Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Contesting  (Read 15095 times)
KD2EPQ
Member

Posts: 10




Ignore
« on: November 16, 2013, 08:41:48 PM »

Just curious. I'm new to ham and wanted to know if you have to be in a contest to respond to contesters? I hear them exchanging a 3 digit number. Some followed by a letter. I don't have one of those so I stay quiet. This is probably a dumb question for most but I don't know much about contests. Thanks in advance for your responses.

KD2EPQ
Pierre
Logged
KD4TVB
Member

Posts: 81




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2013, 03:40:19 AM »

Hi Pierrre,

First I would like to welcome you to ham radio. No you don't have to be in a contest to respond.
The contester just needs different information depending on which contest it is at the time.

For instance the one that started Saturday 11/16/2013 Sweepstakes.

1) The first number is your contact number for the contest. Example the first contact would be 001 or 1. and the number goes up with each contact.
2) The letter has to do with your power output and  if you are the only operator at your contest station and running 100W.
    Letter A is for a single operator with 100W.
3) The next is your call sign.
4) The next number is the year you got your Ham License.
5) The last part of the exchange is the state your are located. Example: for me it would be NC.

Here is an example of my exchange: 1, A, KD4TVB, 92, NC.

I hope this helps. Just find out what contest is starting before the weekend and read what information they will need to exchange for the contest.
I did not know this one started on Saturday so I just ask the first contester I worked what information he needed from me.
He took the time to let me know and then I was ready to make more contacts.
Thanks NN5V for taking the time to get me ready for the contest.



Best 73,
Charles,
KD4TVB,
Marshall, NC,
ncphotos@gmail.com,
« Last Edit: November 17, 2013, 03:52:34 AM by KD4TVB » Logged
KU8K
Member

Posts: 30


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2013, 04:05:03 AM »

Pierre,

I'm not certain what contest the 3 digit numbers relate to, but in general this is what I will tell you.  Here are some examples of what the code might include.  Sometimes the three digit code will be their signal report and their CQ Zone.  For instance 599, 5-9 is the signal report and 9 is the CQ zone.  It's just a way of getting the numbers out quick.  Also sometimes contests require that you give out the number of the contact.  You will start at 001 and add one after each contact. If you listen for a few minutes the operator might mention what contest they are working.  Every contest has a website that will tell you what information is needed to complete an exchange.  You will generally find this information in the rules.    

The second part of your question is can you contact them?  In most contests, for a contact to be scored both parties need to submit a log to the contest.  They are checked against one another and both operators get points for the contact. If you make contact with the operator calling cq and don't participate in the contest you are making a contact that will not score them any points.  Generally it's not good operating practice to make contact with a contesting station if you have no intention of submitting a log. Having said that, there is nothing stopping you from figuring what contest if being run, determining what is needed for an exchange, and then making contact. Even if you only submit a handful of contacts to the contest.    

Here is a list of contests that will help point you in the right direction. http://www.hornucopia.com/contestcal/index.html

I hope this is helpful,

Bill - KU8K
Logged
NN4RH
Member

Posts: 302




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2013, 10:53:21 AM »

Pierre,

I'm not certain what contest the 3 digit numbers relate to, 

It's ARRL Sweepstakes. If you don't know about SS, then yout don't know enough abuot contests to have any business giving advice to a new guy.
   

Quote
The second part of your question is can you contact them?  In most contests, for a contact to be scored both parties need to submit a log to the contest.  They are checked against one another and both operators get points for the contact. If you make contact with the operator calling cq and don't participate in the contest you are making a contact that will not score them any points.  Generally it's not good operating practice to make contact with a contesting station if you have no intention of submitting a log. Having said that, there is nothing stopping you from figuring what contest if being run, determining what is needed for an exchange, and then making contact. Even if you only submit a handful of contacts to the contest.    





You have no idea what you're talking about.


Pierre - KU8K is clueless. Ignore everything he said. It's mostly wrong. Charles gave the right answer. More information on www.arrl.org/contests
Logged
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2521




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2013, 02:40:52 PM »

Quote
"The second part of your question is can you contact them?  In most contests, for a contact to be scored both parties need to submit a log to the contest.  They are checked against one another and both operators get points for the contact. If you make contact with the operator calling cq and don't participate in the contest you are making a contact that will not score them any points.  Generally it's not good operating practice to make contact with a contesting station if you have no intention of submitting a log. "

Yes, that's maybe the WRONGEST answer I've ever seen to a perfectly good EHam question!  

By all means, plunge in and start working stations. No need to send in a log in order to help him. If you get your exchange wrong (and it happens commonly) a participant will politely correct you.  HE NEEDS YOUR CONTACT whether or not you send in a log, or even log the contract.  

BTW, a three digit exchange by a DX station in the ARRL DX contest will be his power level, such as 599150 meaning he's running 150 watts. The exchange in the wildly popular CQWW CW DX contest coming up soon is report followed by CQ zone, ie. 59904.  Very simple!

What's the Japanese contest where the op (except for YLs) gives his age?
Logged
KU8K
Member

Posts: 30


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2013, 04:43:47 PM »

Pierre,

Please know that the information I gave was to the best of my knowledge and apparently not correct.  I apologize not being correct in my reply.  Best wishes with all your future ham endeavors ... contesting can be a great part of Ham Radio.   
Logged
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2521




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2013, 06:50:38 PM »

Pierre, the ham calendar's best contest, in my opinion, is a few days away, the CQWW CW Contest.

The SSB version was last month. Great DX event for a newbie with just a smattering of code knowledge. There are low power categories and single band categories. I see there's even a Rookie category nowadays!

Last year I worked about 45 different countries using my primitive OHR0100a QRP transceiver on 40 meters. Antenna was just a vertical. Nope, I didn't send in a log! With a bigger station I've usually worked 100 countries in 48 hours, often on just one band. (40 is a great choice, btw)

Many stations will be going >30 WPM, but even a slight-coder should be able to figure it out after awhile and make a few contacts with a programmable keyer. Sunday evening will be much easier than right after the start on Friday.

Scoring gets somewhat involved; I wouldn't worry about that until you get more experience after a few contests. Do NOT call CQ DX. Listen and respond to others. With rare exceptions you should work DX stations, including Canadians, only.

The rules look complex but most won't apply to you. The exchange is very simple, RST report (599 virtually always)  and CQ Zone number:
http://www.cqww.com/rules.htm

GL
Logged
K9GS
Member

Posts: 2




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2013, 07:51:53 PM »


A great way to find out what contest you're hearing is the contest calendar:

http://www.hornucopia.com/contestcal/index.html

For each contest is a link you can click on showing the rules.

Contesters would love to have your contact.  Please read the rules first and listen to a few contacts to get a better understanding of what's going on.

See you on the air!

73,

Gary K9GS

Logged
N7SMI
Member

Posts: 315




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2013, 07:45:24 AM »

While you don't have to submit a log, it's usually a good idea to make more than just one or two contacts in a contest. This verifies that your call is legitimate rather than entered incorrectly by one of the operators.

As a new ham, you should definitely do the Rookie Roundup contests - http://www.arrl.org/rookie-roundup. There are SSB, RTTY, and CW versions. The CW one is December 22nd.
Logged
WA2ONH
Member

Posts: 246




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2013, 09:01:21 AM »

To get your feet wet, try a State QSO party.

I see your QTH is NY and the State QSO Party has already occurred for 2013
NY QSO Party - 1400Z, Oct 19 to 0200Z, Oct 20, 2013

See http://www.hornucopia.com/contestcal/stateparties.html

Back in the day when my NJ QSO was more active, it got me interested in Contesting
on a casual basis from then on. It does improve you operating skill, code speed in my
instance, and overall fun in seeing how your station/antennas competes for QSOs.

Here's some additional links for FYI on Contesting...

The Contesting Compendium
LINK: http://wiki.contesting.com/index.php/Main_Page

30 Ham Radio Contesting Tips
LINK: http://k9jy.com/blog/2007/10/10/30-days-30-ham-radio-contesting-tips/
« Last Edit: November 18, 2013, 09:18:50 AM by WA2ONH » Logged

73 de WA2ONH dit dit    ...Charlie
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
"No time is ever wasted that is spent LEARNING something!"
KS2G
Member

Posts: 364




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2013, 12:07:11 PM »

Hi Pierre,

You'd gotten a lot of piecemeal information -- some of it, as noted, completely incorrect.

For a good introduction to contesting, with lots of details, take a look at these web sites:

Getting started in contesting
http://wiki.contesting.com/index.php/Getting_started_in_contesting

Amateur Radio Contesting FAQ
http://www.qsl.net/zs1an/contesting_faq.html

Contest - from Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contesting

73,
Mel - KS2G


Logged
N5INP
Member

Posts: 743




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: December 14, 2013, 08:18:01 AM »

By all means, plunge in and start working stations. No need to send in a log in order to help him. If you get your exchange wrong (and it happens commonly) a participant will politely correct you.  HE NEEDS YOUR CONTACT whether or not you send in a log, or even log the contract.  

I made some contacts this morning in the 10 meter contest and then started wondering if I should have done it, considering I wasn't really going to compete in the contest. I then ran across this thread. It appears it's OK to make contest contacts if you don't want to submit a log. How then is the other contester's log verified as accurate by the ARRL?

Thanks.
Logged

KD4TVB
Member

Posts: 81




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: December 14, 2013, 07:47:10 PM »


I made some contacts this morning in the 10 meter contest and then started wondering if I should have done it, considering I wasn't really going to compete in the contest. I then ran across this thread. It appears it's OK to make contest contacts if you don't want to submit a log. How then is the other contester's log verified as accurate by the ARRL?

Thanks.
Jump in and have fun that is what amateur radio is all about.
I am sure they have a format to verify the logs.
Only two stations can be talking to each other at the same time in the log so, that is a easy way to check the logs.
Here is an example they might use: If two out of every four operators submit a log to the contest committee they can cross reference them to see if the contacts match with call signs, band, times & QTH like they should.
I  worked 54 stations today in the contest after I got off from work and it was a lot of fun.
The band was in good condition (I had a few stations 5/9+20) for the contest and it was great see all the activity.
Some DX station that I worked had several hundred contacts and some had already made over 1,000 contacts.
One of the reasons I like working stations during a contest weekend is it brings a lot of DX operators on the band.
If you are working on getting your worked all states that is another good reason to get on the band and make some contacts.
I worked 13 different states today on ten meters in the few hours that I was on the radio.


Best 73,
Charles,
KD4TVB,
  
Logged
N0IU
Member

Posts: 1246


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #13 on: December 15, 2013, 05:24:34 AM »

I made some contacts this morning in the 10 meter contest and then started wondering if I should have done it, considering I wasn't really going to compete in the contest.

Many people do not enter a contest with the hopes of actually "competing", but rather to augment their log with stations needed for various operating awards.

It appears it's OK to make contest contacts if you don't want to submit a log.

So why not submit your log? Even if you don't have a dedicated contest logging program that will automatically create a Cabrillo version of your log, you can still submit a good old fashioned paper log.

You actually need two things:
1) Summary sheet: http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Contest%20Forms/10Meter-Sum.pdf
2) The actual log: http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Contest%20Logs/16010log.pdf

Logged
N5GZH
Member

Posts: 87




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: December 28, 2013, 03:20:27 PM »

Pierre,  give yourself points for doing what I recently did not:  Ask before jumping and so that you have requested  exchange information.   I thought I knew what I was hearing before calling, but did not and it's a bit embarrassing.  I have emailed a note of apology to the radio club sponsoring the contest along with a request for  more info.   I'm not new to radio--just new to contesting.  I hope to learn more.

Jim
N5GZH
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!