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Author Topic: Who says CW is dead?  (Read 13843 times)
M0LEP
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Posts: 212




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« Reply #15 on: November 26, 2013, 05:04:55 AM »

Perhaps one that's a little more detailed, to distinguish at least a few steps between very occasional use of Morse and use of it to the exclusion of all other modes...
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K8AXW
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« Reply #16 on: November 26, 2013, 08:00:22 AM »

LEP:  While this "detailed" poll or information would be interesting, I don't think it would reflect the answer to, "Is CW dead?"  I think the poll would show that most hams use both voice and CW, HF as well as V/UHF.

The point is that CW is still alive and well, regardless of the frequency of use.

Al - K8AXW
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W5ARP
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Posts: 54




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« Reply #17 on: November 26, 2013, 09:53:28 AM »

  Really? New operators are learning Morse and flocking to the bands just because they didn't like being told what to do? The "Tom Sawer effect" is a silly myth.

Another way to see the cause and effect is that the code requirement stopped a lot of people from taking the first step into amateur radio.  By making that first step easier, people can get in far enough to realize that code is cool and interesting, and then commit to going further.  I'm sort of a case in point for that.  I don't know if I would have taken the time to get licensed if I had to learn it, but now that I'm in, it intrigues me, so I'm beginning to try it.
 
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M0LEP
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« Reply #18 on: November 26, 2013, 10:07:25 AM »

I think the poll would show that most hams use both voice and CW, HF as well as V/UHF.

Possibly. I expect various digital modes would also feature quite strongly. It would be interesting to see the trends of various modes over time.

The point is that CW is still alive and well

Clearly CW is not dead, but to demonstrate that it has a long-term future you'd need to show that new amateurs were taking it up in sufficient numbers, and using it sufficiently enthusiastically, to sustain it. I don't think you'd have any problem doing so, though.

regardless of the frequency of use.

If someone only uses CW for one QSO in a thousand, or uses it for every QSO but only makes one contact a month, then it's hard to say they're doing much to keep the mode alive.

There's one thing that dropping the Morse test requirement has done. Anyone trying to learn Morse these days is doing so because they want to use the mode, and not just because they want access to the bands. It's only folk with older licences you ever hear saying "Oh, I passed the Morse test to get my licence, but I never use CW."
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WB4AUW
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« Reply #19 on: November 26, 2013, 12:20:52 PM »

I think that some of the most enjoyable operating that I ever did was working cw on the novice bands. I think allot of people miss out by not having that option. I'm not an advocate of bringing back the code requirement, just my experience. After being inactive for a long time, I still enjoy looking for cw at a moderate to slow speed. CW contacts still give me a sense of accomplishment.
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KF7ATL
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« Reply #20 on: November 26, 2013, 07:11:49 PM »

I got involved in cw because it is more effective than SSB with my wire antenna. Let's face it: It's tough to compete in a pileup on SSB unless you have a Yagi or similar antenna and an amplifier. CW tends to level the playing field somewhat. Success depends to a greater degree on operator skill than on sheer signal strength.

Having said that, I have stayed with CW because I find it fun and relaxing. Nothing beats a good CW rag chew after a hard day at work. Ditto the comments about the sense of accomplishment. When I work a new DX country or have a nice rag chew with someone who I haven't met before I feel an honest sense of pride in learning and using this skill. I don't think that I am the only one to feel this way. I don't see CW going away anytime soon.


Garth, KF7ATL
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W1JKA
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« Reply #21 on: November 27, 2013, 08:42:21 AM »

CW was alive and well in 1980, check out Morse SOS and rescue recordings from the S.S.Prinsidam fire at sea. www.QSL NET/N1EA or Dave Ring N1EA web page.
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KE7TPA
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« Reply #22 on: November 27, 2013, 10:16:45 AM »

Those who know not the "code" always proclaim it's demise. It is certainly alive and well.
It is without question the most fun one can have in amateur radio. Unfortunately, those who
can't or won't dedicate the time to learn will never know what they are missing. Anyone up
my way near Seattle who would like to learn CW drop me a line, I'll get you headed in the
right direction. Please understand, there are no shortcuts to learning proper CW. It is simply
the process of learning proper technique from the very beginning and building upon that
foundation. Once you establish baseline at say 5WPM, you build expertise simply by exercising
frequently and religiously. 73 KE7TPA retired USCG
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K8AXW
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« Reply #23 on: November 27, 2013, 05:40:16 PM »

TPA: 

Quote
Please understand, there are no shortcuts to learning proper CW. It is simply
the process of learning proper technique from the very beginning and building upon that
foundation. Once you establish baseline at say 5WPM, you build expertise simply by exercising
frequently and religiously.

I've been preaching this for a very long time but have found that I might just as well yell up a dead man's behind! 

Within the next few days there will be another question, "What is the fastest way to learn Morse?  The Farnsworth method or _______________ ?"  Put any other method in the blank.

Everyone seems to be in a hurry these days.....always looking for an easy way and wind up working their asses off doing it!  Or worse yet, failing.

Al - K8AXW
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K5TEN
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Posts: 146


WWW

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« Reply #24 on: November 27, 2013, 07:09:53 PM »

The smart Tech licensees (and there are many) are learning CW by ear (and not computer) and are working DX beyond their wildest dreams...even at 100 watts.  The only skill issue is speed -- both sending and receiving.  The juiciest DX is on CW.  Yeah, they tend to hang out in the lowest 10 khZ of each band --  but THAT -- is your incentive to upgrade to Extra (don't feel  bad  it's been almost 30 years and I still have yet to earn my Extra.) 

CW is FAR from dead.  Not even remotely.

Recently, especially on 40m cw (smart ops) CW, both tech and higher ops working DX has been observed.  Sometimes 40m CW from 7.030 to 7.023 sounds like the novice band of the old days!\

CW is alive and well.   If you are a Tech or rusty General and want more cards in your DXCC file.  Use CW.


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PA0KDW
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« Reply #25 on: November 29, 2013, 12:32:44 PM »

OF COURSE CW IS DEAD.

Guys play their callsign 10000 times with a repeating MP3, so they recognise their own call.
That is all they have to do, and actually do.

They watch on internet DX clusters, tune their bought appliance trx, put the DX call in their keyer by copy and paste from the cluster , another knob of the keyer for 5nn . Thats all.

CW IS DEAD. At this moment at least 75% is ex radio officer around age 80.

Just like the hams telling that their soldering iron is always warmed op. BullS* when it is true: it is heating the shack. The only thing they do sometimes is assembling a kit, and they call that "home-brewing"

That kind of "home-brewing" has noting to do with home-brewing, just like buying a frozen meal in the supermart and heating it at home in your magnetron has nothing whatever to do with cooking.
Frans

 
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W1JKA
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« Reply #26 on: November 29, 2013, 02:51:39 PM »

Re: PA0KDW
 Certainly a wealth of information. Some of us would appreciate the source of theses conclusive surveys or at least reputable web sites pertaining to your statements. I am particularly interested in how you averaged the age of all the ex R/Os and maybe you could enlighten me with the average age of the 25% of CW operators that weren't R/Os. Although your last statement about home brewing is mostly on the mark I wonder why you didn't post it in the appropriate forum.
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VK6IS
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Posts: 99




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« Reply #27 on: December 04, 2013, 07:00:01 AM »

Quote
There had long been the opinion--even longer ago than the removal of code testing--that once that requirement for Morse code testing was gone, people would want to learn that mode.

yes, - there is a lot of CW about,  but just how much of that is with a Fist, & how much of that is on a keyboard?.
- there's some <very> fast CW out there ..
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W5UXH
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Posts: 21




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« Reply #28 on: December 04, 2013, 07:36:02 AM »

"very fast" is of course a relative term!  I use the keyer / paddle for speeds up to about 40 wpm (only on a good day though), but have to switch to the keyboard for speeds up to 65 or 70.  There are a good number of excellent paddle fists out there at speeds up to 40, and a few up to 50. 

I occasionally hear someone using a keyboard at speeds as low as 25 wpm, but I think that is pretty rare.  I believe there are some ops trying to use "code readers" to copy and actually use them in qso, but I think that is also pretty rare.

My impression is that keyboard usage is much less these days than it was 20 and 30 years ago.  Speeds above 30 wpm on either keyer or kbd also seems to be less than in the "old days".  Speeds of 60 wpm and higher are extremely rare.  There are a few ops who can still copy 80 wpm or higher (in a regular conversational qso) but they are quickly being lost to old age (SK).

The lack of teenagers coming into the hobby and loving CW is a problem.  I have one "young" friend who started as a teenager, then was QRT but came back full force in his early thirties.  He quickly was up to 40 wpm on the paddle and a bit over 50 wpm on the kbd.  I just wish there were more of them so if I make it into my 80's there will still be CW ops to QSO!


yes, - there is a lot of CW about,  but just how much of that is with a Fist, & how much of that is on a keyboard?.
- there's some <very> fast CW out there ..

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NO2A
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Posts: 824




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« Reply #29 on: December 07, 2013, 09:08:29 AM »

Though most dx hangs on the lower part of the bands,some will work you in the general portion. I`ve had dx call me even above .050,which I`m glad to see. There certainly is much activity from .030-.040 also. I tend to like .040-.050,as there is less congestion there.
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