older hams.
They bring money into the hobby which allows all the seasoned hams to get top dollar for their old equipment.
They are the reason that half of the equipment manufactures have not gone belly up!
They are the main reason so many new radios and antennas along with other gadgets have been released over the last 5 years.
New hams are one of the major reasons so many expeditions have come our way in the last 3 years.
And most of all they have saved a dying hobby and reversed its decline into gains.

Love em or hate em without them the hobby would end up going extinct, especially with governments around the world eagerly wanting to sell any undefended spectrum they can get their hands on.
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G3RZP
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« Reply #69 on: October 14, 2013, 02:41:30 AM »

I would certainly have problems interconnecting my radio to a computer - other than the output from a sound card! It has no controlling digital interface although it does have a 4 bit parallel output to say what band it's on. But that's only because I added it to drive the remote antenna selector.

After 24 years of working on/specifying/writing standards for and designing various radio systems transferring bits over the air, I have absolutely no interest in doing the same thing as an amateur.
Strangely, I never felt the same when I was working on analogue systems such as professional HF SSB equipment.
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W5DXP
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« Reply #70 on: October 14, 2013, 04:39:00 AM »

She knows what HF and 80m are but has trouble remembering that 3.942 is 80m, for example.

Actually, 3.942 MHz is closer to 75m than to 80m.Smiley
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73, Cecil, www.w5dxp.com
The purpose of an antenna tuner is to increase the current through the radiation resistance at the antenna to the maximum available magnitude resulting in a radiated power of I2(RRAD) from the antenna.
WN2C
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Posts: 470




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« Reply #71 on: October 14, 2013, 09:49:11 AM »

Cecil,

back to my point about a requirement for a relatively narrow extent of knowledge, but that knowledge in depth.,

There is  a saying here - maybe also in the US - 'jack of all trades, master of none', which rather describes what the present exam system seems to demand. I'm not knocking those who go through it,  but whether the exam system really produces what is wanted (or even needed) for today's amateur.

As I said earlier, there is an argument for a non-technical exam for users of Type Approved equipment, akin to Maritime or Aeronautical users.

A valid argument is that such an exam should be limited to 100 watts, but Type Approved rigs would need something built in to prevent an amplifier being used - not so simple.

That saying was invented in the U.S., as was 'necessity is the Mother of invention'.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2013, 10:02:11 AM by WN2C » Logged
WN2C
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Posts: 470




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« Reply #72 on: October 14, 2013, 10:00:08 AM »

My wife is not technical at all but she worked very hard to get her General class license.  She knows what HF and 80m are but has trouble remembering that 3.942 is 80m, for example. 

She enjoys Ham Radio and runs the club 2m net twice a month. She just completed the requirements for an ARRL Works All States award on multiple HF bands.  20m and 40m are soon to follow. 

Actually, 3.942 is 75 meters.  But who is going to quibble over a few Kcs.
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N4KD
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Posts: 139




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« Reply #73 on: October 17, 2013, 05:59:33 AM »

Too bad Wayne Green is no longer with us to interject some wisdom to this thread.
I suspect there's nothing new under the sun and if we went back through his columns we would find one that addresses this exact problem.

When I was first licensed in 1972, the old guys complained about the new guys, novice class licenses were made fun of, but I quickly figured out that there was a lot to learn from these guys. I showed up at antenna parties, operated the club station, and so on, didn't complain, helped and listened.

I guess it's my turn to gripe, though. (re-read the first sentence) With the ham-crams, study guides, etc, there is really a need for a Ham Radio 101 class to fill in gaps. But there's almost no interest. I'm in a club where members want to hear about DSP, SDR, antenna modelling, etc. But they don't want to know the fundamentals upon which all that advanced stuff is built.

I used Kirchoff's laws to explain why one could hook up two similar power supplies in parallel without peril and was accused of using "heavy duty circuit analysis", as if it were akin to voodoo. So what to do? I guess it's just bite my lip every time I hear someone talking about the different kind of baluns, i.e radiowavz, Array solutions, or Balun Designs, not Voltage or Current, or how one matches a 50 ohm antenna with 50 ohm coax section.

Sorry to waste the time it took to both read and write that, but complaints about the next generation are perpetual. Now to figure out why I can't work C82DX!

vy 73,
Dave N4KD
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KK4RHF
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Posts: 30




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« Reply #74 on: October 17, 2013, 09:01:24 AM »

Since I am a new operator I know there is a lot about this I don't know. I have been involved in electronics formally since 1968, but I fixed my first radio when I was nine years old. I realize there are others in this hobby that know less about electronics or have a broader range of experience than I do. I have worked in manufacturing, repair shops, and the technical end of the oil fields in Texas. I have even worked with a computer that had analog memory.
But I think the most important part of all of this is that we pull together during times of disaster to provide the service that is needed. I'll pack my generator and my radio gear any place and any time that it is needed to help.

I think it's the dedication that amateur radio operators to service is what is important, rookie or experienced does not matter.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2013, 09:13:20 AM by WQNP788 » Logged
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