Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Tech licensees who don't want to upgrade...  (Read 52443 times)
KJ6ZOL
Member

Posts: 405




Ignore
« on: October 25, 2013, 12:58:41 PM »

I was thinking about why so many Tech licensees don't go for General. I know there's a huge dropout rate, but there are hobbies, such as radio controlled "big boy toy" airplanes, that require a license because the emissions exceed Part 15 limits. There are zero ham radio stores here in Sacramento, CA, but several R/C hobby stores. People get into radio controlled stuff, and find they need a license to operate it. They don't care about ragchewing on the HF bands, all they want to do is fly R/C planes. I believe there are other non-ham hobbies that require a Tech license. So, the ones who want to ragchew will get a General ticket. The ones who are just into R/C planes and such won't.
Logged
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1811




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2013, 01:42:27 PM »

   R/C hobbyist aside the Tech license provides just another niche in the hobby for those only interested mostly in the VHF/UHF and related spectrum. I know two hams in my area that have been Techs since the mid 60's whose only interest is line of sight communications, building and experimenting with their own rigs and antenna configurations, each one has probably forgotten more about the technical side of rig/antenna construction and RF than me and most other hams I'm acquainted with will ever know. This is some what akin to the many Generals who don't upgrade to Extra for the simple reason that they have no interest in using certain modes on a few extra frequencies.
Logged
WE7H
Member

Posts: 11




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2013, 06:23:04 PM »

Evening Fellas,

What about those guys...and gals too I guess...that run those VHF/UHF and up QRO moon bounce flamethrowers?  And the satcom...depending on the sat's mode that's mostly tech stuff.  I think there's only 2 modes were you need HF privileges on 15m to uplink and techs have CW on 15m.  I know a couple guys that will bail on a QSO or a net in a heartbeat if there's a satellite pass they want to work.  And for that matter, techs have CW on 15M, 40m, and 80m and just about everything except FM on the lower end of 10m.  And if the VHF/UHF repeaters around here are any indication, there's some serious rags getting chewed on a regular basis.  Lot of D-Star guys here too working that system.

There's something for everybody is the way I look at it.  Even the R/C folks.  Some of those jet and fan driven aircraft are prrreeetty cool!  Just watch out if they start having a 2-way ATC QSO with their pilots  Wink.

Whatever your mode is, go move some electrons!

73 All!
Logged
N0IU
Member

Posts: 1350


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2013, 04:21:48 AM »

There are zero ham radio stores here in Sacramento, CA...

There is a Ham Radio Outlet store in Oakland (and also in Sunnyvale). While not in Sacramento proper, Oakland is only about an hour and a half away. You are lucky to have one so close!
Logged
W4OP
Member

Posts: 439


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2013, 08:33:26 AM »

KJ6ZOL:
 So, the ones who want to ragchew will get a General ticket. The ones who are just into R/C planes and such won't.

Sadly, maybe this is what ham radio has come down to- just talking.
I can tell you there is a LOT more to VHF/UHF then R/C planes- and many of the guys up  there (some whom are tech level) are doing groundbreaking work on feedhorns, LNA's, low sidelobe arrays etc.
I was on 1296MHz EME last night and the number of huge stations capable of ragchewing SSB off the moon was astounding. These guys (many tech level licenses) have designed legal limit water cooled amplifiers,  LNA's whose noise figures are below 0.2dB, high efficiency dual mode circular feedhorns, and dishes  larger than 20' and in some cases 40'.
So don't be so quick to dismiss techs as a lower than general ticket.

Amateur radio used to be about technical excellence and a love of building and experimenting. If it has come down to just talking, I'll stay on VHF/UHF thank you very much.


Dale W4OP
Logged
KJ6ZOL
Member

Posts: 405




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2013, 09:44:49 AM »

KJ6ZOL:
 So, the ones who want to ragchew will get a General ticket. The ones who are just into R/C planes and such won't.

Sadly, maybe this is what ham radio has come down to- just talking.
I can tell you there is a LOT more to VHF/UHF then R/C planes- and many of the guys up  there (some whom are tech level) are doing groundbreaking work on feedhorns, LNA's, low sidelobe arrays etc.
I was on 1296MHz EME last night and the number of huge stations capable of ragchewing SSB off the moon was astounding. These guys (many tech level licenses) have designed legal limit water cooled amplifiers,  LNA's whose noise figures are below 0.2dB, high efficiency dual mode circular feedhorns, and dishes  larger than 20' and in some cases 40'.
So don't be so quick to dismiss techs as a lower than general ticket.

Amateur radio used to be about technical excellence and a love of building and experimenting. If it has come down to just talking, I'll stay on VHF/UHF thank you very much.


Dale W4OP

I have to admit, that sounds interesting. Admittedly, I don't have much of a technical background, and I can't solder well because of poor hand-eye motor coordination (yes, I tried). I might be interested in getting an upper band radio (not a dual band HT, but a real upper band radio) just to lurk. I had to win an argument with my dad (whose property I live on) just to get my G5RV installed properly, so a 40 ft feedhorn is not in the cards so far.
Logged
KD8GTP
Member

Posts: 77




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2013, 01:09:41 PM »

My buddy got his tech license so he could join ARES.  He has no interest in HF, he wants to be able to work vhf/uhf.  So my guess is some simply want to join ARES, run strobe lights and carry a piece. For this they need only the tech ticket. When he gets bored of the emcomm stuff he will just let the license run out.
Logged
N3DF
Member

Posts: 252




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2013, 06:56:54 AM »

Nearly every one of my ham friends who is a serious vhf/uhf operator (other than FM only) has taken the few days required to study and pass General (and often Extra).
Logged

Neil N3DF
W8EIR
Member

Posts: 39


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2013, 05:44:42 PM »

I have a friend at work who got his tech license only to use to for FPV quad copter ops.  He has no intention of upgrading. 
Logged

Got QRP?
------------------
Dave W8EIR
N9LCD
Member

Posts: 181




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: November 05, 2013, 09:19:56 AM »

I upgraded to General a couple of years ago and I could upgrade to Extra if I  felt like it.

But why bother?  At this time, the QTH and other constraints limit me to using a handheld on VHF and UHF.

So, what's the benefits of upgrading other than EGO

N9LCD
Logged
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1811




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2013, 02:15:52 PM »

Re: N9LCD

Since operating finesse and knowledge are no way related to any class license held, the only OTHER benefit you get  is a few more mode/frequency privileges so you have a better chance to find some open band space on contest weekends if not a contester yourself. Since you operate only uhf/vhf there is no reason for bothering to upgrade. 
Logged
AA4HA
Member

Posts: 1581




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2013, 05:50:52 AM »

I upgraded to General a couple of years ago and I could upgrade to Extra if I  felt like it.
But why bother?  At this time, the QTH and other constraints limit me to using a handheld on VHF and UHF.
So, what's the benefits of upgrading other than EGO

Yea, I guess that mobile HF, backpack HF or other things are all part of that ego. If it works that way for you, fine. It is a little sad that you want to paint everyone else with that brush.
Logged

Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
WA8ZTZ
Member

Posts: 54




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2013, 09:33:34 AM »

Got my Technician ticket in 1968 and have been a Tech ever since.  Spend most of my radio time listening... BCB DX, LW NDBs, SWL or building various projects rather than QSOing simply because most QSOs nowadays are "ur 59 es 73s" on all bands.  The Tech license suits me fine and have no interest in "upgrading".  Just me and my .02.  Smiley
Logged
N4NYY
Member

Posts: 4816




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2013, 11:32:15 PM »

I have a friend at work who got his tech license only to use to for FPV quad copter ops.  He has no intention of upgrading. 

Most Techs here that I know do e-comm work and could care less about anything not VHF-UHF. With the exception of Field Day, they never see the HF bands. There is quite a lot you can do with a Tech these days, especially with things like D-Star and such.
Logged
K0RGR
Member

Posts: 106




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: November 13, 2013, 01:35:13 PM »

I was thinking about why so many Tech licensees don't go for General. I know there's a huge dropout rate, but there are hobbies, such as radio controlled "big boy toy" airplanes, that require a license because the emissions exceed Part 15 limits.

The dropout rate is horrendous.

Back here, the big draw is SKYWARN, but the last few years, we've had very few SKYWARN callouts. We get a lot people in our licensing classes to do SKYWARN, and by the end of summer, they are gone because they didn't get to do any storm spotting anyway. So much for hobbies that depend on the weather. We also have a lot of people who just want to do public service or emergency comms.

But, we get a lot of people who are still interested in ham radio as a hobby, and those are the ones that either stick around or get frustrated quickly and drop out. For the hobbyist, it's too much work to find ways to enjoy VHF FM in most places. And all the problems that people have doing HF - high initial cost of gear, antenna restrictions, RFI - are multipled at VHF. Since it's all local, it only takes one jerk to ruin VHF for everybody in the area. Our repeaters have never recovered from a triple whammy a few years ago - a schizoid who refused to take his meds, a belligerent drunk who wanted to everybody's friend, and an on-air panhandler.

I think the most successful Techs today are those who can actually get on HF. Even with QRP and an attic antenna, most of them could make contacts on HF CW if they knew the code. But we don't require the code anymore. 10 meters is the best it's been in many years right now - I hope all the Techs out there are taking advantage of it.

I'd like to see an entry license - either the Tech or something else - that would provide a more balanced (and reasonable) set of privileges. If I were king for a minute, I'd scrap our entire system and adopt the British system verbatim. Their entry ticket has all frequency and mode privileges, but with a 10 watt power limit.
Americans can never be trusted to follow the rules, so that idea is probably a non-starter here, since it would be hard to verify power level.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!