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Author Topic: Why is RTTY still popular ?  (Read 24859 times)
AC4RD
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« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2013, 03:44:14 PM »

Simple answer:  ... it is FUN!!! 

KA2UUP, you are a smart guy!  Smiley  It is a bundle of fun, original poster!  Yes, it isn't great for low power and wire antennas--but there's still plenty of DX to be had on RTTY, and that's about quadrupled during big RTTY contest weekends.  FUN!  Smiley   And this weekend is the JARTS RTTY contest--give it a shot! 
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KE7TMA
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« Reply #16 on: October 19, 2013, 06:35:26 PM »

Hi all...

I was doing some program learning last evening and had the radio running on 30m, sending out a CQ every few minutes in MFSK when I heard a RTTY station. I tuned it in and managed to get the call once or twice over about 10mins or so....it was a PY2   station which surprised me....Now my point to all this is simple, the trace on my waterfall was a strong one and if the station was using a more robust mode I have no doubts the copy would have been 100% and possibly could have reduce power and still have good copy,  when with the RTTY it was at best 10% copy.

So why is it stations still persist with RTTY especially if chasing some DX....local contacts are a different story.. ?     Operators would be surprised to know that there signals are making the distance, there just not copyable...

John

I have thought about this and have a reasonable answer:  It's the standard "digital" mode.  It's similar to how CW is still popular despite many (most?  all?) hams having a computer capable of digital operation.  There's lots of equipment out there of various eras that is still in operation and if it ain't broke, don't fix it.  There is also a nostalgia factor at play:  It's pretty cool to see an old tube radio with a Teletype machine working the bands and communicating with equipment made recently.  Interoperability, survivability (EMP-fearing people don't have much to worry about with classic boatanchors), and the same type of appreciation for the quality and technology of a bygone era that classic car enthusiasts are known for.

I think RTTY will be here in a hundred years, long after current popular modes like PSK-31 are surpassed by newer modes.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2013, 06:38:44 PM by KE7TMA » Logged
AC4RD
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« Reply #17 on: October 20, 2013, 06:47:20 AM »

I tried posting this a few minutes ago and lost my network connection--apologies if this shows up twice.

The JARTS RTTY contest this weekend has been a blast, so far!  Sunday morning on the east coast (13:00Z), ten meters is wall-to-wall Europeans, with big signals.   Fifteen and twenty were great yesterday, and I'm looking forward to trawling there later this morning.

If you've never tried RTTY, this is an easy contest--the exchange is 599 plus your age.  This would be a good time to give RTTY a try!  Smiley 
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WH7DX
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« Reply #18 on: October 20, 2013, 03:10:41 PM »

I tried posting this a few minutes ago and lost my network connection--apologies if this shows up twice.

The JARTS RTTY contest this weekend has been a blast, so far!  Sunday morning on the east coast (13:00Z), ten meters is wall-to-wall Europeans, with big signals.   Fifteen and twenty were great yesterday, and I'm looking forward to trawling there later this morning.

If you've never tried RTTY, this is an easy contest--the exchange is 599 plus your age.  This would be a good time to give RTTY a try!  Smiley 

I came here to post something like you said.   That was a blast!    10M LP into Europe.   Worked Sparky SU9AF SSB during a break for my last Zone.   10M LP open for a few hours near midnight local.  Just enough energy leading a path from Hawaii down below South America and from there it's an easy ride up.

Yes, RTTY might not be the best - but it's fast - popular and works.   From 12:30am local on 40M I was swamped with 40M from the East Coast sunrise and to the West with JA sunset.  A special time.  One right after another all strong.
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KB2FCV
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« Reply #19 on: October 22, 2013, 01:29:15 PM »

JARTS was fun this past weekend. I was mainly looking for DXCC band fills but wound up making 125-150 QSO's. RTTY has a pretty fast QSO rate. I occasionally stray from CW to digital modes to change things up.

A club member is on the DXCC Honor Roll for Digital.. defintely a great accomplishment.
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W6UV
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« Reply #20 on: October 22, 2013, 02:33:54 PM »

Why is RTTY still popular? Well, I can't speak for everyone, but for me RTTY is preferable to most of the other digital modes because the average QSO is more than just a bunch of macro crap. The average PSK contact these days is not much more than a bunch of canned macro text reminiscent of email spam.
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W8JX
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« Reply #21 on: October 23, 2013, 08:23:20 AM »

Why is RTTY still popular? Well, I can't speak for everyone, but for me RTTY is preferable to most of the other digital modes because the average QSO is more than just a bunch of macro crap. The average PSK contact these days is not much more than a bunch of canned macro text reminiscent of email spam.

While I agree on your comments on PSK, there are other modes and those working them with usually chat some. RTTY has its merits but lacks error correction for poor conditions of weak signals that some digital modes have.
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N3QE
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« Reply #22 on: October 25, 2013, 09:00:16 AM »

Why is RTTY still popular? Well, I can't speak for everyone, but for me RTTY is preferable to most of the other digital modes because the average QSO is more than just a bunch of macro crap. The average PSK contact these days is not much more than a bunch of canned macro text reminiscent of email spam.

While I agree on your comments on PSK, there are other modes and those working them with usually chat some. RTTY has its merits but lacks error correction for poor conditions of weak signals that some digital modes have.

RTTY copy in adverse conditions is substantially enhanced by operator skill and experience. I would encourage repeated use of those skills to enhance enjoyment.

AA5AU and, oh, I forget his call, a famous ZS RTTY contester (ZS4TX?) have had some very good articles explaining use of skill and experience.

My simple observation is that my ears plus a RTTY decoder, is way more powerful than just a RTTY decoder in pulling out good print.

Tim.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #23 on: October 25, 2013, 09:47:41 AM »

I remember the time when many RTTY QSOs consisted of sending feet of X es arranged to form a picture. I say feet because mechanical RTTY machines printed on rolls of paper.

Perhaps the PSK macros are not so bad  Wink
 
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W6RMK
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« Reply #24 on: October 26, 2013, 02:21:47 PM »

I think that RTTY is a pretty good contesting mode.

When several people transmit on the same PSK31 frequency, it's tough to decode what's coming in -- everything mushes together in the decoder.

When several people transmit on the same RTTY frequency, the strongest signal tends to dominate.

That's the FM capture effect. Pretty much all BPSK and FSK (and FM, for that matter) demodulators tend to demodulate the strongest signal. SSB (and CW) are unusual, because the demodulator is "linear" in the sense that the output is the sum of all the inputs.

Note that it is possible to build a very sophisticated FSK demodulator that does adaptive equalization and take care of multipath kinds of things with skywave paths. Just there's not a lot of incentive to do so. If the station on the other end of the link is using an unsophisticated demodulator, then they won't be able to demodulate YOUR signal, even if you can demodulate theirs.

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WB4IUY
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« Reply #25 on: December 07, 2013, 06:03:58 AM »

I'll concur, all RTTY decoders are alike in capability. I've run several different stand-along decoders and various software over the years. As for software, MMTTY does the best job with sound card decoding at my station. I don't recall the version of DM780 I have, but was disappointed in it's ability to properly decode RTTY. I primarily use an old HAL Telereader. It's kinda big an clunky, but is a purpose built decoder that works better than anything else I've ever had or tried. It'll generally copy RTTY right down into the noise.

I like RTTY because I get to use the narrow RTTY filters in my old IC756 std, and it makes for a very selective setup. And like someone else has said, I think it's FUN :-). Contacts are fast and smooth, and I like working it in the contests as well.

Just my $.01 worth :-)
Dave WB4IUY
www.WB4IUY.net
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