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Author Topic: Long periods QRT  (Read 9888 times)
WX2S
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Posts: 746




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« on: November 23, 2013, 03:10:17 AM »

Between 1982 and 2012, I never touched a mike or a key. Any other hams here get back on after long periods away?

73, wx2s.
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73, - Steve WX2S.
I subscribe to the DX Code of Conduct. http://dx-code.org/
W1JKA
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Posts: 1816




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« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2013, 03:52:03 AM »

  I was QRT for 45 years. Started as a novice in1962 (WN1EBA), homework and life got in the way while I went to sea for 40 years on various merchant marine/naval ships. I spent quite a bit of time in the radio shacks with the ship's R/Os who were mostly all hams keeping up with code and changing communications technologies. I re licensed in 2009, fortunately I still had my old novice station and various rigs I had collected and restored over the years so it was easy for me to jump right back into the hobby.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2013, 04:00:50 AM by W1JKA » Logged
N0IU
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« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2013, 05:01:31 AM »

Life has a funny way of interfering with our hobbies sometimes!
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G3RZP
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« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2013, 07:04:49 AM »

Which is why, in my 50th year with a licence, I've not been on the air yet this year. Too many people wanting lectures preparing and articles writing - admittedly, all on ham radio matters.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2013, 08:46:36 AM »

Peter:  We all know that ham radio has many facets.  This is one thing that makes it the greatest hobby in existence.

I feel that lecturing, paper and article writing from someone with the abilities is another facet of ham radio.  You are still "communicating" and at the same time leaving behind knowledge which we all use in our hobby and even our profession. What I learned studying for my hobby helped me beyond measure with my work as a power plant operator.

This is a great legacy Peter.  Keep up the good work.

Al -K8AXW
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WB2EOD
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Posts: 219




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« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2013, 06:47:51 PM »

Nothing like 45 years but I do recall periods of either greatly diminished, or no activity.  The patterns may be familiar.
I was licensed at age 15, very active at first but along came cars and YL's and we all know what takes precedence.
Then came college, I don't think I got on the air more than once or twice in the four years. 
As a young bachelor, I squeezed in a few QSO's between working and dating.
Marriage and family definitely cut into operating time.
Now the children are out of the house, I am semiretired, the XYL got her ham license,  we are on the air at least 3 days a week, LIFE IS GOOD

73
WB2EOD

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G3RZP
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« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2013, 02:14:25 AM »

I got to the stage where the YL had her call when I met her at the radio club. Married 30 years this year. Neither of us have time to get on the air!
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WA7SGS
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« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2013, 08:59:00 PM »

Back in 1971 as I recall, I got my Novice during my teen years and was WN7SGS.  A Novice ticket expired after two years and there was no way I was going to be able to make a 440 mile round trip to Portland OR to be at an FCC office at 8:30 AM to get an upgrade at that time.  That was a dead end.

The family friend who was a ham and helped me get into amateur radio as a teen was someone I had not seen in 40 years and I was curious as to whether he still was alive.  At that time I had just completed setting up a fine skipshooting station for 11m and in the previous year it was about collecting Grundigs and Philips radios, so I was back into radio, just not ham radio.  When my old friend was found, that inspired me to go back to those days with him.  I found when the next exam was and it was 3 weeks away, so I studied and snagged the Extra.  As I like to joke, I went from Novice to Extra in one easy step.  It just took me 40 years...LOL!

Along the way I reclaimed my old callsign with the N replaced by an A, sold off all the CB stuff and set up a station in my apartment.  That was fun but the real surprise was seeing how many people from my distant past came out of the woodwork once I got back into amateur radio.  Some were longtime hams, a best friend from elementary school was a new ham and a few were not hams but friends of those who were.  It was so delightful to reconnect with them!

Anyways, that's my story and I'm sticking to it :-)

73,

Rick
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KA1JVQ
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« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2013, 07:07:10 PM »

Same here,

    Started in 1983 as a novice, but didn't really like cw. I was 14 and had "other" things to do Smiley fast-forward to 93 and got my tech plus (couldn't get the 13 wpm for the life of me) bought some 2mtr gear and borrowed a hf radio from my dad so I could get on 10 mtr phone.  LOVED working Europe with a 10 mtr dipole and 60 watts!!!

  The usual stuff (married/college/kids) bought my 1st house in the mid 90's and the xyl said NO antennas on the roof!! by then college was my priority. Moved to NC in 2003 and packed the shack but never set it up. This summer (makes 20 yrs) of being off the air, My youngest soon mentioned something about radios. I dug out my old HT (battery dead of course) and showed him about 2 mtrs. I just inherited my dad's old drake tr4 and got it up and running and the good ole 10 mtr dipole went up.

   Had to get the wall map and push pins and he has been having a blast helping me, Since I like upgrading in years that end in 3's I have bought a general book and will finally upgrade to it this month. Also helps that 10 mtrs has been open the last few months.

73's
Brian   
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K8AG
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Posts: 352




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« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2013, 07:32:37 AM »

I was gone from the early eighties through 2000.  Don't know if it was 9/11 but 2001 I felt the urge to get back in the game.  Took a few weeks to get the CW skills back.  Family is older now so I have a bit more time.  Love it.

73, JP, K8AG
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KB2FCV
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« Reply #10 on: December 02, 2013, 07:47:09 PM »

Got my Novice back in 1988 in 8th grade. Upgraded to Extra by 1989. I was pretty active into the 90's but from the mid 90's into the mid 2000's I was off the air primarily because I lived in apartments that did not have too many options for antennas. I kept my interest though. I still participated in Field Day. 2005 or 2006 we moved to a better apartment where I had access to the attic, that was a game changer and I picked up a rig and was on the air more. We bought a house in 2010 and now I'm on the air fairly often chasing dx, building stuff, etc. I've had the same call since day 1 and always kept it renewed.
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VK6IS
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Posts: 99




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« Reply #11 on: December 04, 2013, 06:44:40 AM »

there was a lot of guys who cut their teeth on CB radio, but boy - did those incumbents < HAMs> get right cranky over all of those low life type taking over their precious 11m  Roll Eyes

- yet an amazing number of those "low life type" soon 'upgraded' to something better.
- wasn't that the idea of a "novice license?'.
& most of them, rapidly upgraded from there, as well .. ..

- which brings up the point, of "where do we recruit them from now?".
- a lot of youngsters are into PC based wifi systems, and some are being encouraged to 'go sideways' - into ham radio.

and now, after a period of absence, - I'm getting back onto HF.
 Cool
« Last Edit: December 04, 2013, 06:48:01 AM by VK6IS » Logged
WO1X
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Posts: 10




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« Reply #12 on: December 04, 2013, 05:37:23 PM »

Steve,

Yes, me too!  I have been off the air for many years and recently became active again.  I started with my ICOM 745 rig in 1985 which was a disaster - 2 breakdowns in about 300 cw qso's.  My second rig (old Betsy) is a Yaesu 757 (NOT the GXII, the original one) which I ran from 1985 to 1993 when I became inactive multiple moves, work, etc.  I entered about a dozen contests with it and actually got a QRP certificate from CQ mag for my section (W1).  When I rekindled my interest, my wife looked at my old radio and asked if things had improved in radio since the 80's.  I explained some of the improvements and she (and my mother in law) urged me to purchase something with newer technology to get the most the hobby has to offer.  I am a director of software development in a large Insurance company and my wife and her mom feel 'all I do is work'.  I do have to admit, when DXing, CW QSO's and just tuning around takes my mind off of everything.

73 to U es URS es Good DX!

Tom - WO1X
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WX2S
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Posts: 746




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« Reply #13 on: December 07, 2013, 05:26:37 AM »

Thanks all! Glad to know that I'm not alone!

My story: I was licensed as WA3RQH in the early seventies. Got a little bored with doing the same old thing and lost interest. My error for not setting goals for myself and acting as a lone wolf.

My neighbor, Gerry N2GJ, had been after me for some time to get back on the air. Then two of my coworkers got their Extra tickets (I had Advanced) and I got envious. Got my Extra in the spring of 2012 (thank you, Gordon West!) and put together a station with a vert and a K3. Was amazed at the advances in the gear over 30 years, and grateful that I didn't have to schlep to an FCC office to take the test.

When I passed, Gerry made the casual comment, "now go work some DX!" So I did. Now have DXCC with 203 confirmed entities at last count, CW endorsement, and WAZ (soon with a CW endorsement.)  Also organized a special event station (N2F) and am active in the QRP Foxhunt, which I found one night while DXing.

Gerry says he created a monster. Smiley

73, Steve WX2S.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2013, 05:34:43 AM by WX2S » Logged

73, - Steve WX2S.
I subscribe to the DX Code of Conduct. http://dx-code.org/
KB1WSY
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Posts: 813




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« Reply #14 on: December 08, 2013, 03:05:24 PM »

In my case, not exactly QRT but worse: I passed the British ham exam in December 1971 ... but never got on the air. Looks like I should be able to remedy that sometime in the next few months, after a gap of more than 42 years since first passing the exam, and after obtaining a U.S. license nearly two years ago.
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