Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3] 4 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Ham radio? What's that?  (Read 19857 times)
W4KYR
Member

Posts: 582




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: December 03, 2013, 06:25:52 PM »

With all the fairly recent mainstream talk about preppers, survivalists, zombie apocalypses and Mayan 2012 Calendar, End Of The World-SHTF Scenarios. I'm kind of surprised that more people haven't looked into ham radio as an alternative medium if and when the grid goes down someday.

Speaking of the grid. I remember watching reports of Hurricane Sandy hitting NJ and NY last year and there was a section very close to NYC. People had no idea what was going on, they were asking the TV reporter for the latest news. Seems their cellphones, internet and the grid were all down. They had no way to communicate or even receive the latest news because of the storm.
Logged

Still using Windows XP Pro.
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1773




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: December 04, 2013, 05:22:36 AM »

Today's communications technology is nothing but a daisy chain, break one link i.e. power grid, repeater, cable, satellite etc. and most is lost. What's left is basic HF communications and not necessarily just by hams although they are probably the best prepared for it with LOS HTs, simple radios, wire and battery/solar power. Unless that one big chain link (atmosphere) breaks this type of communications will be the last man standing.
Logged
N2MG
Administrator

Posts: 0



« Reply #32 on: December 04, 2013, 07:34:57 AM »

After explaining that it's "like CB but with licensing" I always add "...and for that we can legally run a lot more power, operate on lots of different frequencies that allow world-wide communications and in general we take the whole radio thing more seriously."  If their eyes don't glaze over, I go on, but usually they do, so I don't. ;-)

The best thing about ham radio when compared to cell phones or the Internet is that it is a "community" of disorganized, dispersed, and independent radios, antenna and operators.   No central government (other than perhaps initial licensing), no central switchboard and a minimum of (if any) infrastructure required.

With regards to SHTF-WROL situations, I agree that Radio seems under-represented. On a fictional note, one personal disappointment with "The Walking Dead" TV series is they only utilized radio communications for a couple of episodes and then its utility was quite unimpressive.  I mean, there was no EMP to kill the electronics like in some stories, so what's their excuse?  I guess, well, it's that they don't even use electricity for the most part!  

Mike N2MG


« Last Edit: December 10, 2013, 12:17:28 PM by N2MG » Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3902




Ignore
« Reply #33 on: December 04, 2013, 08:53:33 AM »

MG: 
Quote
I guess, well, it's that they don't even use electricity for the most part! 

I watched a few episodes of "Walking Dead" until I realized it was a program of zombie target practice, gore and disgusting opportunities to teach the viewers a social lesson. 

However, be that as it may, it became apparent early on that there wasn't any electricity because all the power plants were down.  Apparently zombies have no interest in working.

During my 40 years running a power plant, I did observer a few operators that appeared to be zombies until they sobered up.   Roll Eyes

Al - K8AXW

Logged
KB1WSY
Member

Posts: 805




Ignore
« Reply #34 on: December 08, 2013, 04:53:17 PM »

Not very important to me: the low profile of our hobby/service.

Very important to me: the lack of knowledge, or even any curiosity, about "how things work" or any interest in "building things."

(Not intended as a generational comment BTW. Nowadays this curse is multigenerational.)
Logged
N5INP
Member

Posts: 1043




Ignore
« Reply #35 on: December 11, 2013, 01:42:32 PM »

And more -

I went across the street to visit some young neighbors today, because I hadn't seen their new baby yet. They are probably in their late 20s. I asked them what they were doing these days besides raising two kids, and they also asked me. I said I got back into Ham radio.


 Huh


 Roll Eyes

The guy said what's that?

I said you never heard of ham radio? A lot of it takes place on the shortwave bands.

 Huh

 Roll Eyes

Anyway - you all know where this is going. Amazing.
Logged
KU4UV
Member

Posts: 376




Ignore
« Reply #36 on: December 11, 2013, 02:39:20 PM »

I talked to a lady friend of mine the other day, hadn't heard from her in a while. She asked what I was into these days.

I said "Well, I just got back into ham radio this summer."

She said "What's ham radio?"

I said "You have never heard of ham radio? Amateur radio? You mean you've never heard of that?"

Her "Nope."

I found that hard to believe. Does anyone else find that hard to believe?

By the way, she was born in 1981.

That doesn't surprise me, given the time in which she grew up.  I was talking to a young lady over the phone several years ago that I had met through an online dating site that told me she was born in June 1981.  She asked me what I like to do for fun, and one of the things I mentioned was that I was a ham radio operator.  She also asked, "What's ham radio."  When I explained what ham radio was, and the fact that I had contacted stations in all 50 states and heard astronauts on the International Space Stations on my radios, she said, "Oh, that sounds really cool."  So, no, it doesn't surprise me that the lady you were talking to hasn't heard of ham radio.  Most kids born after about 1981 or 82 have most never talked on a CB radio either, so odds are they aren't going to have clue what ham radio is all about.  I was born in 1974, and my dad had a CB radio in his compnay car up until about 82 or 83 when the CB craze was starting to dry up.  I was always interested in radio and Electronics, and they spurred me to get my ham license shortly before I turned 18.  We have to remember that our hobby simply doesn't receive the exposure today that it did some 40 or 50 years ago.  Just watch some of the old TV shows like, "The Munsters" or "The Addam's Family" that featured ham radio use.  Kids today have way too many other video games and electronic gadgets to occupy their time, so no, it doesn't surprise me that a girl born in 1981 hasn't heard about ham radio.

73,
Mike KU4UV
Logged
KA4NMA
Member

Posts: 348




Ignore
« Reply #37 on: December 15, 2013, 10:45:38 PM »

Several years ago I was looking at an apartment.  The lease agreement mentioned that no radio transmitters are allowed.  I asked the property manager if that included my cordless telephone, microwave oven and cellphone.  She got all flustered and tried to claim that they were not radio transmitters. After several minutes of discussion, she would not budge as she did not understand basic science.  My ex wife kept giving me the eye roll. Later, I got permission to load up the rain gutter for my HF antenna.

Randy ka4nma
Logged
K7MEM
Member

Posts: 106


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #38 on: December 16, 2013, 02:17:04 AM »

The guy said what's that?

You get use to people not knowing what ham radio is.

Before I retires, one of my jobs was to manage the Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Engineering (CAD/CAE) installation where I worked. At the time it was 100% Unix. I did all of the workstation setup/maintenance and installed all of the Engineering software. I then had to teach all the Engineers how to use everything. I did this all by myself for a long time until the management realized it was too much for one person. So they hired a recent Engineering graduate from ASU. I wasn't involved in the hiring process, so I didn't have much to say about the candidate I received. After four years of Engineering school, the person they hired never heard of Ham Radio and never heard of a Unix operating system. Talk about starting from scratch. To his credit though, he also didn't know what CB radio was.

But it opened up a new world to this person. After teaching him everything for two years, he found out that these skill were very much in demand and got a job somewhere else at twice the salary. Not bad for two years of work.

Then I have a neighbor. The neighbor knew full well that I was a radio operator but apparently was not aware of the association to "ham". One day last summer she came by and said she was in the town west of me (Williams, AZ) and saw a sign for a "ham fest". She wanted to know what kind of weird people have a festival about hams. She thought they were some kind of nuts that couldn't go to the Ostrich Fest and made up their own fest.

Martin - K7MEM
Logged

Martin - K7MEM

http://www.k7mem.com
AG6WT
Member

Posts: 461




Ignore
« Reply #39 on: December 16, 2013, 07:23:33 AM »

...So they hired a recent Engineering graduate from ASU. I wasn't involved in the hiring process, so I didn't have much to say about the candidate I received. After four years of Engineering school, the person they hired never heard of Ham Radio and never heard of a Unix operating system. Talk about starting from scratch.

In my book that would have been a red flag. While Unix(tm) might not be as popular as it once was, Linux is a main stream OS especially in university STEM departments. If this person never actually sat down and worked on a Unix/Linux computer, at the very least this grad should have become aware of the OS through conversations with his or her classmates. This leads me to believe that this new hire is incurious about technology and probably won't make a good hire unless they are on a business track like sales.
Logged
K6LCS
Member

Posts: 1552


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #40 on: December 16, 2013, 11:03:25 AM »

EVERYone should have a prepared "30 second speech" on whatever they are doing in life ...
You never know who you might meet on an elevator ... or at the mall ... or at the park ...

And keep it to 30 seconds for starters - you may not have the person's attention for
more than that. If it is a well-prepared 30-seconds, it will "grow" to a conversation. Other-
wise, it just "planted a seed" in someone else's mind ...

Clint K6LCS
http://www.work-sat.com
Logged

Clint Bradford, K6LCS
http://www.work-sat.com
KF5ZGZ
Member

Posts: 13


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #41 on: December 20, 2013, 09:20:45 AM »

I'm not too surprised someone from my generation doesn't know what ham radio is. Society is so uneducated these days.
Logged

JNK247
Member

Posts: 1




Ignore
« Reply #42 on: December 26, 2013, 01:05:41 PM »

hey, it's just general ignorance.

I went to the optician. An Indian gentleman. He asks "What do you do for a living?"

"I'm a radio engineer"

"But nobody uses radio any more - it's all digital"

"How do you think the digits get to the cellphone?"

He was an awful optician, too.......

 Cheesy
Logged
KB1WSY
Member

Posts: 805




Ignore
« Reply #43 on: December 26, 2013, 01:43:01 PM »

EVERYone should have a prepared "30 second speech" on whatever they are doing in life ...
You never know who you might meet on an elevator ... or at the mall ... or at the park ...

And keep it to 30 seconds for starters - you may not have the person's attention for
more than that. If it is a well-prepared 30-seconds, it will "grow" to a conversation. Other-
wise, it just "planted a seed" in someone else's mind ...

Clint K6LCS
http://www.work-sat.com

Clint, I've been thinking about this ever since you posted this some time back.

One of my jobs is as a traveling salesman for our small business. I have an "elevator speech" about my business (and have actually used it several times in elevators at trade shows!).

Seems to me that a canned "elevator speech" about ham radio could be useful for our hobby. Haven't thought about the wording, but will try to come up with something! Do you have a suggestion?

There should probably be two speeches:
--30 seconds (elevator speech).
--90 seconds (dinner party, cocktail party, or when striking up a conversation with the person in the next airplane seat).

Come to think of it, you would expect the brass at ARRL to have devised such things, huh?

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
Logged
N5INP
Member

Posts: 1043




Ignore
« Reply #44 on: December 26, 2013, 04:01:52 PM »

Seems to me that a canned "elevator speech" about ham radio could be useful for our hobby. Haven't thought about the wording, but will try to come up with something! Do you have a suggestion?

Well let's work on one!

I first went to Wikipedia to see how they defined it -

Quote
Amateur radio (also called ham radio) is the use of designated radio frequency spectra for purposes of private recreation, non-commercial exchange of messages, wireless experimentation, self-training, and emergency communication. The term "amateur" is used to specify persons interested in radio technique solely with a personal aim and without direct monetary or other similar reward, and to differentiate it from commercial broadcasting, public safety (such as police and fire), or professional two-way radio services (such as maritime, aviation, taxis, etc.).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amateur_radio

Unfortunately, my woman friend and neighbors wouldn't have a clue what "designated radio frequency spectra" meant, so that's out.  Sad
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3] 4 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!