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Author Topic: Are the HiFi headsets like Bose good for amateur radio?  (Read 8115 times)
K3STX
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Posts: 994




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« Reply #15 on: September 15, 2014, 08:03:52 PM »

I am with Chuck on this one. I have NOT done lots of side by side comparisons of this and that headphones with lots of measurements. I have compared my Heil ProSet headphones to my "HiFi" JVC noise cancelling headphones. The ProSet phones are AROUND the ears "noise cancellation" while the JVC are on the ears "active" noise cancelling. For low band DXing on CW the JVC phones blow away the Heil ProSet phones. This is ESPECIALLY true when using the NC feature on the JVC phones, but I find that even in "non-NC" mode I prefer the sound of the JVC "hiFi" phones to the Heil ProSet.

I think the moral of the story is "measurements be damned", it is a matter of personal preference and while it seem "impossible" for me to prefer the JVC NC phones, in reality I do. I have used them side-by-side for years, I honestly DO prefer the HiFi phones even for weak signal CW work.

paul
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N3HEE
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Posts: 120




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« Reply #16 on: September 16, 2014, 10:05:45 AM »

As I've stated before.  I use an older pair of Bose Quiet Comfort 2 noise cancelling headphones for cw.   Very comfortable and very quiet.  Really helps when copying weak signals.  No problems with RFI at 500 watts. Still available used at half the cost of new. Check Ebay.  -Joe
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VK6IS
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Posts: 87




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« Reply #17 on: September 17, 2014, 06:55:40 PM »

using a yogo brand of 'phones - Chinese probably.
- whole of ear type muff are on them.
so just place them forward a little, as suggested elsewhere.
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K9IUQ
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Posts: 1953




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« Reply #18 on: September 18, 2014, 11:04:01 AM »

I honestly DO prefer the HiFi phones even for weak signal CW work.
paul

ME too. I have probably a dozen headphones laying around. Several were made just for communications including a Heil Pro mic headset and the others are ipod headphones of one type or another. I really like my Skullcandy earbuds but I can not use them for long periods of time, they hurt my ears. Plus they shut me off from the world which makes my wife unhappy.

I have 2 favorites. One is the Sennheiser HD238 made for ipods. I have used this headphone for a couple of years. It is very comfortable, and is open air type so I can hear my wife hollering "Dinner Time". Besides that they really sound good. I used the multi-band RX equalizer built into my TS-590s to get them sounding just the way I want.

In April my wife dragged me to a Flea Market. I found a set of Dr. Dre headphones. They were brand new in an original box. These are highly hyped headphones for the Rap music crowd. The price was only $25. Since I had my iphone with me I looked the model up on Amazon, they were about $200. I figured they must be stolen or shoplifted. I asked the fellow selling them if I could try them on my iphone to see how they sounded. Well, I loved them, I offered the guy $20, he said $23 and I walked off with them.

I use them for music but found I really like them for hamradio too. Very comfortable and the hyper red color makes me really stand out as a ham. My wife says I look 30 years younger when I wear the Dr Dre's, I feel younger too..  Wink Wink Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy

My advice, use what sounds great to your ears, if you want good sound and look super cool get the Dr. Dre's...

I think the moral of the story is "measurements be damned", it is a matter of personal preference  
paul

Right on Bro.   Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy

Stan K9IUQ
« Last Edit: September 18, 2014, 11:10:53 AM by K9IUQ » Logged
K1ZJH
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Posts: 1074




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« Reply #19 on: September 23, 2014, 07:28:35 AM »

When your radio is limited in bandwidth to 2.8  kHz for appliance operators and a few hundred Hz for CW , the noise is limited to that bandwidth by the radio and the bandwidth of the headphone does not matter at all.  When it is wider you payed for that while not using it.



Ideally, that is correct... but deficiencies in the detector and audio sections can cause high frequency artifacts and distortion.  Too much IF gain can also cause excessive white noise in the recovered audio. All of which can lead to fatigue after long listening periods. It is a good idea to have external options available to tailor the recovered audio response.

Pete
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N4DSP
Member

Posts: 158




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« Reply #20 on: September 23, 2014, 01:19:08 PM »

What is the model number of your JVC's?


I am with Chuck on this one. I have NOT done lots of side by side comparisons of this and that headphones with lots of measurements. I have compared my Heil ProSet headphones to my "HiFi" JVC noise cancelling headphones. The ProSet phones are AROUND the ears "noise cancellation" while the JVC are on the ears "active" noise cancelling. For low band DXing on CW the JVC phones blow away the Heil ProSet phones. This is ESPECIALLY true when using the NC feature on the JVC phones, but I find that even in "non-NC" mode I prefer the sound of the JVC "hiFi" phones to the Heil ProSet.

I think the moral of the story is "measurements be damned", it is a matter of personal preference and while it seem "impossible" for me to prefer the JVC NC phones, in reality I do. I have used them side-by-side for years, I honestly DO prefer the HiFi phones even for weak signal CW work.

paul
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K3STX
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Posts: 994




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« Reply #21 on: September 24, 2014, 12:13:12 PM »

They are JVC HANC250 headphones.

paul
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K3GM
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Posts: 1815




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« Reply #22 on: September 26, 2014, 09:26:16 AM »

I own the QC-1, QC-2 which are over the ear, along with the QC-3 which are on-ear.  All three are effective for cancelling the noises going on in the basement where my shack is; oil burner, dehumidifier, amp blower, etc.  They're all great for digging out signals just above the noise floor.  My favorite pair though are the In-Ear QC-20.  These are the most lightest, fatigue-free headphones I've ever worn.  Their problem of course is the personal nature of them.  You just can't hand them over to a friend to stick in his ear canal.  I don't find the wide frequency response of either of the headphones to be a problem.  I happen to work for the manufacturer, and have suggested a model with a narrow band response.  But when you look at the quantities we produce for consumer audio, there isn't much interest for developing a pair for our sector of the business.
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SWL2002
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Posts: 345




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« Reply #23 on: September 27, 2014, 06:09:59 PM »

Are they or do they allow too much "noise" into one's ear?

Just try them and find the answer for yourself.  Asking here will just get you a bunch of arm chair opinions saying that they are not a good idea, make you hear "hiss", etc... blah blah blah...  Experience is worth much more than the arm chair opinions of some of the yoyos that will answer you here.
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STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #24 on: September 28, 2014, 04:26:54 PM »

Yes, they are great for amateur radio listening.
They take out the outside distractions (noise cancelling types that is), and make you more focussed on the audio.
I use Bose QC15 headphones and they sound great.
The usual things apply as to getting sweaty, airs getting sore etc, but this is the same for anything which covers your ears.
As for the noise cancelling genie of "pressure" sensations, I have never noticed it at any time in 5 years of listening.

It is a pleasure to use comfortable, and great audio response earphones, no matter to what audio you are listening.

In addition, if you use programs to process your audio in your PC and listen to the results, you can dispense with
external audio filters etc.
For example, Spectrum lab , a free audio program, will allow you to use all sorts of filters or even graphically draw your own.
Need half a dozen notches in your audio, no problem - just drawn them in.

As hams, we don't always use the great facilities available for PC post processing, but I assure you as an avid CW user,
these programs really make listening more pleasant.
In addition MULTIPSK has a filtering option which gives a pseudo stereo effect on mono inputs which seems to spatially
separate CW signals of varying tones.
This is a fun, quirky, and useful facility as well.
The only thing which, for CW work, you have to be aware of is that there is a latency (time delay) in audio processing
which has to be taken into account.

Apart from that, use the best earphones you can find, and enjoy the experience.

73,
Rob
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N4DSP
Member

Posts: 158




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« Reply #25 on: October 03, 2014, 08:33:55 AM »

Very happy BestBuy has an excellent return policy. I say this because I purchased the Bose QC15 and though they are a very good headset they are not worth the $269.00 paid for them when other headsets can be had for $100 or less. I find little benefit in keeping the Bose and so returned them. Now if I were a frequent flier perhaps that is another story. But for ham radio one does not need all these hi-tech noise cancellation headphones that cost a lot of $$$.

I compared the Bose to the Yamaha CM-500 which cost $50 and the sound from the CM-500 were no different and just as comfortable to wear. In fact the CM-500 covered the ear completely while the Bose required me to tuck my ear lobe inside the cavity each time I wore them.

With such a limited bandwidth we use for ham radio most headsets are overkill. Save your money on those Bose with their high prices.


I will putt a WAV audio file on my website with that kind of noise on

http://pa0wv.home.xs4all.nl/noise.wav

Download it, duration 10 second, So put is in the repeat mode in windows media player, volume :loud, use it as external noise in your room. Take your excellent noise cancelling headphone on your head, no input on the phone plug needed,  and report here the difference please, with cancellation switched on and off.

73=30

I have been using the Bose QC-15 headphones for several years now, and am pleased with them.  I don't need to do a simulated test with them, because I can report that my heaphones work very well suppressing the random noise in my actual ham shack environment, i.e., amplifier blower noise, and kitchen exhaust fans. 

73,
Chuck  NI0C
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NO9E
Member

Posts: 416




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« Reply #26 on: October 04, 2014, 02:39:33 PM »

I compared Yamaha CM500 with on-the-air $99 corded Bose from Sam's Club. The radio is K3. For some reason Bose sounds nicer: more like in a real room than with headphones. This was a surprise to me. No really due to frequency response so I have no idea why the difference.
Ignacy, NO9E
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N4DSP
Member

Posts: 158




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« Reply #27 on: October 04, 2014, 03:35:17 PM »

Not sure what to think about that NO9E but I ordered another CM-500 and within ten minutes it was back in the box back to the seller. Whenever I keyed the transmitter there was a buzzing noise and the received  signals did not sound right. This was my second pair. Wanted a newer one since the age of my original was 5 years or more. Nice to have a backup.

Called the company for a return shipping label was sent via email and placed another order. It arrived the following day and this one performed as expected. Don't get me wrong the Bose had a beautiful sound but it was the price.

Appreciate your feedback.

73
john


I compared Yamaha CM500 with on-the-air $99 corded Bose from Sam's Club. The radio is K3. For some reason Bose sounds nicer: more like in a real room than with headphones. This was a surprise to me. No really due to frequency response so I have no idea why the difference.
Ignacy, NO9E
« Last Edit: October 04, 2014, 03:38:01 PM by N4DSP » Logged
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